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Re: Manual CNC

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  • Ken Jenkins
    I ve done similar things in the past using a DRO on a mill and a list of X,Y moves (I also wrote a 6809 dis-assembler once entirely in HEX on a yellow pad and
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 30, 2002
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      I've done similar things in the past using a DRO on a mill
      and a list of X,Y moves (I also wrote a 6809 dis-assembler once
      entirely in HEX on a yellow pad and thus inoculated myself
      against any future tedious task I was ever likely to encounter
      ... and ... no ... it didn't run the first time it was loaded).

      You should be able to do what you want to do by drawing your
      profile in a CAD program using Bezier curves then convert
      to polylines (as much resolution as you can stand :-P ).
      Export as a DXF and convert to a G-code file. The
      G-code file will be a simple text file and have all the
      X,Y moves. Even if you don't have much programming experience,
      writing a program to read the G-code text lines, parse the
      X,Y data out and generate specific "handwheel moves" then
      spit them out to an output text file would be very easy.
      All this can be done with public domain software components
      available on the net.

      Ken





      > Date: Mon, 29 Apr 2002 20:07:14 -0400
      > From: "Daniel Munoz" <dmunoz@...>
      > Subject: Manual CNC
      >
      > I have a lazy idea, and would like to have your comments on it.
      >
      > What about a graphic interface that could describe, both graphically and
      > numerically a piece to be cut on the lathe. Just like the programs used
      > in 3D design, you give a profile, and then a surface of revolution
      > spinning around the main axis is defined.
    • Larry Richter
      ... I m out of date as to the nature of anti-backlash nuts. They were once reasonable in small sizes. Most I ve seen or shopped took the form of two more or
      Message 2 of 5 , May 11 6:06 AM
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        stonecutter78412 wrote:

        > Hey all,
        > How expensive are anti-backlash components? Can you swap out the 3
        > axis threads with anti-backlash components? I have issues. heh.
        >
        > Vince in Corpus Christi

        I'm out of date as to the nature of anti-backlash nuts. They were once
        reasonable in small sizes. Most I've seen or shopped took the form of two more
        or less standard nuts in one housing, one fixed, one movable, with the
        distance between the two nuts being variable. Some were more like shims for
        threads -- they were manually adjusted, and if the variation from spec in the
        threaded rod they served was a uniform variance, good enough on shake removal.
        Some had a spring element between the two nuts, and were backlash proof only
        up to a given load, at which point the spring failed to produce backlash
        removal. I expect there are plenty of other and better ways. It's possible to
        make them.
      • thosmurray
        I am wondering if anyone has been successful in installing commercial anti-backlash nuts (with the corresponding acme screws and bearings) in a Taig mill? The
        Message 3 of 5 , May 12 9:44 AM
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          I am wondering if anyone has been successful in installing commercial
          anti-backlash nuts (with the corresponding acme screws and bearings)
          in a Taig mill? The anti-backlash product that I am thinking of is
          the cam-type nuts that BSA offers.

          I would like to get started on a CNC mill, and I am weighing my
          options. I really wanted to build my own, but as time grows shorter,
          I am now considering retro-fitting a commercially available unit. The
          mill will be used to machine jewelry models in wax primarily, but I
          would like the option to machine aluminum and brass, possibly steel.

          The unit I use at work has BSA anti-backlash nuts, and I am pleased
          with the results that we get. I am hoping I can install them on the
          Taig mill.

          Thanks,
          Tom Murray
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