Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: How do I . . . "spot finishing(?)" on aluminum

Expand Messages
  • sikn1gh7
    I ve seen the terms jeweling and engine turning used for refering to the spirit of st louis finish, I believe the term Jeweling is prefered . Engine
    Message 1 of 16 , Apr 30, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      I've seen the terms jeweling and engine turning used for refering to
      the "spirit of st louis" finish, I believe the term "Jeweling" is
      prefered". Engine turning, depending on the background of the
      machinist you ask, can refer to cutting decorative patterns on
      a "rose engine", or "Decorative lathe", which uses a single point
      cutting tool to cut patterns like a spirograph. This is often found
      on antique (1800s) pocket watch covers.

      Of course, with the advent of CNC, BOTH can now be done easily on a
      CNC mill. My robotics team had *some* luck doing a quick and dirty
      jeweling of aluminum, using a felt bob (used on dremels for
      polishing), and some 800 grit lapping compound. The bob was just
      chucked up in an 1/8" collet, and the machine was programmed to lower
      the head about 0.020" below the surface of the piece, dwell for 5
      seconds, up and repeat. Someone with a bit of time, a good eye for
      design, and some programming skills can probably write something to
      generate coordinate points that simulate a spirograph's movement.
      (Hrm, interesting problem, actually).

      I've heard that mustard jar lids and wine corks also works great for
      holding the lapping compound.

      Relevant Links:

      Jewelry techniques:
      http://users.lmi.net/~drewid/

      Rose engine work:
      http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/jeharr/rosengin.htm
      http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/jeharr/ecc_patt.htm
      http://www.rgmwatches.com/engine99.html

      Jeweling work:
      http://www.angelfire.com/sports/customjewelshop/rifles.html
      http://www.cs.ucr.edu/~eamonn/et/et.htm

      Hope this helps!

      -=- Terence
    • Bill Brady
      Ed Chesnut Wrote: I am envisioning setting up on a large drill press with a 3/8 or 1/2 copper or aluminum rod chucked up (faced end). Charge the end of the
      Message 2 of 16 , May 1, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        Ed Chesnut Wrote:

        I am envisioning setting up on a large drill press with a 3/8" or
        1/2" copper or aluminum rod chucked up (faced end). Charge the end
        of the rod with valve grinding compound or some other abrasive and
        touch down on the aluminum panel. Then use the x-y table to
        traverse 1/2 diameter and touch down again. Is this even remotely
        on the right track?
        -------------------------------------
        I believe you are after what is called a "machine finish". I have read that
        the procedure you outline above is the correct way except you use a wood
        dowel charged with abrasive. I have done this myself with some success. I
        have also used small fiberglass brushes called "Rush Erasers" for small
        spots. Currently Micro-Mark is selling even smaller fiberglass brushes which
        I also have.

        Good Luck

        -- --Wm. "Bill" Brady, Harwood MD 38°51'30"N 76°41'00"W-- Firewood warms you
        twice, once when you burn it and once when you cut it.




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein
        http://www.goldmachinery.com/antique.html They often put machines up on Ebay. felice@casco.net is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. See our web pages
        Message 3 of 16 , May 1, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          http://www.goldmachinery.com/antique.html
          They often put machines up on Ebay.
          felice@... is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. See our web pages
          http://www.cartertools.com/nfhome.html

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Tom Benedict" <benedict@...>
          To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wednesday, April 30, 2003 6:51 PM
          Subject: Re: [taigtools] Re: How do I . . . "spot finishing(?)" on aluminum


          >
          > I've now seen two rosette engines come up on ebay. One was a traditional
          > lathe with eccentric chuck and rosette cams. I forget what it went for.
          > I think it was over ten thousand. The other was a linear rosette engine
          > that looked like a cross between a shaper (turned vertically) and a
          > traditional rosette engine that was unrolled (it had linear cams). That
          > one went for even more. I've never seen mention of such a beast since.
        • Bill Brady
          Bill Brady Wrote: I believe you are after what is called a machine finish . ... I correct myself, it s called engine turning or engine finish . -- --Wm.
          Message 4 of 16 , May 1, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            Bill Brady Wrote:

            I believe you are after what is called a "machine finish".
            ----------------------------
            I correct myself, it's called "engine turning" or "engine finish".

