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[tatar-l] Moslem Extremism in Tatarstan

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  • SabirzyanB@aol.com
    Moslem Extremism Threatens Stabilitity of Russian Republic Tatarstan KAZAN, Russia, April 10 (AFP) - Moslem militancy is steadily gaining ground in Tatarstan
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 9, 1999
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      Moslem Extremism Threatens Stabilitity of Russian Republic Tatarstan

      KAZAN, Russia, April 10 (AFP) - Moslem militancy is steadily gaining ground
      in Tatarstan threatening the peaceful co-existence of the Russian and Tatar
      communities here and the stability of this mainly Moslem republic of federal
      Russia.
      In a sign of the authorities' growing concern, Tatarstan's President Mintimer
      Shaimiyev in March denounced the "emissaries from Islamic countries who
      recruit young men in Russia to give them military strength abroad".

      In recent months, many Pakistani "missionaries" have been expelled from
      Tatarstan for engaging in "illegal activities", including calling for a holy
      war, according to informed sources in the Tatar capital Kazan, 850 kilometres
      (500 miles) from Moscow.

      The fear is that these "missionaries" along with students from Koranic
      universities in Syria, Saudi Arabia, Libya and Egypt "are introducing foreign
      ideas of Sunni thinking here, says Tatarstan's Moslem spiritual leader Gusman
      Hazrat Iskhakov.

      "It is difficult to get an idea of the number of Wahhabis (who don't
      recognise the official Islam)" or those who follow the Sufi (ascetic, mystic)
      tradition," added Iskhakov, while adding that the numbers were small compared
      to the total of two million Moslems in Tatarstan which has a population of
      3.8 million.

      "Today the Wahhabis are not very dangerous but the situation could change
      rapidly as they recruit in poor regions of the country, where the population
      doesn't know any better and is receptive," to their methods said a worshipper
      at the Nourulla mosque in central Kazan, who said he was close to the
      Wahhabis.

      The Wahhabis, conservative Moslems who strictly follow the Koran's teaching,
      could offer strong support to ultra-nationalists seeking an independent
      Tatarstan, such as the Tatar Public Centre.

      Last December, Rafis Kashapov, the group's leader in Naberezhnyye Chelny, in
      eastern Tatarstan, announced the sending of Wahhabi volunteers to Chechnya
      and Iraq "to fight for Allah and Islam".

      Sizeable Wahhabi groups have developed in Chechnya and another Russian
      republic Dagestan in the Russian Caucasus, as well as in several central Asia
      republics including Uzbekistan.

      The Tatar Centre in Naberezhnyye Chelny, east of Kazan, opposed the
      construction of an Orthodox church near a mosque, said Tatarstan's Orthodox
      Archbishop Monsignor Anastassi. Some 48 percent of Tatarstan's inhabitants
      are Russians, from the Orthodox tradition.

      Speaking up for "the persecuted Albanian Moslems" the Tatar Centre called
      this month for volunteers to fight in Kosovo against the Serb forces.

      The authorities here have, so far, managed to maintain the peaceful
      coexistance of the Orthodox Russians and the Moslem Tatars, offering equal
      aid to the two communities to rebuild their churches and mosques after the
      vicissitudes of Stalinism.

      Relations between the Moslem and Orthodox hierarchies are excellent, Iskhakov
      and Anastassi stress, invoking the traditions of mutual tolerance between
      Tatarstan's two main communities.





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    • Helen Marie McIntosh Faller
      Isenmesez, Would you please be so kind as to tell me who wrote this article? It seems to be authored by someone who is anti-Tatarstan. I know there is a
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 10, 1999
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        Isenmesez,

        Would you please be so kind as to tell me who wrote this article? It seems
        to be authored by someone who is anti-Tatarstan. I know there is a
        tendency among Western journalists to equate Islam with jihad and
        Morrocans with Indonesians. The tenor of this piece of writing in no way
        echos my own experience in Tatarstan. Indeed, Tatarstan is perhaps the
        least extreme and most stable place I have ever visited.

