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Re: acc. vs gen reading

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  • Ben Crick
    ... Hullo Andrew, I think you ll find that D in the Epistles is Codex Claramontanus (Paris, sixth century), containing the Pauline epistles; not C Bezae
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 7, 2002
      On Fri 4 Jul 97 (10:04:42 +0930), anku@... wrote:
      >�Metzger, in his textual commentary states that the variant should be
      >�discounted because even though it is supported by B it is also
      >�supported by D and G, which weakens the authority of B. Now I checked
      >�Metzger's Text of the NT where he describes D as western witness
      >�containing the Gospels and Acts and G as a Byzantine witness containing
      >�the gospels - no mention of Romans anywhere!

      Hullo Andrew,

      I think you'll find that "D" in the Epistles is Codex Claramontanus (Paris,
      sixth century), containing the Pauline epistles; not C Bezae which is Gospels
      and Acts only.

      "G" is a ninth-century MSS in Dresden (v Dobschuetz 012; v Soden a1028),
      containing the Pauline epistles.

      FWIW the King James opted for DIA TO ENOIKOUN (Byzantine text). The
      Revised Version of 1881 relegated that to the margin, and opted for
      TOU ENOIKOUNTOS AUTOU PNEUMATOS. It is well known that Westcott and Hort
      frequently preferred the "difficult" reading, on the grounds that that would
      be the more likely to have been "improved" by an editor; therefore the
      more likely to have been the original. IMHO this is rather a subjective
      approach to the problem. I think Fee has got it right.

      Charles Hodge, /Romans/, new edition, Edinburgh, 1864, pp 260f has an
      interesting comment antedating W&H:

      "For the reading DIA TO ENOIKOUN AUTOU PNEUMA, Wetstein quotes the MSS D.E
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