            -- --Wm. "Bill" Brady, Harwood MD 38°51'30"N 76°41'00"W-- Firewood warms you
            twice, once when you burn it and once when you cut it.




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Ed Chesnut
            . . . information. The rose turning machines weren t exactly on target - but it was quite enjoyable to review that information too. Gentlemen, you gave me
            Message 5 of 16 , May 1, 2003
            • 0 Attachment
              . . . information. The rose turning machines weren't exactly on
              target - but it was quite enjoyable to review that information too.

              Gentlemen, you gave me direct answers to many of my unspoken
              questions and strong hints about others. I'm ready to go play, er,
              um, work on the project!

              I've already established that valve grinding compound is better for
              drilling through the aluminum [test piece :-)] than it is for
              polishing. Rubbing compound and wood dowel seem like good
              components/tools. I wonder about gluing a disc of rubber on the end
              of the dowel or rod? Ah, well, here I go.

              Thanks again for all the good responses (and links)!
              Ed
            • Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein
              I will add my experience, I have used a dowel with lapping compound (messy, and a pain), a cratex rod (needs lube but works well) and beartex discs on a
              Message 6 of 16 , May 1, 2003
              • 0 Attachment
                I will add my experience, I have used a dowel with lapping compound (messy,
                and a pain), a cratex rod (needs lube but works well) and beartex discs on a
                mandrel (works best, but loads up with Al and still needs lube). The beartex
                works best as it is spongy and has some spring as well as self renewing.
                I have seen plans for a spring loaded mandrel so you always have pressure.
                felice@... is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. See our web pages
                http://www.cartertools.com/nfhome.html

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Ed Chesnut" <flightgrip@...>
                To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Thursday, May 01, 2003 1:44 PM
                Subject: [taigtools] Re: How do I . . . "spot finishing(?) THANK YOU for the
                wealth of
                > I've already established that valve grinding compound is better for
                > drilling through the aluminum [test piece :-)] than it is for
                > polishing. Rubbing compound and wood dowel seem like good
                > components/tools. I wonder about gluing a disc of rubber on the end
                > of the dowel or rod? Ah, well, here I go.
              • Thomas
                How timely this thread is! I am just about to get into doing the same kind of finish to dress up the knurling tool that I am making :) I am planning to use a
                Message 7 of 16 , May 1, 2003
                • 0 Attachment
                  How timely this thread is! I am just about to get into doing the
                  same kind of finish to dress up the knurling tool that I am
                  making :) I am planning to use a 1/4 cylindrical abrasive india
                  stone.
                  btw, I have also seen this technique called demascening...
                  Thomas
                • Steve Blackmore
                  ... Wrongly :( Damascening the art of decorating iron, steel, or bronze with inlaid threads of gold or silver, or producing a watered effect in forging, as in
                  Message 8 of 16 , May 1, 2003
                  • 0 Attachment
                    On Thu, 01 May 2003 21:42:01 -0000, you wrote:

                    >How timely this thread is! I am just about to get into doing the
                    >same kind of finish to dress up the knurling tool that I am
                    >making :) I am planning to use a 1/4 cylindrical abrasive india
                    >stone.
                    > btw, I have also seen this technique called demascening...

                    Wrongly :(

                    Damascening
                    the art of decorating iron, steel, or bronze with inlaid threads of
                    gold or silver, or producing a watered effect in forging, as in sword
                    blades, gun barrels, and various metal objects. The method, long
                    practised in the Middle East as well as in China and Japan, was highly
                    developed in Italy. The inlay forms a delicate and intricate pattern
                    upon the contrasting background. The whole fabric is penetrated by the
                    ornamental treatment, so that grinding does not remove it.