        Rahmat ham sau buligiz,

        Helen Faller

        On Sat, 10 Apr 1999 SabirzyanB@... wrote:

        > Moslem Extremism Threatens Stabilitity of Russian Republic Tatarstan
        >
        > KAZAN, Russia, April 10 (AFP) - Moslem militancy is steadily gaining ground
        > in Tatarstan threatening the peaceful co-existence of the Russian and Tatar
        > communities here and the stability of this mainly Moslem republic of federal
        > Russia.
        > In a sign of the authorities' growing concern, Tatarstan's President Mintimer
        > Shaimiyev in March denounced the "emissaries from Islamic countries who
        > recruit young men in Russia to give them military strength abroad".
        >
        > In recent months, many Pakistani "missionaries" have been expelled from
        > Tatarstan for engaging in "illegal activities", including calling for a holy
        > war, according to informed sources in the Tatar capital Kazan, 850 kilometres
        > (500 miles) from Moscow.
        >
        > The fear is that these "missionaries" along with students from Koranic
        > universities in Syria, Saudi Arabia, Libya and Egypt "are introducing foreign
        > ideas of Sunni thinking here, says Tatarstan's Moslem spiritual leader Gusman
        > Hazrat Iskhakov.
        >
        > "It is difficult to get an idea of the number of Wahhabis (who don't
        > recognise the official Islam)" or those who follow the Sufi (ascetic, mystic)
        > tradition," added Iskhakov, while adding that the numbers were small compared
        > to the total of two million Moslems in Tatarstan which has a population of
        > 3.8 million.
        >
        > "Today the Wahhabis are not very dangerous but the situation could change
        > rapidly as they recruit in poor regions of the country, where the population
        > doesn't know any better and is receptive," to their methods said a worshipper
        > at the Nourulla mosque in central Kazan, who said he was close to the
        > Wahhabis.
        >
        > The Wahhabis, conservative Moslems who strictly follow the Koran's teaching,
        > could offer strong support to ultra-nationalists seeking an independent
        > Tatarstan, such as the Tatar Public Centre.
        >
        > Last December, Rafis Kashapov, the group's leader in Naberezhnyye Chelny, in
        > eastern Tatarstan, announced the sending of Wahhabi volunteers to Chechnya
        > and Iraq "to fight for Allah and Islam".
        >
        > Sizeable Wahhabi groups have developed in Chechnya and another Russian
        > republic Dagestan in the Russian Caucasus, as well as in several central Asia
        > republics including Uzbekistan.
        >
        > The Tatar Centre in Naberezhnyye Chelny, east of Kazan, opposed the
        > construction of an Orthodox church near a mosque, said Tatarstan's Orthodox
        > Archbishop Monsignor Anastassi. Some 48 percent of Tatarstan's inhabitants
        > are Russians, from the Orthodox tradition.
        >
        > Speaking up for "the persecuted Albanian Moslems" the Tatar Centre called
        > this month for volunteers to fight in Kosovo against the Serb forces.
        >
        > The authorities here have, so far, managed to maintain the peaceful
        > coexistance of the Orthodox Russians and the Moslem Tatars, offering equal
        > aid to the two communities to rebuild their churches and mosques after the
        > vicissitudes of Stalinism.
        >
        > Relations between the Moslem and Orthodox hierarchies are excellent, Iskhakov
        > and Anastassi stress, invoking the traditions of mutual tolerance between
        > Tatarstan's two main communities.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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      • SabirzyanB@aol.com
        In a message dated 99-04-10 21:07:21 EDT, Hellen Faller wrote:
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 10, 1999
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          In a message dated 99-04-10 21:07:21 EDT, Hellen Faller wrote:

          << Isenmesez,
          Would you please be so kind as to tell me who wrote this article? It seems
          to be authored by someone who is anti-Tatarstan. I know there is a
          tendency among Western journalists to equate Islam with jihad and
          Morrocans with Indonesians. The tenor of this piece of writing in no way
          echos my own experience in Tatarstan. Indeed, Tatarstan is perhaps the
          least extreme and most stable place I have ever visited.
          Rahmat ham sau buligiz,
          Helen Faller >>

