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mounting a 14mm end mill

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  • pt_green
    Hi all, kind of a wierd question - looking for input here. Problem: I want to buy a 14mm end mill and mount it on a drilling tailstock. Reason: I want to cut
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 3, 2002
      Hi all,

      kind of a wierd question - looking for input here.

      Problem: I want to buy a 14mm end mill and mount it on a drilling
      tailstock.

      Reason: I want to cut down the time it take me to create a 14mm hole
      in a flanged bushing that I make. I need to make about 40 bushings
      and just being able to drill/mill out the inside without using a
      boring tool will save me alot of time per piece.

      curently, I have to drill a hole with a .25 inch endmill ( I use this
      because it really moves through the aluminum that I use vs a normal
      drill) then I use a boring bar to achieve 14mm inside diameter.



      anyone have a though on how I could best improve my process?

      thanks

      PT
    • Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein
      Drill with a 13.5mm split point 135 deg. drill, possibly parabolic flute. Ream to 14mm That s what I would do. felice@casco.net is Felice Luftschein and
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 3, 2002
        Drill with a 13.5mm split point 135 deg. drill, possibly parabolic flute.
        Ream to 14mm
        That's what I would do.
        felice@... is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. See our web pages
        http://www.cartertools.com/nfhome.html

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "pt_green" <pt_green@...>
        To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, September 03, 2002 4:18 PM
        Subject: [taigtools] mounting a 14mm end mill


        > Hi all,
        >
        > kind of a wierd question - looking for input here.
        >
        > Problem: I want to buy a 14mm end mill and mount it on a drilling
        > tailstock.
        >
        > Reason: I want to cut down the time it take me to create a 14mm hole
        > in a flanged bushing that I make. I need to make about 40 bushings
        > and just being able to drill/mill out the inside without using a
        > boring tool will save me alot of time per piece.
        >
        > curently, I have to drill a hole with a .25 inch endmill ( I use this
        > because it really moves through the aluminum that I use vs a normal
        > drill) then I use a boring bar to achieve 14mm inside diameter.
        >
        >
        >
        > anyone have a though on how I could best improve my process?
        >
        > thanks
        >
        > PT
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@...
        >
        > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-unsubscribe@...
        >
        >
        >
        > Let the chips fly!
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
      • pt_green
        that s what I was first considering as it would cut down on the time, but the added step of changing operations from drilling to reaming is primarily what I am
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 3, 2002
          that's what I was first considering as it would cut down on the time,
          but the added step of changing operations from drilling to reaming is
          primarily what I am trying to avoid (saves even more time).




          --- In taigtools@y..., "Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein"
          <felice@c...> wrote:
          > Drill with a 13.5mm split point 135 deg. drill, possibly parabolic
          flute.
          > Ream to 14mm
          > That's what I would do.
          > felice@c... is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. See our web
          pages
          > http://www.cartertools.com/nfhome.html
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: "pt_green" <pt_green@y...>
          > To: <taigtools@y...>
          > Sent: Tuesday, September 03, 2002 4:18 PM
          > Subject: [taigtools] mounting a 14mm end mill
          >
          >
          > > Hi all,
          > >
          > > kind of a wierd question - looking for input here.
          > >
          > > Problem: I want to buy a 14mm end mill and mount it on a drilling
          > > tailstock.
          > >
          > > Reason: I want to cut down the time it take me to create a 14mm
          hole
          > > in a flanged bushing that I make. I need to make about 40 bushings
          > > and just being able to drill/mill out the inside without using a
          > > boring tool will save me alot of time per piece.
          > >
          > > curently, I have to drill a hole with a .25 inch endmill ( I use
          this
          > > because it really moves through the aluminum that I use vs a
          normal
          > > drill) then I use a boring bar to achieve 14mm inside diameter.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > anyone have a though on how I could best improve my process?
          > >
          > > thanks
          > >
          > > PT
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@e...
          > >
          > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-
          unsubscribe@e...
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Let the chips fly!
          > >
          > >
          > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
          http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          > >
        • Larry Richter
          ... If the accuracy is good enough for the job, and the workpiece is just aluminum, I think you might be able to just make a piece that threads into the chuck
          Message 4 of 11 , Sep 3, 2002
            pt_green wrote:

            > that's what I was first considering as it would cut down on the time,
            > but the added step of changing operations from drilling to reaming is
            > primarily what I am trying to avoid (saves even more time).

