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Re: [taigtools] Stuck lathe tail stock cross slide

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  • Paul J. Ste. Marie
    ... Echoing the other comments, squirt in WD-40 to dissolve the crud and clean out the ends with a toothbrush. If there is crud (and swarf, to be more
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 24, 2013
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      On 6/23/2013 7:14 PM, semobill4114 wrote:
      > But first, I wanted to check in and see if anyone else has had a
      > similar problem. I am open to suggestions.

      Echoing the other comments, squirt in WD-40 to dissolve the crud and
      clean out the ends with a toothbrush. If there is crud (and swarf, to
      be more specific) built up at the ends of the joint, you risk forcing it
      into the joint by hammering on it.

      That said, if you've already hammered it an inch, whatever damage there
      was to do is done.
    • Tony Jeffree
      Bill - My advice would be to adjust the tailstock so that it is exactly on-axis and then leave it alone - adjusting tailstocks (generally, not just the Taig)
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 24, 2013
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        Bill -

        My advice would be to adjust the tailstock so that it is exactly on-axis
        and then leave it alone - adjusting tailstocks (generally, not just the
        Taig) is a PIA and best avoided if at all possible - most of the time you
        want it to be absolutely on-axis. If you need to taper-turn then either use
        the topslide or adapt a boring head to serve as an adjustable offset
        tailstock centre.

        I did modify my tailstock so that it has micrometer offset adjustment, but
        apart from using the adjustment to align the tailsock after doing the mods
        mine has remained as I left it.

        Regards,
        Tony


        On 24 June 2013 03:14, semobill4114 <semobill4114@...> wrote:

        > I was trying to take the tail stock apart to clean it. After removing the
        > bolts and hardware, the cross slide would not budge. It is at least ten
        > years old and has never been set over before. After I gave it some
        > cautious whacks with a weighted plastic hammer it moved about an inch but
        > that was all.
        >
        > I suspect that old lube and dirt has glued the parts together. I thought
        > about carefully applying some heat might break the seal. But first, I
        > wanted to check in and see if anyone else has had a similar problem. I am
        > open to suggestions.
        >
        > Bill
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > To Post a message, send it to:
        > taigtools@yahoogroups.com
        >
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        >
        > Let the chips fly!
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • LJG
        Aluminum is a little sticky for want of a better term, and the tailstock on the Taig is bare aluminum. If two blocks of bare aluminum were bolted together
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 24, 2013
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          Aluminum is a little "sticky" for want of a better term, and the tailstock on the Taig is bare aluminum. If two blocks of bare aluminum were bolted together and left for 10 years, they probably would be stuck together. I suspect your problem is just due to the natural properties of aluminum.

          That said, you don't really care, you just want them apart. A solvent may or may not penetrate.

          I would drop it in a container of WD40. (I buy it by the gallon)

          Then I would make a hole in a piece of plywood to allow the "moveable" part to enter and put in in a vise and try to push the part out with a wooden dowel or just a flat piece of plywood. A six inch vise would get it part way out. The aluminum should not contact the vice.

          No vise big enough? I'd figure a way to use a little bottle jack and something heavy!

          And if it comes out I think there is a 50-50 chance it will be useable.

          ljg
        • Don
          I think the term is self welding. Clean aluminum pieces firmly pressed together will weld themselves together. That is how they make the refrigerator coils
          Message 4 of 13 , Jun 24, 2013
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            I think the term is self welding. Clean aluminum pieces firmly pressed together will weld themselves together. That is how they make the refrigerator coils out of two flat sheets of aluminum.

            You might get the parts apart, but there will likely be some tearing of the "weld" If you want a tail stock you can adjust, pick up a new one from Nick and lube the dove tail prior to putting it in service.

            Don

            --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "LJG" <yrralguthrie@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Aluminum is a little "sticky" for want of a better term, and the tailstock on the Taig is bare aluminum. If two blocks of bare aluminum were bolted together and left for 10 years, they probably would be stuck together. I suspect your problem is just due to the natural properties of aluminum.
            >
            > That said, you don't really care, you just want them apart. A solvent may or may not penetrate.
            >
            > I would drop it in a container of WD40. (I buy it by the gallon)
            >
            > Then I would make a hole in a piece of plywood to allow the "moveable" part to enter and put in in a vise and try to push the part out with a wooden dowel or just a flat piece of plywood. A six inch vise would get it part way out. The aluminum should not contact the vice.
            >
            > No vise big enough? I'd figure a way to use a little bottle jack and something heavy!
            >
            > And if it comes out I think there is a 50-50 chance it will be useable.
            >
            > ljg
            >
          • Will Schmit
            Tony, My tailstock is about 1/16 low. I use it (commonly) for pre-drilling parts before I finish them with the boring bar (guided by the CNC table, but it
            Message 5 of 13 , Jun 24, 2013
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              Tony,
              My tailstock is about 1/16" low.
              I use it (commonly) for pre-drilling parts before I finish them with the boring bar (guided by the CNC table, but it really sucks to slide it out to load a part, slide it back, and cram a piece of 16ga brass between the slide and the ways.  Lately, I just give up and just make sure that the flutes of the drill are oriented top/bottom.