          Dear Helen,
          "Moslem Extremism in Tatarstan" is a report distributed on April 10 by the
          French News Agency (AFP). I thought that members of our discussion group
          would be interested to read it. I believe that we should be exposed to all
          points of view, from most pro-Tatar to most anti-Tatar. We have to be aware
          of the whole range of opinions and views regarding Tatarstan.
          Selemner belen,
          Sabirzyan Badretdin

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        • Azat Badretdinov
          Assalaam a aleikum. Being moderator of the idel-ural group I also noticed the negative content of this article. Nevertheless, despite obvious absurd title, the
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 10, 1999
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            Assalaam a'aleikum.

            Being moderator of the idel-ural group I also noticed the negative
            content of this article.

            Nevertheless, despite obvious absurd title, the contents of the article
            are much more objective.

            As far as I know Sufism is quite a heretical tradition in Islam because
            it implies extremely passive approach to social life.

            Historically, our major religious movement was jadidism, which is quite
            different from Wahhabiyya.

            Azat.

            Helen Marie McIntosh Faller wrote:
            >
            > Isenmesez,
            >
            > Would you please be so kind as to tell me who wrote this article? It seems
            > to be authored by someone who is anti-Tatarstan. I know there is a
            > tendency among Western journalists to equate Islam with jihad and
            > Morrocans with Indonesians. The tenor of this piece of writing in no way
            > echos my own experience in Tatarstan. Indeed, Tatarstan is perhaps the
            > least extreme and most stable place I have ever visited.
            >
            > Rahmat ham sau buligiz,
            >
            > Helen Faller
            >
            > On Sat, 10 Apr 1999 SabirzyanB@... wrote:
            >
            > > Moslem Extremism Threatens Stabilitity of Russian Republic Tatarstan
            > >
            > > KAZAN, Russia, April 10 (AFP) - Moslem militancy is steadily gaining ground
            > > in Tatarstan threatening the peaceful co-existence of the Russian and Tatar
            > > communities here and the stability of this mainly Moslem republic of federal
            > > Russia.
            > > In a sign of the authorities' growing concern, Tatarstan's President Mintimer
            > > Shaimiyev in March denounced the "emissaries from Islamic countries who
            > > recruit young men in Russia to give them military strength abroad".
            > >
            > > In recent months, many Pakistani "missionaries" have been expelled from
            > > Tatarstan for engaging in "illegal activities", including calling for a holy
            > > war, according to informed sources in the Tatar capital Kazan, 850 kilometres
            > > (500 miles) from Moscow.
            > >
            > > The fear is that these "missionaries" along with students from Koranic
            > > universities in Syria, Saudi Arabia, Libya and Egypt "are introducing foreign
            > > ideas of Sunni thinking here, says Tatarstan's Moslem spiritual leader Gusman
            > > Hazrat Iskhakov.
            > >
            > > "It is difficult to get an idea of the number of Wahhabis (who don't
            > > recognise the official Islam)" or those who follow the Sufi (ascetic, mystic)
            > > tradition," added Iskhakov, while adding that the numbers were small compared
            > > to the total of two million Moslems in Tatarstan which has a population of
            > > 3.8 million.
            > >
            > > "Today the Wahhabis are not very dangerous but the situation could change
            > > rapidly as they recruit in poor regions of the country, where the population
            > > doesn't know any better and is receptive," to their methods said a worshipper
            > > at the Nourulla mosque in central Kazan, who said he was close to the
            > > Wahhabis.
            > >
            > > The Wahhabis, conservative Moslems who strictly follow the Koran's teaching,
            > > could offer strong support to ultra-nationalists seeking an independent
            > > Tatarstan, such as the Tatar Public Centre.
            > >
            > > Last December, Rafis Kashapov, the group's leader in Naberezhnyye Chelny, in
            > > eastern Tatarstan, announced the sending of Wahhabi volunteers to Chechnya
            > > and Iraq "to fight for Allah and Islam".
            > >
            > > Sizeable Wahhabi groups have developed in Chechnya and another Russian
            > > republic Dagestan in the Russian Caucasus, as well as in several central Asia
            > > republics including Uzbekistan.
            > >
            > > The Tatar Centre in Naberezhnyye Chelny, east of Kazan, opposed the
            > > construction of an Orthodox church near a mosque, said Tatarstan's Orthodox
            > > Archbishop Monsignor Anastassi. Some 48 percent of Tatarstan's inhabitants
            > > are Russians, from the Orthodox tradition.
            > >
            > > Speaking up for "the persecuted Albanian Moslems" the Tatar Centre called
            > > this month for volunteers to fight in Kosovo against the Serb forces.
            > >
            > > The authorities here have, so far, managed to maintain the peaceful
            > > coexistance of the Orthodox Russians and the Moslem Tatars, offering equal
            > > aid to the two communities to rebuild their churches and mosques after the
            > > vicissitudes of Stalinism.
            > >
            > > Relations between the Moslem and Orthodox hierarchies are excellent, Iskhakov
            > > and Anastassi stress, invoking the traditions of mutual tolerance between
            > > Tatarstan's two main communities.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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            > > Exclusive discounts from the hottest online bookstores
            > > Join Now! http://clickhere.egroups.com/click/20
            > >
            > >
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            > >
