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Re: [taigtools] Uses

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  • Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter
    ... From: Alexander Newman To: Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2000 3:39 AM Subject: Re: [taigtools] Uses ... Make
    Message 1 of 15 , Apr 5 10:11 AM
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Alexander Newman <anewman@...>
      To: <taigtools@egroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2000 3:39 AM
      Subject: Re: [taigtools] Uses
      > With this fixed, I still have a nagging suspicion that the headstock
      > and tailstock axes might not be parallel, and am wondering how I might
      > test this, apart from attempting to turn between centres
      Make a 60 deg center in the headstock end by chucking a piece of steel and
      turning a 60 deg point
      drill a say 1/2" bar at both ends for centers
      chuck and drive using a simple dog, and turn a small portion near the
      tailstock down. (hereafter called the register)
      mount an indicator on the carriage and indicate on the register. note the
      crosslide reading.
      retract the indicator
      flip the bar end for end (having removed the dog)
      advance the indicator the same amount to bear on the register which is now
      near the headstock
      The difference between the two readings is how far out the tailstock is.
      now just cycle through this, adjusting the tailstock, comparing readings
      between the two areas, until no difference is perceptible.
      note that there is only one register - and it doesn't matter if the rod is
      bent, rusty, etc as long as the register is truned smooth.
      Rudy Kouhoupt wrote about this in an old HSM
    • Alexander Newman
      Hi there Tony & Nick, I m going to print out both your suggestions and mull over them over the weekend. Err...and get to work on that dti clamp! Cheers, Alex.
      Message 2 of 15 , Apr 6 4:50 AM
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        Hi there Tony & Nick,

        I'm going to print out both your suggestions and mull over them over
        the weekend.

        Err...and get to work on that dti clamp!

        Cheers,

        Alex.
      • Alexander Newman
        Thanks, I m digesting this! ... Cheers, Alex.
        Message 3 of 15 , Apr 6 6:09 AM
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          Thanks, I'm digesting this!

          > So, for the perfect result here...
          >
          > 1) Remove any radial misalignment in the headstock (as described in my post)
          >
          > 2) Remove any radial misalignment in the tailstock (as described in my post)
          >
          > 3) Apply Jose's test bar technique to get your now-parallel headstock &
          > tailstock axes to coincide; naturally taking care to ensure that any
          > modifications you make to the tailstock do not re-introduce radial
          > misalignment errors!
          >
          > I think I'll have to give this a go on my own lathe this evening...its been
          > a while since I checked this stuff.

          Cheers,

          Alex.
        • Tony Jeffree
          ... Jose s article is good - however, its worth pointing out that there is no point in doing any work on getting the tailstock aligned with the headstock until
          Message 4 of 15 , Apr 6 7:01 AM
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            At 22:50 06/04/00 +1100, you wrote:
            >Hi there Tony & Nick,
            >
            >I'm going to print out both your suggestions and mull over them over
            >the weekend.
            >
            >Err...and get to work on that dti clamp!

            Jose's article is good - however, its worth pointing out that there is no
            point in doing any work on getting the tailstock aligned with the headstock
            until you have sorted out any problems caused by what Jose refers to as
            "radial mis-alignment" of headstock & tailstock; i.e., fix both of these
            axes so that they are parallel to the ways. His test bar technique assumes
            that the tailstock ram is parallel to the ways, but may be offset from the
            spindle axis (or more particularly, offset from the dead centre that you
            fitted to the spindle); it ignores any possible mis-alignment between the
            spindle axis itself and the lathe bed. Hence, if your headstock and/or
            tailstock axes are not parallel to the ways (in vertical & horizontal
            planes), then the test bar technique will allow you to align the centres of
            the headstock & tailstock perfectly, but ONLY for the specific extension of
            the tailstock that you use in the test, and ONLY for the length of overhang
            of the centre in the headstock. You would find that at a different length,
            or when using a longer/shorter centre, the alignment would no longer be
            perfect.

            So, for the perfect result here...

            1) Remove any radial misalignment in the headstock (as described in my post)

            2) Remove any radial misalignment in the tailstock (as described in my post)

            3) Apply Jose's test bar technique to get your now-parallel headstock &
            tailstock axes to coincide; naturally taking care to ensure that any
            modifications you make to the tailstock do not re-introduce radial
            misalignment errors!

            I think I'll have to give this a go on my own lathe this evening...its been
            a while since I checked this stuff.

            Regards,
            Tony
          • Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter
            ... From: Tony Jeffree To: Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2000 7:01 AM Subject: Re: [taigtools] Uses ... post) I talked
            Message 5 of 15 , Apr 6 10:23 AM
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              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Tony Jeffree <tony@...>
              To: <taigtools@egroups.com>
              Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2000 7:01 AM
              Subject: Re: [taigtools] Uses
              > 1) Remove any radial misalignment in the headstock (as described in my
              post)
              I talked to Forrest about this a while back - if you overtighten the
              headstock clamp screws, you can misalign the headstock, by squeezing the
              extrusion - although we don't want to have the headstock move, there's no
              need for the screws to be tighter than the standard allen wrench will make
              them (so don't use a cheater on it!)
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