                    I've seen guns with effects ranging from "wood grain" to barley twist
                    patterns and there are some superb ornamental examples in the Royal
                    Armories.

                    It was originally done to incorporate very expensive pure iron and
                    alloys, with cheap stuff, but still produce a viable weapon that
                    wouldn't break. The ornamental examples followed as a lucrative
                    sideline.

                    --
                    Steve Blackmore
                  • Thomas
                    I was aware of d-A-mascening, but jewelling/engine-turning is also referred to as d-E-mascening, at least according to the Eastwood Co. website:
                    Message 9 of 16 , May 2, 2003
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I was aware of d-A-mascening, but jewelling/engine-turning is also
                      referred to as d-E-mascening, at least according to the Eastwood Co.
                      website:
                      http://www.eastwoodco.com/aspfiles/lib/instructions/eng_turn.asp?UID=

                      Are they misinformed? I could have sworn I'd seen the term used
                      elsewhere as well ;) And why did you put Spam Alert in the header of
                      your message? I wasn't trying to sell anything, loL!
                      Thomas

                      > Wrongly :(
                      >
                      > Damascening
                      > the art of decorating iron, steel, or bronze with inlaid threads of
                      > gold or silver, or producing a watered effect in forging, as in
                      sword
                      > blades, gun barrels, and various metal objects. The method, long
                      > practised in the Middle East as well as in China and Japan, was
                      highly
                      > developed in Italy. The inlay forms a delicate and intricate pattern
                      > upon the contrasting background. The whole fabric is penetrated by
                      the
                      > ornamental treatment, so that grinding does not remove it.
                      >
                      > I've seen guns with effects ranging from "wood grain" to barley
                      twist
                      > patterns and there are some superb ornamental examples in the Royal
                      > Armories.
                      >
                      > It was originally done to incorporate very expensive pure iron and
                      > alloys, with cheap stuff, but still produce a viable weapon that
                      > wouldn't break. The ornamental examples followed as a lucrative
                      > sideline.
                      >
                      > --
                      > Steve Blackmore
                    • David Carter
                      ... A quick Google search indicates that they are the only website using this term in this manner:
                      Message 10 of 16 , May 2, 2003
                      • 0 Attachment
                        >> -----Original Message-----
                        >> From: Thomas [mailto:penitent75@...]
                        >> Sent: Friday, May 02, 2003 10:48 AM
                        >>
                        >> I was aware of d-A-mascening, but jewelling/engine-turning is also
                        >> referred to as d-E-mascening, at least according to the Eastwood Co.
                        >> website:
                        >> http://www.eastwoodco.com/aspfiles/lib/instructions/eng_turn.asp?UID=
                        >>
                        >> Are they misinformed? 

                        A quick Google search indicates that they are the only website using this
                        term in this manner:

                        http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&ie=ISO-8859-1&q=demascening+turning

                        Note Google also asks if I really meant "damascening turning".

                        - David Carter
                      • Steve Blackmore
                        ... They sure are, and as is tradition with a lot of American words, can t spell ;) Stupid anti-virus program must have picked up the capitals bit as a
                        Message 11 of 16 , May 2, 2003
                        • 0 Attachment
                          On Fri, 02 May 2003 14:48:05 -0000, you wrote:

                          >I was aware of d-A-mascening, but jewelling/engine-turning is also
                          >referred to as d-E-mascening, at least according to the Eastwood Co.
                          >website:
                          >http://www.eastwoodco.com/aspfiles/lib/instructions/eng_turn.asp?UID=
                          >
                          >Are they misinformed? I could have sworn I'd seen the term used
                          >elsewhere as well ;) And why did you put Spam Alert in the header of
                          >your message? I wasn't trying to sell anything, loL!
                          >Thomas

                          They sure are, and as is tradition with a lot of " American" words,
                          can't spell ;)

                          Stupid anti-virus program must have picked up the capitals bit as a
                          "spam" email, and I never noticed - sorry about that.

                          --
                          Steve Blackmore
                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.