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          • Selihmet, Ravil
            ... The person conducting the interview, claiming to have come from Paris, and spoke good Russian however with a slight foreign accent was Nikol Militovich
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 11, 1999
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              Helen Marie McIntosh Faller wrote:
              >
              > Isenmesez,
              >
              > Would you please be so kind as to tell me who wrote this article? It seems
              > to be authored by someone who is anti-Tatarstan. I know there is a
              > tendency among Western journalists to equate Islam with jihad and
              > Morrocans with Indonesians. The tenor of this piece of writing in no way
              > echos my own experience in Tatarstan. Indeed, Tatarstan is perhaps the
              > least extreme and most stable place I have ever visited.
              >
              > Rahmat ham sau buligiz,
              >
              > Helen Faller
              >
              > On Sat, 10 Apr 1999 SabirzyanB@... wrote:
              >
              > > Moslem Extremism Threatens Stabilitity of Russian Republic Tatarstan
              > >
              > > KAZAN, Russia, April 10 (AFP) - Moslem militancy is steadily gaining ground
              > > in Tatarstan threatening the peaceful co-existence of the Russian and Tatar
              > > communities here and the stability of this mainly Moslem republic of federal
              > > Russia.
              > > In a sign of the authorities' growing concern, Tatarstan's President Mintimer
              > > Shaimiyev in March denounced the "emissaries from Islamic countries who
              > > recruit young men in Russia to give them military strength abroad".
              > >
              > > In recent months, many Pakistani "missionaries" have been expelled from
              > > Tatarstan for engaging in "illegal activities", including calling for a holy
              > > war, according to informed sources in the Tatar capital Kazan, 850 kilometres
              > > (500 miles) from Moscow.
              > >
              > > The fear is that these "missionaries" along with students from Koranic
              > > universities in Syria, Saudi Arabia, Libya and Egypt "are introducing foreign
              > > ideas of Sunni thinking here, says Tatarstan's Moslem spiritual leader Gusman
              > > Hazrat Iskhakov.
              > >
              > > "It is difficult to get an idea of the number of Wahhabis (who don't
              > > recognise the official Islam)" or those who follow the Sufi (ascetic, mystic)
              > > tradition," added Iskhakov, while adding that the numbers were small compared
              > > to the total of two million Moslems in Tatarstan which has a population of
              > > 3.8 million.
              > >
              > > "Today the Wahhabis are not very dangerous but the situation could change
              > > rapidly as they recruit in poor regions of the country, where the population
              > > doesn't know any better and is receptive," to their methods said a worshipper
              > > at the Nourulla mosque in central Kazan, who said he was close to the
              > > Wahhabis.
              > >
              > > The Wahhabis, conservative Moslems who strictly follow the Koran's teaching,
              > > could offer strong support to ultra-nationalists seeking an independent
              > > Tatarstan, such as the Tatar Public Centre.
              > >
              > > Last December, Rafis Kashapov, the group's leader in Naberezhnyye Chelny, in
              > > eastern Tatarstan, announced the sending of Wahhabi volunteers to Chechnya
              > > and Iraq "to fight for Allah and Islam".
              > >
              > > Sizeable Wahhabi groups have developed in Chechnya and another Russian
              > > republic Dagestan in the Russian Caucasus, as well as in several central Asia
              > > republics including Uzbekistan.
              > >
              > > The Tatar Centre in Naberezhnyye Chelny, east of Kazan, opposed the
              > > construction of an Orthodox church near a mosque, said Tatarstan's Orthodox
              > > Archbishop Monsignor Anastassi. Some 48 percent of Tatarstan's inhabitants
              > > are Russians, from the Orthodox tradition.
              > >
              > > Speaking up for "the persecuted Albanian Moslems" the Tatar Centre called
              > > this month for volunteers to fight in Kosovo against the Serb forces.
              > >
              > > The authorities here have, so far, managed to maintain the peaceful
              > > coexistance of the Orthodox Russians and the Moslem Tatars, offering equal
              > > aid to the two communities to rebuild their churches and mosques after the
              > > vicissitudes of Stalinism.
              > >
              > > Relations between the Moslem and Orthodox hierarchies are excellent, Iskhakov
              > > and Anastassi stress, invoking the traditions of mutual tolerance between
              > > Tatarstan's two main communities.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
              > > eGroups eLerts!
              > > Exclusive discounts from the hottest online bookstores
              > > Join Now! http://clickhere.egroups.com/click/20
              > >
              > >
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              > >
              > >
              >
              > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
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              The person conducting the interview, claiming to have come from Paris,
              and spoke good Russian however with a slight foreign accent was Nikol
              Militovich (sp?) He was told by the group that he interviewed that
              Tatars practiced pure Islam and that there was no Wahhabis movement in
              Tatarstan.
              In addition to the two sujects which appeared in France Press ,those
              interviewed, reiterated the Tatar people's support of the Kosovars and
              also spoke about need of closer cooperation of all Turkik Nations. I
              note that Militovich decided not to write about the latter two subjects
              Regards
              Ravil Selihmet

