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Byzantine canon

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  • Harold P. Scanlin
    In addition to the helpful bibliographic references mentioned by Adair and others, the three volume set edited and translated by William A. Jurgens, -_The
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 25, 1997
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      In addition to the helpful bibliographic references mentioned by Adair and
      others, the three volume set edited and translated by William A. Jurgens,
      -_The Faith of the Early Fathers_ (Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 1970
      - 1979), is very helpful. You may also be interested in my article in the
      Meyendorff memorial volume, "The Old Testament Canon in the Orthodox
      Churches," in _New perspectives on historical theology_ (Eerdmans, 1996),
      pp. 300 - 312. It is important to keep in mind that the Orthodox Churches
      are autocephalous, that is, each "national" Orthodox church decides for
      itself its own canon, not only in the number of books but in the definition
      of "canon." There is, on the other hand, an Orthodox approach to the
      entire topic, even though specifics may vary.

      I think the willingness to include the works associated with Jeremiah and
      Daniel, even in earlier canon lists which are quite close to the Hebrew
      canon, reflects an attitude towards "canon" that focuses on inspired
      writers rather than on inspired books/editions of books. In a way, it's
      "the exception that proves the rule" that in the earlier period there was a
      decided preference for the Hebrew canon in the East.

      Harold P. Scanlin
      United Bible Societies
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