            If the accuracy is good enough for the job, and the workpiece is just
            aluminum, I think you might be able to just make a piece that threads into the
            chuck mounting hole, that has a pocket the right diameter on the other end for
            the shaft of the end mill. Set screw or silver solder, or even silver bearing
            solder, or both. If you have some good threaded rod the right size, you could
            make a threaded hole for that on the same centerline instead of threading the
            thing itself for the chuck mounting hole.

            Or, you could just make a whole substitute ram bar for the tailstock, and skip
            the threading and the inaccuracies possible there entirely. You could attach
            the lever arm to the new ram with one of those aircraft latch pins with the
            ballbearing lock if you liked. Maybe. Quicker than a bolt.

            It sounds awful wiggly, but if the accuracy is good enough for the work, and
            the rig turns out safe, well then, maybe just go ahead and do it Uncle
            Clarence's way instead of the modern way...
          • Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein
            They do make combined drill/reamers, if you have a through hole. felice@casco.net is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. See our web pages
            Message 5 of 11 , Sep 3, 2002
              They do make combined drill/reamers, if you have a through hole.
              felice@... is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. See our web pages
              http://www.cartertools.com/nfhome.html

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "pt_green" <pt_green@...>
              To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, September 03, 2002 4:51 PM
              Subject: [taigtools] Re: mounting a 14mm end mill


              > that's what I was first considering as it would cut down on the time,
              > but the added step of changing operations from drilling to reaming is
              > primarily what I am trying to avoid (saves even more time).
            • Peter Homann
              Hi, I had an interesting experience on the weekend. I m converting my lathe to CNC and decided to reduce the thickness of a spare Crosslide Dial Bearing Block
              Message 6 of 11 , Sep 3, 2002
                Hi,
                I had an interesting experience on the weekend. I'm converting my lathe to
                CNC and decided to reduce the thickness of a spare Crosslide Dial Bearing
                Block (part 100-20). The reason for doing this is to expose more of the
                cross slide leadscrew to aid in mounting a pulley onto the leadscrew.

                Anyway, when I went to turn it down using a Taig carbide tipped tool, I
                noticed that the material is very hard. Hard enough to produce the
                occasional spark. First time I've seen that. I've decided the effort in
                gaining an extra 1/16" is not worth it.

                The cross slide screw has a 6-32 thread on the end of it and I want to mount
                an aluminium timing belt pulley with a 1/4" bore to the cross slide screw.
                any ideas?

                I am assuming that the cross slide dial (handle) screws onto the cross slide
                screw until there is no gap between it and the Crosslide Dial Bearing Block,
                then the 6-32 acorn nut is screwed on as a locknut. Is that how it is
                originally constructed.

                To mount the pulley I was thinking of starting of with a 1/4" rod and
                tapping a 6-32 thread in the centre. Then screwing it onto the spare
                leadscrew until there is no slack between it and the Crosslide Dial Bearing
                Block. Then use locktite to ensure a permanent fixture. Any comments.

                My other idea was to made 2 of the tapped 1/4" threaded rods, using the 2nd
                one as a locknut and still use locktite.

                The problem I have is that the threaded shaft on the leadscrew is not very
                long. also I don't want to make a new leadscrew.

                Any comments or ideas would be welcome.


                Cheers,


                Peter Homann
                mailto:Peter.Homann@...
                Adacel Technologies Limited,
                250 Bay St, BRIGHTON, 3186, AUSTRALIA
                http://www.adacel.com <http://www.adacel.com>
                Telephone +61 (3) 8530 7777, Facsimile +61 (3) 9596 2960
                Mobile 0421-601 665
              • Larry Richter
                ... Had a lapse here. This should be threads onto the chuck mounting thread . Sorry.
                Message 7 of 11 , Sep 3, 2002
                  Larry Richter wrote:

                  > pt_green wrote:
                  >
                  > > that's what I was first considering as it would cut down on the time,
                  > > but the added step of changing operations from drilling to reaming is
                  > > primarily what I am trying to avoid (saves even more time).
                  >
                  > If the accuracy is good enough for the job, and the workpiece is just
                  > aluminum, I think you might be able to just make a piece that threads into the
                  > chuck mounting hole

                  Had a lapse here. This should be 'threads onto the chuck mounting thread'. Sorry.
                • Tony Jeffree
                  ... Correct. Regards, Tony
                  Message 8 of 11 , Sep 4, 2002
                    At 11:10 04/09/2002 +1000, you wrote:
                    >I am assuming that the cross slide dial (handle) screws onto the cross slide
                    >screw until there is no gap between it and the Crosslide Dial Bearing Block,
                    >then the 6-32 acorn nut is screwed on as a locknut. Is that how it is
                    >originally constructed.

