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Re: Fluid Architecture

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  • zjl13
    fluid architecture seems to refer to a flowing feeling you get from curve or free form structures, imho, while movement is another thing. calatrava has tried
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 22, 2004
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      fluid architecture seems to refer to a flowing feeling you get from
      curve or free form structures, imho, while movement is another
      thing. calatrava has tried and successfully related fluidity with
      movement with his shadow machine and milwaukee art museum- which
      features a winglike finned sunscreen that can be raised and lowered
      to control the temperature/sunlight of the glass walled reception
      area.

      sonnyLabay


      --- In talkinaboutarchitecture@yahoogroups.com, manzer mirkar
      <entartis@y...> wrote:
      > Interesting,
      >
      > We were having a general discussion at UCLA a few days back
      regarding the interpretation of motion in Architecture... we came to
      the conclusion that the term 'motion' in the architectural context
      today has a referential meaning than a literal one... which
      according to me is sad.
      >
      > Gehry's architecture is termed as frozen motion... I agree, his
      forms strongly read as objects paused in motion. So does Hadid's and
      Libeskind's to an extent. Greg Lynn has done some work in the same
      field too; but if any of the architects are asked about actual
      motion as a characteristic of their building, the answer would be to
      a great extent unanimous- "ofcourse the building cannot move, its
      architecture after all"!
      >
      > To me thats unfortunate; as an architect with the latest digital
      capabilities in terms of animation software and technology in terms
      of structural innovation we should be far away into the future
      already; Architecture lacks the exponential progression seen in the
      other fields today; there are many universities out there that are
      doing a lot of ground breaking research in technology- Cornell,
      Columbia, AA ...(UCLA to an extent), and a lot more beyond these
      obvious names. We have greats lecturing us at institutes- Gehry,
      Hadid, Mayne, Greg Lynn, Eissenman, so on and so forth. With such
      input and resources there should certainly be something out there on
      the subject.
      >
      > I'm sure that there must be some research pertaining to the
      application of actual motion in architecture out there and I'd be
      very interested to look at anything relating to it. I am also
      interested in this topic but have myself not done much research on
      it.
      >
      > An inspiration I refer to from time to time is Calatrava, He is
      one designer who has pushed the realm of architecture on to a
      completely different level. I refer to him as an equivalent to Gaudi
      who too was a visionary for his time.
      >
      > Calatrava has some work pertaining to motion in architecture-
      small scale (the shadow machine) to more large scale projects. I
      also understand that he had done his Phd in the subject of motion in
      architecture... I might be wrong in that, but he sure is one to look
      out for!
      >
      > It would really be great to see built architecture that
      incorporated motion dynamic as part of its function... till that we
      can only dream!!!
      >
      > - manzer mirkar
      >
      >
      > hannahhux <hannahhux@y...> wrote:
      >
      > Do not forget Concert Halls. Architecture's response to music and
      > dance. Frank Gehry's Disney Hall in L.A. is a dynamic example of
      > architecture in motion. Good luck.
      >
      >
      > --- In talkinaboutarchitecture@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff"
      <jsryan@v...>
      > wrote:
      > > I am a student of architecture at Virginia Tech and my work has
      > > brought me to the motion of architecture. Architecture can do
      > > many things known and unknown but I am searching for thoughts
      > > about movment. The dance of Architecture. The concept cube
      > > model that I am working with contains pin connections on its
      > > walls which allows them to move up and down. Thoughts
      > > on the subject would be appreciated as well as any architectual
      > > studies on movment (light, sound, or other wise)
      > >
      > > I have reached the point where I know but I do not understand.
      > > It is through architecture that we are allowed to grow
      > > thank you
    • pickie23
      hi i am a student of architecture. and i was planning to do my seminar dessertation nthesis on fluid architecture... architecture that moves with time..! the
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 12, 2005
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        hi i am a student of architecture.
        and i was planning to do my seminar dessertation nthesis on fluid
        architecture... architecture that moves with time..!
        the buildings that we make r static.. i am interested in making a
        building with pivots,hinges,steel sections that are movable.! thats
        the basic idea.

        Well i do need help! and thats why i am here!! any sort of links to
        websites .. or any info will be greatly appreciated!

        Thanks
        Ak
      • manzer mirkar
        Fluid, Moving, Flexible, Animated Architecture… Motion in architecture has been a big discussion in architecture for some time now; unfortunately most of the
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 13, 2005
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          Fluid, Moving, Flexible, Animated Architecture…
          Motion in architecture has been a big discussion in
          architecture for some time now; unfortunately most of
          the 'animated' architecture produced today is more
          about the notion of motion rather than actual
          animation. What follows below is from my own
          accumulation on the same interest- architecture that
          can move- fluid architecture, something I call-
          TRANSFORMATIVE ARCHITECTURE.

          CAPTURING MOTION IN FORM
          Hadid’s architecture best describes a static
          architecture which tries to deliver some sense of
          motion, her paintings are still better examples than
          her built projects. Many other architects such as Greg
          Lynn have expressed an interest in the ‘animation’
          (not motion) of architecture, his book- Animate Form
          exemplifies on this theory. Then there is the
          Guggenheim in Bilbao by Gehry, this project also
          delivers a notion of movement, but here the concept is
          jumped a slight notch higher. The titanium panels used
          for the cladding are approximately 2ft by 3ft in size
          and just 0.38mm thick. This causes the skin to
          ‘flutter’ on windy days, a fluttering that can be
          perceived by the human eye, a fluttering that causes
          an animation of the skin. Unfortunately all these
          examples do not incorporate an actual movement in the
          building.