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            • Helen Marie McIntosh Faller
              ... Dear Sabirzyan afendi, Thank you for answering my question. I couldn t agree with you more that members of the discussion group should be made aware of all
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 11, 1999
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                On Sat, 10 Apr 1999 SabirzyanB@... wrote:

                > In a message dated 99-04-10 21:07:21 EDT, Hellen Faller wrote:
                >
                > << Isenmesez,
                > Would you please be so kind as to tell me who wrote this article? It seems
                > to be authored by someone who is anti-Tatarstan. I know there is a
                > tendency among Western journalists to equate Islam with jihad and
                > Morrocans with Indonesians. The tenor of this piece of writing in no way
                > echos my own experience in Tatarstan. Indeed, Tatarstan is perhaps the
                > least extreme and most stable place I have ever visited.
                > Rahmat ham sau buligiz,
                > Helen Faller >>
                >
                > Dear Helen,
                > "Moslem Extremism in Tatarstan" is a report distributed on April 10 by the
                > French News Agency (AFP). I thought that members of our discussion group
                > would be interested to read it. I believe that we should be exposed to all
                > points of view, from most pro-Tatar to most anti-Tatar. We have to be aware
                > of the whole range of opinions and views regarding Tatarstan.
                > Selemner belen,
                > Sabirzyan Badretdin


                Dear Sabirzyan afendi,

                Thank you for answering my question. I couldn't agree with you more that
                members of the discussion group should be made aware of all
                perspectives on Tatars, orientalist or otherwise. I would like it to be
                perfectly clear that I was not questioning whether the article should have
                been posted, but rather curious about its provenience.

                Tagy ber martebe rahmat dip aitam.

                Sau buligiz,

                Helen Faller

                >
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