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Re: Parchment & papyrus

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  • Ulrich Schmid
    ... I would like to add a relatively recent article by T.C. Skeat, _The Origin of the Christian Codex_; in: ZPE 102 (1994) 263ff. Ulrich Schmid, Muenster
    Message 1 of 36 , Feb 18, 1997
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      On Mon, 17 Feb 1997, Larry Hurtado wrote:

      >N.B. Christians didn't "invent" the codex; it had been used
      >for some time, but primarily for non-formal writing, such as
      >notes, etc. Earliest was the bundle of wax tablets,
      >thereafter parchment codices. Martial even refers to
      >experiments with the codex for publication of literary works
      >but suggests this didn't catch on. Christians appropriated
      >the codex-format and seem to have *used* it programmatically
      >far earlier than any other group. WhY?
      >Various possibile scenarios have been suggested. They fall basically
      >into 2 types: (1) The Christians may have intended some
      >socially/religiously defining significance--Torah is to be written on
      >scrolls, so the Christian writings were put in anothe format to
      >distinguish them, either as Christian or as something other than
      >"scripture"? (2) Christians appropriated the codex for practical
      >reasons, such as the one Kilmon sketched. But remember that scrolls
      >can be prepared with more than one book (e.g., the "book of the 12",
      >the "minor Prophetes" are written on one scroll in ancient times).
      >Codices did come to be made that could handle a larger amount of
      >texts and more writings than is practical for scrolls, but the
      >earliest Christian codices are quite a bit smaller and more modest
      >than the grand 4th cent ones!
      >THose interested really could start with the C.H. Roberts, T.C Skeat
      >volume, _THe Birth of the Codex_.

      I would like to add a relatively recent article by T.C. Skeat, _The Origin of
      the Christian Codex_; in: ZPE 102 (1994) 263ff.

      Ulrich Schmid, Muenster
    • Ulrich Schmid
      ... I would like to add a relatively recent article by T.C. Skeat, _The Origin of the Christian Codex_; in: ZPE 102 (1994) 263ff. Ulrich Schmid, Muenster
      Message 36 of 36 , Feb 18, 1997
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        On Mon, 17 Feb 1997, Larry Hurtado wrote:

        >N.B. Christians didn't "invent" the codex; it had been used
        >for some time, but primarily for non-formal writing, such as
        >notes, etc. Earliest was the bundle of wax tablets,
        >thereafter parchment codices. Martial even refers to
        >experiments with the codex for publication of literary works
        >but suggests this didn't catch on. Christians appropriated
        >the codex-format and seem to have *used* it programmatically
        >far earlier than any other group. WhY?
        >Various possibile scenarios have been suggested. They fall basically
        >into 2 types: (1) The Christians may have intended some
        >socially/religiously defining significance--Torah is to be written on
        >scrolls, so the Christian writings were put in anothe format to
        >distinguish them, either as Christian or as something other than
        >"scripture"? (2) Christians appropriated the codex for practical
        >reasons, such as the one Kilmon sketched. But remember that scrolls
        >can be prepared with more than one book (e.g., the "book of the 12",
        >the "minor Prophetes" are written on one scroll in ancient times).
        >Codices did come to be made that could handle a larger amount of
        >texts and more writings than is practical for scrolls, but the
        >earliest Christian codices are quite a bit smaller and more modest
        >than the grand 4th cent ones!
        >THose interested really could start with the C.H. Roberts, T.C Skeat
        >volume, _THe Birth of the Codex_.

        I would like to add a relatively recent article by T.C. Skeat, _The Origin of
        the Christian Codex_; in: ZPE 102 (1994) 263ff.

        Ulrich Schmid, Muenster
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