          MOVING PARTS THAT ARE PART OF A LARGER SYSTEM
          Moving into the realm of actual moving parts and you
          will see that there isn’t much to see. Most examples
          aren’t even architectural, they are more engineering
          based. For example, look at the Ocean Dome in Japan or
          the World cup 2002 stadium (again in Japan) or for
          that matter many other examples… these have a large
          moving roof, a first hint at large scale movement
          within a built form. Still not good enough examples,
          these movements aren’t ‘challenged’, they are simple
          two-dimensional transformations that have the
          slightest architectural impact. Then there is another
          segment of architecture where individual components
          within a static system are motive.

          Diller+Scoffidio’s Eyebeam Museum of Art & Technology
          competition 2001 is such an example.
          The actual architecture is static, but an alien detail
          has been added to the program- a robotic spider moves
          on the outside of the facade of the structure, its
          movements are a reaction to the people inside.
          Although not exactly part of the building, its sensor
          motivated movement is in reaction to the program
          within the building and is in fact a part of the whole
          structure.

          A MOVING TRANSFORMING SYSTEM
          Finally to the actual movement of structures,
          transformation in architecture. Try searching for
          examples and there are hardly any left. The only
          architect (that I know of) who actually incorporates
          actual movement in architecture is Santiago Calatrava.
          His sculpture ‘WAVE’ (located at the Southern
          Methodist University in Dallas, Texas) is a good
          example of movement. The best example I think is his
          Milwaukee Art Museum’s Quadracci Pavillion, it
          incorporates louvered sunscreens (a movable wing) that
          rise from the building like giant wings and move to
          control light. If it is ever possible to get your
          hands on the mechanics behind his projects, like the
          use of hydraulics or gears, then this would be the
          place to start.

          NOX has come close to a moving architecture,
          unfortunately they have used their concept only to
          create a flexible mould. A rubber like sheet is used
          as the surface (skin), below this at regular intervals
          pistons are attached. The pistons can then be
          ‘tweaked’ within a certain degree of flexibility to
          alter the rubber surface; the rubber surface can
          transform itself within the limits of its
          ‘stretchability’ into various forms. What NOX has done
          is used this concept to form a flexi-mould that can
          transform itself to become a cast for several
          different surface forms. The book ‘Machining
          Architecture’ describes this process.

          FANTASY
          There are so few examples that inspiration has to be
          drawn from un-real environments. Watch ‘Transformers
          the movie’ and you will witness a whole city
          transforming itself into a more ‘attack ready’
          environment. Or watch the veritechs in ‘Robotech’
          transform from aircraft to robots. As unreal these
          seem, there is some semblance to the concepts behind
          such fantasy. The designers behind these cartoons work
          on a much serious, almost practical level than what
          the cartoons show; a lot on the concept of moving
          parts, transformable elements, use of hydraulics or
          other force-application systems can be understood by
          giving a second look at the making of such concepts.

          THE PAST AND THE FUTURE
          ARCHIGRAM had proposed the ‘Walking City’ and the
          lesser known ‘Auto Environment’, both incorporated
          actual movement. The past has thought of movement and
          the future is too. Some of the craziest ideas of
          movement can be found in the proposals possible by
          Nano-technology. A scenario where nano-bots are
          constantly deconstructing and reconstructing a built
          form to suit the purpose of that exact moment in time.


          Well, almost all of the above isn’t very useful when
          it comes to the actual application of movement, but I
          hope it helps. Ofcourse there are other issues about
          movement- how practical it is or how affordable, how
          necessary it is, but I think these are secondary
          issues over the fact that it is possible and in what
          ways it is possible.
          Attached here is a gif animation of my own final year
          (construction) project, something I almost got failed
          for because of its non-practicality. The movement in
          this project was achieved using hydraulic pistons
          although gears would have been more suited.

          Best of Luck!

          - manzer




          __________________________________________________________
          Yahoo! India Matrimony: Find your partner now. Go to http://yahoo.shaadi.com

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • kaushik_83_00
          even before i question the practicality of your thesis topic, i would like to ask, why fluid architecture at all? but then as manzar says, the topic of fluid
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 14, 2005
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            even before i question the practicality of your thesis topic, i would
            like to ask, why fluid architecture at all? but then as manzar says,
            the topic of fluid architecture has to a large extent been conceptual
            and never been proved right...
          • subgenius691
            sounds like you are in danger of trying to revisit modular architecture, or rather that you are trying defy the first rule of building ----the foundation. it
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 20, 2005
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              sounds like you are in danger of trying to revisit "modular"
              architecture, or rather that you are trying defy the first rule of
              building ----the foundation. it may seem that you are trying to design
              something in anticipation of a future "retrofit"....much like we say
              the clever re-use of warehouses in modern days.
              i suggest you look at LeCorbusier's design in the stuttgart, germany
              housing design at Weißenhofsiedlung. He utilized movable partitions and
              such....etc..
              i would make observation......at what point does this fluidity deny
              itself of ever being anything at all?....perhaps fluid architecture is
              better seen thru building types rather than a singular building?

              good luck


              --- In talkinaboutarchitecture@yahoogroups.com, "pickie23"
              <akksis@g...> wrote:
              >
              > hi i am a student of architecture.
              > and i was planning to do my seminar dessertation nthesis on fluid
              > architecture... architecture that moves with time..!
              > the buildings that we make r static.. i am interested in making a
              > building with pivots,hinges,steel sections that are movable.! thats
              > the basic idea.
              >
              > Well i do need help! and thats why i am here!! any sort of links to
              > websites .. or any info will be greatly appreciated!
              >
              > Thanks
              > Ak
              >
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