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Re: More on 2427

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  • Maurice Robinson
    ... Which is why I was careful to note that it was corrected by a non-B type of MS. However, items in 2427 such as the long ending of Mark are more likely
    Message 1 of 1714 , Nov 1, 1996
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      On Thu, 31 Oct 1996, Robert B. Waltz wrote:

      > This brings up an interesting philosophical point. I said that 2427 was
      > *not* a copy of B, because it differs in dozens of places from Vaticanus --
      > and relatively few of these differences are in the direction of the
      > Byzantine text-type. They look more like they came from another Alexandrian
      > witness.

      Which is why I was careful to note that it was corrected by a "non-B" type
      of MS. However, items in 2427 such as the long ending of Mark are more
      likely to have been inserted from a more Byzantine type of MS, I suspect,
      though I would have to see collation data there for 2427 to see if any of
      the Alexandrian distinctive readings of the long ending might be present.

      > This brings up a serious question: How much change can a manuscript
      > tradition undergo and still be considered direct descent? For example,
      > I've seen people who consider F G of Paul to be direct descendents of
      > D -- which is simply ludicrous. I'd just like to know how others feel.

      If virtually all MSS are "mixed" in varying degrees (which I think is a
      given, even among the Byzantine Textform MSS), then the only matter of
      "direct descent" would be when one has something like D/D-abschrift in the
      Epistles.

      Yet stemmatically, one MS might be copied directly from another, and still
      be quite distinct, due to errors made while copying, corrections made
      while copying, inclusion of correction data from the exemplar, use of a
      second exemplar for verification at certain points, etc. Multiply these
      factors geometrically by the same possibilities recurring in subsequent
      copies, and the amount of mixture which can result over even one or two
      copying generations can become immense. After 10 or more copying
      generations, the ultimate parent may well no longer be discernable.

      Even the "family" groups (like f1, f13, etc.) which are closely related
      and descend from a hypothetical lost uncial exemplar differ widely among
      themselves (see the various Studies and Documents volumes), and the
      archetype of the lost uncial from which they derive is generally assumed
      to be established by taking only those readings where family group members
      _depart_ from the Byzantine Textform, on the assumption that the
      correction trend would be away from non-Byzantine to Byzantine readings by
      that time period (which of course would likely be correct, though I would
      suggest that following the non-Byzantine reading of but _one_ family
      member against the remainder of the group will likely result in an
      aberrant reading being claimed as that of the uncial exemplar rather than
      the reverse).


      _________________________________________________________________________
      Maurice A. Robinson, Ph.D. Professor of Greek and New Testament
      Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary Wake Forest, North Carolina
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    • Julian Goldberg
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      Message 1714 of 1714 , Feb 4, 1997
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