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Re: Hebrew Bible, etc.

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  • Timster132@aol.com
    In a message dated 95-11-30 12:20:55 EST, PFlesher@UWYO.EDU (Paul V. M. ... I agree. It can be understood as supercessionist, the second being an improvement
    Message 1 of 1714 , Nov 30, 1995
      In a message dated 95-11-30 12:20:55 EST, PFlesher@... (Paul V. M.
      Flesher) writes:

      >I disagree with Prof. Deist that the term "First Testament" shows respect
      >for the Jewish character of the Hebrew Bible. To say "First" is to imply
      >that there is a "second," which those who use the term (primarily
      >Christians) obviously think is the New Testament. So the term "First
      >Testament" is simply another Christian term that ends being parochial with
      >regard to Judaism.

      I agree. It can be understood as supercessionist, the second being an
      improvement on the first.

      >Personally, I think that there is no good single term. Instead, "When in
      >Rome one should do as the Romans do."

      That's why I prefer the term Tanakh. The term is of Jewish origin, and as
      an acronym it embraces the literature we're talking about: the torah, the
      prophets and the writings.
      As for Tobit, Wisdom, etc., caling this group the Apocrypha doesn't bother
      me. The Duetero-canonical and Intertestamental have particular positions in
      mind, I think.
      And when it comes to the NT, I think New Testament should be ok. Jewish
      scholars understand that we Christians have a New Testament. I think it may
      be acting *hypersensitively* to change it. ( I may be wrong).
      I've had a tough time coming up with good working alternatives to NT, too.
      To call it the Greek Scriptures (as opposed to calling the OT 'the Hebrew
      Scriptures') really confuses me, because when I think Greek Scriptures, I
      think of the LXX as well.
      I've heard 'Christian writings' for the NT, but then again, the Tanakh is
      our
      Scripture too.
      Then there's the 'apostolic writings', and that's not bad, but when I hear
      it,
      I think of the apostolic fathers. And not all the writers were apostles.

      So, when in inter-faith settings, (such as TC-list) I'd recommend Tanakh
      for
      the OT and New Testament for the NT. And I wouldn't make it a law, just a
      matter of voluntary ettiquette.

      My 2 denarii,

      Tim Staker
      Timster132@...
    • Julian Goldberg
      The complete Hebrew Scriptures (Hebrew Bible) or TANAKH (Torah-Law, Neviim-Prophets, Ketuvim-Writings) based on the Masoretic Hebrew text with vowels and
      Message 1714 of 1714 , Feb 4, 1997
        The complete Hebrew Scriptures (Hebrew Bible) or TANAKH (Torah-Law,
        Neviim-Prophets, Ketuvim-Writings) based on the Masoretic Hebrew text
        with vowels and cantillation marks in one complete compact black hard
        covered volume which measures 12 cm x 19 cm with over 1360 pages that
        have been arranged according to traditional chapter and verse divisions
        along with larger Hebrew letter printing and thicker paper pages for a
        volume of this size. Each book is $ 20.00 (U.S.) postpaid ($ 15.50 for
        the book plus $ 4.50 for postage) and can be ordered directly from:

        Julian Goldberg, 260 Adelaide St., E., # 215, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
        M5A 1N0.

        Thanks.
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