              All I can think of (why it is so wrong), is that the headstock is too high.
              Taig must have made it this way for a reason.


              ________________________________
              From: Tony Jeffree <tony@...>
              To: taigtools <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, June 24, 2013 3:38 AM
              Subject: Re: [taigtools] Stuck lathe tail stock cross slide



               
              Bill -

              My advice would be to adjust the tailstock so that it is exactly on-axis
              and then leave it alone - adjusting tailstocks (generally, not just the
              Taig) is a PIA and best avoided if at all possible - most of the time you
              want it to be absolutely on-axis. If you need to taper-turn then either use
              the topslide or adapt a boring head to serve as an adjustable offset
              tailstock centre.

              I did modify my tailstock so that it has micrometer offset adjustment, but
              apart from using the adjustment to align the tailsock after doing the mods
              mine has remained as I left it.

              Regards,
              Tony

              On 24 June 2013 03:14, semobill4114 <semobill4114@...> wrote:

              > I was trying to take the tail stock apart to clean it. After removing the
              > bolts and hardware, the cross slide would not budge. It is at least ten
              > years old and has never been set over before. After I gave it some
              > cautious whacks with a weighted plastic hammer it moved about an inch but
              > that was all.
              >
              > I suspect that old lube and dirt has glued the parts together. I thought
              > about carefully applying some heat might break the seal. But first, I
              > wanted to check in and see if anyone else has had a similar problem. I am
              > open to suggestions.
              >
              > Bill
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > To Post a message, send it to:
              > taigtools@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
              > taigtools-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > Let the chips fly!
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Bill M
              ________________________________ Thanks to everyone who responded.  Good ideas all.  Tony was right ( Don t move it! ) or something like that.  Don and
              Message 6 of 13 , Jun 24, 2013
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                ________________________________
                Thanks to everyone who responded.  Good ideas all.  Tony was right ("Don't move it! " ) or something like that.  Don and Paul's suggestions that I might need a new one are reasonable and logical.  That will probably be the smart thing to do.

                Thanks again.

                Bill 


                I think the term is self welding.  Clean aluminum pieces firmly pressed together will weld themselves together.  That is how they make the refrigerator coils out of two flat sheets of aluminum.  

                You might get the parts apart, but there will likely be some tearing of the "weld"  If you want a tail stock you can adjust, pick up a new one from Nick and lube the dove tail prior to putting it in service. 

                Don

                --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "LJG" <yrralguthrie@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Aluminum is a little "sticky" for want of a better term, and the tailstock on the Taig is bare aluminum.  If two blocks of bare aluminum were bolted together and left for 10 years, they probably would be stuck together. I suspect your problem is just due to the natural properties of aluminum.
                >





                ------------------------------------

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                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • James Eckman
                ... Or given the cost and the ease of changing the tailstock, buy a second one. Jim
                Message 7 of 13 , Jun 25, 2013
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                  > Posted by: "Tony Jeffree"
                  > Bill -
                  >
                  > My advice would be to adjust the tailstock so that it is exactly on-axis
                  > and then leave it alone - adjusting tailstocks (generally, not just the
                  > Taig) is a PIA and best avoided if at all possible - most of the time you
                  > want it to be absolutely on-axis. If you need to taper-turn then either use
                  > the topslide or adapt a boring head to serve as an adjustable offset
                  > tailstock centre.
                  Or given the cost and the ease of changing the tailstock, buy a second one.

                  Jim
                • Tony Jeffree
                  That is an option too :) Regards, Tony ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jun 25, 2013
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                    That is an option too :)

                    Regards,
                    Tony
                    On Jun 25, 2013 3:16 PM, "James Eckman" <ronin_engineer@...> wrote:

                    >
                    > > Posted by: "Tony Jeffree"
                    > > Bill -
                    > >
                    > > My advice would be to adjust the tailstock so that it is exactly on-axis
                    > > and then leave it alone - adjusting tailstocks (generally, not just the
                    > > Taig) is a PIA and best avoided if at all possible - most of the time you
                    > > want it to be absolutely on-axis. If you need to taper-turn then either
                    > use
                    > > the topslide or adapt a boring head to serve as an adjustable offset
                    > > tailstock centre.
                    > Or given the cost and the ease of changing the tailstock, buy a second one.
                    >
                    > Jim
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > To Post a message, send it to:
                    > taigtools@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                    > taigtools-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    > Let the chips fly!
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Lewis Hein
                    ... My Zuiko 300 mm lens just did that to me a few weeks ago. I was out on a camping trip, and I noticed that the tripod collar locking screw was getting
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jun 29, 2013
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                      >I think the term is self welding. Clean aluminum pieces firmly pressed
                      >together will weld themselves together

                      My Zuiko 300 mm lens just did that to me a few weeks ago. I was out on a
                      camping trip, and I noticed that the tripod collar locking screw was getting
                      really stiff to turn. It was an aluminum screw in aluminum. It soon twisted
                      off, but my Taig has since helped fix that. (I'll be discussing this in the
                      next issue of my newsletter)

