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MUSLIM FASHION, KAZAN (REU)

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  • Saguit KHAIROULLINE
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 6, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      > MUSLIM FASHION
      > KAZAN, TATARSTAN, RUSSIA
      >
      > Tatar women turn to more traditional and Islamic
      > style of dress in Russia s predominantly Muslim republic.
      >
      >
      > DINA YARULLINA, CUSTOMER OF
      > "ALTYNAI" SALON OF MUSLIM WEAR, SAYING:
      > "When girls are walking around wearing revealing
      > clothes, they attract men s attention. Clothes had been
      > created not to attract attention but to protect us from the
      > environment - from the cold when its cold and from the sun
      > when its hot. The girls wearing revealing clothes serve as
      > a sexual objects and attract men s attention while I feel
      > protected dressed like this (in long overcoat and
      > headscarf)."
      > GULNARA KADYROVA, DESIGNER AT
      > "ALTYNAI" SALON OF FASHIONABLE MUSLIM WEAR, SAYING:
      > "Costume, and clothing has always been influenced by
      > history and tradition; the clothes worn by Muslims from
      > Arab countries and Turkey were different from the clothes
      > worn by our Tatarstan Muslims. The main difference was that
      > clothes for our Muslim women, of Kazan, never completely
      > covered them. And also there was a big difference between
      > clothes worn by young girls, younger women and older women."
      >
      > STORY: Islamic values are seeing a revival in Tatarstan,
      > one of Russia s predominantly Muslim republics; more people
      > are practising their faith and Tatar women have taken to
      > wearing clothes that conform to the Islamic dress code or Hejab.
      > But on a warm summer s evening in the centre of Kazan,
      > capital of Tatarstan, it can be hard to be convinced that
      > Islam, albeit a more tolerant version of the faith, is
      > making a comeback.
      > In streets lined up with cafes and bars, young people
      > have gathered to enjoy an evening out; the young women are
      > dressed in the latest Western fashions - mini-skirts, high
      > heels and short tops.
      > Several well-known Western fashion outlets, selling
      > clothes for women, have stores in Kazan, but today they
      > face renewed competition from local outlets that have
      > opened their doors to customers wanting to buy fashionable
      > but more traditional clothes that conform to the Islamic
      > dress code.
      > A few hundred metres away from a "Mango" outlet in
      > central Kazan, a modest poster depicts women in Islamic
      > style long shirts and headscarves. The poster advertises
      > the "Muslima" store, one of several stores selling clothes
      > for Muslim women, recently opened in Kazan.
      > Many of these stores sell clothes for women imported
      > from Arab countries and Turkey.
      > At the salon "Altynai" designer Gulnara Kadyrova shows
      > a customer her latest designs for wedding dresses.
      > "When girls are walking around open, they attract men s
      > attention. Clothes had been created not to attract
      > attention but to protect us from the environment - from the
      > cold when its cold and from the sun when its hot. Girls
      > wearing revealing clothes serve as sexual objects and
      > attract men s attention while I feel protected wearing
      > clothes like this (long overcoat and head scarf)," sais
      > Dina Yarullina, a medical student and a regular customer at
      > the "Altynai" salon.
      > Kadyrova says her clothes offer new designs based on
      > traditional clothes worn by Tatar Muslim women.
      > "Costumes, and clothing has always been influenced by
      > history and tradition; the clothes worn by Muslims from
      > Arab countries and Turkey was different from the clothes
      > worn by our Tatarstan Muslims. The main difference was that
      > clothes for our Muslim women, of Kazan, never completely
      > covered them. And also there was a big difference between>
      > clothes worn by young girls, younger women and older
      > women," said Kadyrova.
      > She expects her business to grow now that Islam has
      > become more visible in Tatar life. Of the republic s 3.7
      > million people, some 52 percent are Muslims.
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