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Sewing machine motor,

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  • Edmund
    I was at a garage sale a couple of weeks ago I picked up a working Brothers fairly new sewing machine, with foot control, I have no clue about electric motors
    Message 1 of 56 , Aug 2, 2013
      I was at a garage sale a couple of weeks ago I picked up a working Brothers fairly new sewing machine, with foot control, I have no clue about electric motors but I remember these motors being discussed in the past, are they of any use in driving Taigs machines, reason of asking I would hate to destroy a very nice piece of machinery if its not worth while, I only paid $10.00 for it,

      Any advise would be very helpful and appreciated,

      .........Edmund...........
    • Jeffrey Birt
      There is no need for using a separate uC for any of this, it is all built into Mach3 and the G540. Rule #1: Never overcomplicate your life J The first thing I
      Message 56 of 56 , Dec 12, 2013
        There is no need for using a separate uC for any of this, it is all built into Mach3 and the G540.



        Rule #1: Never overcomplicate your life J



        The first thing I would do is double check the pulley configuration. Remember the numbers you put in the pulley configuration are for SPINDLE speed not motor speed. For example, if the top speed of your motor is 3,500 RPM and you are using the top pulley range on the Taig your spindle speed will be about 10,500 RPM. If we call this pulley 1 then enter minimum speed 0, max 10,500, ratio 1. Now go to the MDI line and type S10000 <enter> to set the spindle speed and then type M3 to turn the spindle on. You can hook a 9V battery up to the VFD output of the STDR-4C for testing and use a voltmeter to see what voltage you get back out.



        If your VFD has a remote start signal you can set up Output 1 (which is the STDR-4C spindle relay) to trigger from Enable 1. This way when mach3 starts up the VFD is powered up. Use the Aux relay on the STDR-4c (Output 2) as the start signal, i.e. set M3 to use output 2. Since you have a SmoothStepper you can also control the acceleration of the PWM signal, go to the spindle tab of Motor Tuning and set the steps/per to 60 and velocity and acceleration to 1000. This will give you a nice ramp up on the PWM. The steps/per of 60 needs to stay at 60 but you can adjust the acceleration setting to get the ramp up speed you desire.



        Jeff Birt

        Soigeneris.com



        From: TAIGTOOLS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TAIGTOOLS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of WAM
        Sent: Thursday, December 12, 2013 7:48 AM
        To: TAIGTOOLS@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [TAIGTOOLS] RE: Sewing machine motor,





        Ryan - I sent this to you too but fig'd I'd post it here:

        Make sure that the CS1000 internal S menu is set to the highest speed.
        There should have been an instruction sheet that came with your CS1000.

        Here's a link to a scan of the CS1000 instruction sheet:
        http://home.comcast.net/~ajawam3/swarf/CS1000instr.pdf

        Another note:
        The typical VFD's require 10V for the VFD's opto isolated opamp in the
        like that found on the G540. The CS1000 uses 5V (middle pin of the 3 pin
        connector) to drive the A2D via the stock photocell. I'm not sure how
        well Gecko's VFD would work with only 5V...

        Right now I don't have Mach control the speed - only the on-off of the
        spindle motor. Since I don't have a tool changer it's no big deal.

        Eventually I may add a small microcontroller (uC) that will control a
        digital pot. As i mentioned, this can be done with a simple Arduino ( I
        think I posted the code for controlling a typical digital pot on Taig
        group - it can be found in the arduino libraries...)

        What will happen is that one GPIO pin of the uC will sense the on-off on
        the PPort Spindle On/Off pin, and another will be used to convert the
        PWM output from Mach 3 on the PWM PPort pin into control of the digital
        pot. That way, I have a bit more control on how the PWM from Mach 3 is
        converted to speed, and I avoid blowing up the CS1000, since I'd be
        using a circuit that more closely resembles the stock photocell (ie. a
        resistance between the two pins).

        It will also allow the uC to start the spindle at 0 ohms which avoids
        the E6 error... As I mentioned on the forum, if you just power on the
        CS1000 to do a run/stop of the spindle you'll get the E6 error. The
        CS1000 requires (for safety in sewing machine applications) that the
        resistance between the pins be at 0 Ohms; ie. - that the black wire be
        at close to 5 volts so that the Power Up is with the motor stopped.

        ryanswansonryan@... wrote:

        >Wam, Im overwhelmingly excited about what you have done with your CS1000 and would like to do the same. I am running a gecko 540 that comes with a vfd port. I unplugged my pot that was being use for a speed control and tied the vfd wires to the input of the speed controller board. My spindle relay turns the whole unit off and on. My hangup is for some reason, Im only generating half motor speed when Im commanding full speed (on controller readout it says 21) and I am out of Mach3 guesses. I don't have an electronics background and am totally puzzled. I looked at your videos and liked that your speed controller had power all the time, then could ramp to full speed without the error E6! What do I need to try to maybe use my current setup with the gecko 540 vfd, am I missing something!! Do I need to use something between my vfd wires and the speed control board?? Thanks for your assistance, you are the only pro ive found with the exact CS1000 that I have!! Ryan
        >





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