                    Correct.


                    Regards,
                    Tony
                  • Tony Jeffree
                    ... I would be tempted to replace the bearing block altogether, and design a new one around a couple of small ball bearings; unfortunately, this almost
                    Message 9 of 11 , Sep 4, 2002
                      At 11:10 04/09/2002 +1000, you wrote:
                      >To mount the pulley I was thinking of starting of with a 1/4" rod and
                      >tapping a 6-32 thread in the centre. Then screwing it onto the spare
                      >leadscrew until there is no slack between it and the Crosslide Dial Bearing
                      >Block. Then use locktite to ensure a permanent fixture. Any comments.
                      >
                      >My other idea was to made 2 of the tapped 1/4" threaded rods, using the 2nd
                      >one as a locknut and still use locktite.
                      >
                      >The problem I have is that the threaded shaft on the leadscrew is not very
                      >long. also I don't want to make a new leadscrew.

                      I would be tempted to replace the bearing block altogether, and design a
                      new one around a couple of small ball bearings; unfortunately, this almost
                      certainly means you would have to replace the leadscrew. Main reason for
                      this is that I suspect one of the big problems you will have will be
                      adjusting the bearing block for both minimal backlash and minimal bearing
                      friction. I know that whenever I decide the backlash in the cross-slide is
                      too great & I try to adjust it, I regret starting the job!


                      Regards,
                      Tony
                    • Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein
                      It is hard, you could always anneal it by heating red hot.
                      Message 10 of 11 , Sep 4, 2002
                        It is hard, you could always anneal it by heating red hot.
                      • homannp
                        Hi Tony, Thanks for your reply. Replacing the leadscrew is phase 2 I guess. Once the lathe is converted and functioning well (backlash excluded) I m going to
                        Message 11 of 11 , Sep 4, 2002
                          Hi Tony,
                          Thanks for your reply. Replacing the leadscrew is phase 2 I guess.
                          Once the lathe is converted and functioning well (backlash excluded)
                          I'm going to look at replacing the cross slide leadscrew with a 3/16"
                          ps style leadscrew and anti- backlash nut from Pic Design
                          http://www.pic-design.com

                          I am planning to mount the nut on a plate bolted to the far end of
                          the cross-slide. The downside of this is that the leadscrew will be
                          exposed when the cross slide is closest to the operator(or observer
                          for a CNC lathe:-))

                          Cheers,


                          --- In taigtools@y..., Tony Jeffree <tony@j...> wrote:
                          > At 11:10 04/09/2002 +1000, you wrote:
                          > >To mount the pulley I was thinking of starting of with a 1/4" rod
                          and
                          > >tapping a 6-32 thread in the centre. Then screwing it onto the
                          spare
                          > >leadscrew until there is no slack between it and the Crosslide
                          Dial Bearing
                          > >Block. Then use locktite to ensure a permanent fixture. Any
                          comments.
                          > >
                          > >My other idea was to made 2 of the tapped 1/4" threaded rods,
                          using the 2nd
                          > >one as a locknut and still use locktite.
                          > >
                          > >The problem I have is that the threaded shaft on the leadscrew is
                          not very
                          > >long. also I don't want to make a new leadscrew.
                          >
                          > I would be tempted to replace the bearing block altogether, and
                          design a
                          > new one around a couple of small ball bearings; unfortunately, this
                          almost
                          > certainly means you would have to replace the leadscrew. Main
                          reason for
                          > this is that I suspect one of the big problems you will have will
                          be
                          > adjusting the bearing block for both minimal backlash and minimal
                          bearing
                          > friction. I know that whenever I decide the backlash in the cross-
                          slide is
                          > too great & I try to adjust it, I regret starting the job!
                          >
                          >
                          > Regards,
                          > Tony
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