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Some simple lathe additions

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  • Leon Heller
    The Peatol mounting plate I use for my lathe and motor is a bit awkward, as it has the motor support plate mounting studs protruding from the underside. Until
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 1, 2002
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      The Peatol mounting plate I use for my lathe and motor is a bit awkward, as
      it has the motor support plate mounting studs protruding from the underside.
      Until recently I just rested the thing on a couple of pieces of wood, but it
      wasn't very secure, and the whole thing tended to slide about a bit. I went
      to my local Maplin Electronics emporium and purchased four of the largest
      circular rubber mounting feet they had. They are nice and robust with steel
      inserts. They wouldn't raise the plate enough for the studs, so I made some
      spacers from a piece of 1 1/8" Al round bar, turning them to length and
      drilling a 6 mm hole to match the rubber feet. I drilled corresponding holes
      in the mounting plate and fitted them. It now looks very neat, vibrates less
      and is extremely stable.

      When drilling the spacers I got fed up with the drill lever hurting my hand
      and decided to do something about it. The lever appeared to be 1/2" wide and
      my usual metal supplier had some 5/8" OD steel tubing that he thought would
      have about the correct ID, so I purchased a piece, and cut off about 7". The
      lever was slightly too wide for the tubing, so I filed it down a bit until
      the tube was a nice push fit. Problem solved!

      When I removed the lever, a bit of the split-pin securing it to the
      tailstock spindle broke off, so I turned a little shouldered pin out of a
      short piece of MS to replace it - much neater. I never liked that split-pin,
      does anyone?

      Leon
      --
      Leon Heller, G1HSM leon_heller@...
      http://www.geocities.com/leon_heller
      Low-cost Altera Flex design kit: http://www.leonheller.com
    • Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein
      The newer lathes have a cotter pin rather than a roll pin - the cotter pin being easier to remove. No reason not to make a nice shouldered pin that is a better
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 1, 2002
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        The newer lathes have a cotter pin rather than a roll pin - the cotter pin
        being easier to remove. No reason not to make a nice shouldered pin that is
        a better fit though. Basically it was a cheap way of making a pin, to use
        the cotter pin.
        felice@... is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. See our web pages
        http://www.cartertools.com/nfhome.html

        > When I removed the lever, a bit of the split-pin securing it to the
        > tailstock spindle broke off, so I turned a little shouldered pin out of a
        > short piece of MS to replace it - much neater. I never liked that
        split-pin,
        > does anyone?
      • ajkdfw@aol.com
        I m finally looking at buying a Taig mill. I know there are 3 or 4 types out there, but can someone tell me what they are and explain the differences between
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 3, 2002
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          I'm finally looking at buying a Taig mill. I know there are 3 or 4 types out
          there, but can someone tell me what they are and explain the differences
          between them? Any help is appreciated .. Thanks.

          AJ


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein
          All mills are available in either 9 or 12 travel in x-axis You can buy either the manual mill, the cnc ready mill, or the cnc mill. The manual can now be
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 4, 2002
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            All mills are available in either 9" or 12" travel in x-axis

            You can buy either the manual mill, the cnc ready mill, or the cnc mill.
            The manual can now be upgraded easily to CNC ready or CNC
            The CNC ready can be used manually (with optional handcranks) or converted
            to CNC with your stepper motors and controller
            The CNC comes with motors and controller, and software.

            The CNC mill controller can be ordered in either 3 or 4 axis type, which
            must be done at the time of ordering.
            felice@... is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. See our web pages
            http://www.cartertools.com/nfhome.html

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: <ajkdfw@...>
            To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2002 4:44 PM
            Subject: Re: [taigtools] Some simple lathe additions


            > I'm finally looking at buying a Taig mill. I know there are 3 or 4 types
            out
            > there, but can someone tell me what they are and explain the differences
            > between them? Any help is appreciated .. Thanks.
            >
            > AJ
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@...
            >
            > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-unsubscribe@...
            >
            >
            >
            > Let the chips fly!
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
          • George Goehl
            I need to make some baseball bats out of 1/4 inch diameter naval bronze. These will be about two inches in length. Great precision not necessary for this
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 4, 2002
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              I need to make some baseball bats out of 1/4 inch diameter naval bronze.
              These will be about two inches in length.

              Great precision not necessary for this project.

              What I have been doing is placing a 4 inch piece of rod in the three jaw
              chuck and working from the right end (large part of the bat).

              About 1 and 3/4 inches of the rod are in the chuck.

              The remainder is of course is the part I am turning.

              This seems to be working out fairly well, but I am wondering if there is a
              better way.

              Any suggestions will be appreciated.

              thanks,

              George


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein
              The february/march issue of Machinists Workshop magazine has an article about making nesting bats (small bat in a bigger bat, in a still bigger bat, like the
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 4, 2002
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                The february/march issue of "Machinists Workshop" magazine has an article
                about making nesting bats (small bat in a bigger bat, in a still bigger bat,
                like the russian dolls)
                What you are doing sounds fine.
                felice@... is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. See our web pages
                http://www.cartertools.com/nfhome.html

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "George Goehl" <studio33@...>
                To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Monday, February 04, 2002 11:16 AM
                Subject: [taigtools] New to lathe


                > I need to make some baseball bats out of 1/4 inch diameter naval bronze.
                > These will be about two inches in length.
                >
                > Great precision not necessary for this project.
                >
                > What I have been doing is placing a 4 inch piece of rod in the three jaw
                > chuck and working from the right end (large part of the bat).
                >
                > About 1 and 3/4 inches of the rod are in the chuck.
                >
                > The remainder is of course is the part I am turning.
                >
                > This seems to be working out fairly well, but I am wondering if there is a
                > better way.
                >
                > Any suggestions will be appreciated.
                >
                > thanks,
                >
                > George
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >
                > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@...
                >
                > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-unsubscribe@...
                >
                >
                >
                > Let the chips fly!
                >
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                >
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