                      Lewis
                      Pens, plans and projects online at www.heinfamilyenterprises.com/ppp
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "Don" <Don@...>
                      To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Monday, June 24, 2013 4:55 PM
                      Subject: [taigtools] Re: Stuck lathe tail stock cross slide


                      >I think the term is self welding. Clean aluminum pieces firmly pressed
                      >together will weld themselves together. That is how they make the
                      >refrigerator coils out of two flat sheets of aluminum.
                      >
                      > You might get the parts apart, but there will likely be some tearing of
                      > the "weld" If you want a tail stock you can adjust, pick up a new one
                      > from Nick and lube the dove tail prior to putting it in service.
                      >
                      > Don
                      >
                      > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "LJG" <yrralguthrie@...> wrote:
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> Aluminum is a little "sticky" for want of a better term, and the
                      >> tailstock on the Taig is bare aluminum. If two blocks of bare aluminum
                      >> were bolted together and left for 10 years, they probably would be stuck
                      >> together. I suspect your problem is just due to the natural properties of
                      >> aluminum.
                      >>
                      >> That said, you don't really care, you just want them apart. A solvent
                      >> may or may not penetrate.
                      >>
                      >> I would drop it in a container of WD40. (I buy it by the gallon)
                      >>
                      >> Then I would make a hole in a piece of plywood to allow the "moveable"
                      >> part to enter and put in in a vise and try to push the part out with a
                      >> wooden dowel or just a flat piece of plywood. A six inch vise would get
                      >> it part way out. The aluminum should not contact the vice.
                      >>
                      >> No vise big enough? I'd figure a way to use a little bottle jack and
                      >> something heavy!
                      >>
                      >> And if it comes out I think there is a 50-50 chance it will be useable.
                      >>
                      >> ljg
                      >>
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ------------------------------------
                      >
                      > To Post a message, send it to:
                      > taigtools@yahoogroups.com
                      >
                      > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                      > taigtools-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                      >
                      > Let the chips fly!
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • Will Schmit
                      Lew, When dealing with threaded aluminum to aluminum, use silicone grease. I use clarinet cork grease. ________________________________ From: Lewis Hein
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jun 29, 2013
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                        Lew,
                        When dealing with threaded aluminum to aluminum, use silicone grease.
                        I use clarinet cork grease.


                        ________________________________
                        From: Lewis Hein <lhein@...>
                        To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Saturday, June 29, 2013 10:08 AM
                        Subject: Re: [taigtools] Re: Stuck lathe tail stock cross slide



                         
                        >I think the term is self welding. Clean aluminum pieces firmly pressed
                        >together will weld themselves together

                        My Zuiko 300 mm lens just did that to me a few weeks ago. I was out on a
                        camping trip, and I noticed that the tripod collar locking screw was getting
                        really stiff to turn. It was an aluminum screw in aluminum. It soon twisted
                        off, but my Taig has since helped fix that. (I'll be discussing this in the
                        next issue of my newsletter)

                        Lewis
                        Pens, plans and projects online at www.heinfamilyenterprises.com/ppp
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: "Don" <Don@...>
                        To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Monday, June 24, 2013 4:55 PM
                        Subject: [taigtools] Re: Stuck lathe tail stock cross slide

                        >I think the term is self welding. Clean aluminum pieces firmly pressed
                        >together will weld themselves together. That is how they make the
                        >refrigerator coils out of two flat sheets of aluminum.
                        >
                        > You might get the parts apart, but there will likely be some tearing of
                        > the "weld" If you want a tail stock you can adjust, pick up a new one
                        > from Nick and lube the dove tail prior to putting it in service.
                        >
                        > Don
                        >
                        > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "LJG" <yrralguthrie@...> wrote:
                        >>
                        >>
                        >> Aluminum is a little "sticky" for want of a better term, and the
                        >> tailstock on the Taig is bare aluminum. If two blocks of bare aluminum
                        >> were bolted together and left for 10 years, they probably would be stuck
                        >> together. I suspect your problem is just due to the natural properties of
                        >> aluminum.
                        >>
                        >> That said, you don't really care, you just want them apart. A solvent
                        >> may or may not penetrate.
                        >>
                        >> I would drop it in a container of WD40. (I buy it by the gallon)
                        >>
                        >> Then I would make a hole in a piece of plywood to allow the "moveable"
                        >> part to enter and put in in a vise and try to push the part out with a
                        >> wooden dowel or just a flat piece of plywood. A six inch vise would get
                        >> it part way out. The aluminum should not contact the vice.
                        >>
                        >> No vise big enough? I'd figure a way to use a little bottle jack and
                        >> something heavy!
                        >>
                        >> And if it comes out I think there is a 50-50 chance it will be useable.
                        >>
                        >> ljg
                        >>
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ------------------------------------
                        >
                        > To Post a message, send it to:
                        > taigtools@yahoogroups.com
                        >
                        > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                        > taigtools-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                        >
                        > Let the chips fly!
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >




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