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Taig mill low-speed countershaft

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  • rickyaahoo
    I finally made the low-speed countershaft for the mill. Now I get a low speed of 390 RPM with the 1/4 HP OEM motor. My question is, is it possible to use it
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 10, 2013
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      I finally made the low-speed countershaft for the mill. Now I get a low speed of 390 RPM with the 1/4 HP OEM motor. My question is, is it possible to use it for high-speed +30K RPM? I used SAE660 bronze for the bearings, A2 drill rod for the 1/4" shaft, and an OEM pulley. It's tight and doesn't wobble, however I'm concerned the bearings in the Taig mill headstock will disintegrate if I try to run at +30K RPM, or my bronze bearings will overheat due to friction.
    • gebowes
      I d be interested in any pictures or details you could provide about the countershaft. I have been thinking of trying to accomplish the same thing. I would
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 10, 2013
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        I'd be interested in any pictures or details you could provide about the countershaft. I have been thinking of trying to accomplish the same thing. I would like both a lower speed for things such as boring and 25k+ for engraving and PCB's

        30k is too high for the standard spindle bearings. I think the stock bearings are good to about 14k. It is not easy to find the same size bearings rated much over 20k... and if you do, they do not use grease which mean you would have lubrication and shielding issues.

        One day I plan to build or buy a high speed spindle. As I do not need much power, I would probably also use a smaller/lighter motor to drive it.


        --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "rickyaahoo" <yaahoo@...> wrote:
        >
        > I finally made the low-speed countershaft for the mill. Now I get a low speed of 390 RPM with the 1/4 HP OEM motor. My question is, is it possible to use it for high-speed +30K RPM? I used SAE660 bronze for the bearings, A2 drill rod for the 1/4" shaft, and an OEM pulley. It's tight and doesn't wobble, however I'm concerned the bearings in the Taig mill headstock will disintegrate if I try to run at +30K RPM, or my bronze bearings will overheat due to friction.
        >
      • lscesuk
        For some reason my posts to yahoo groups are not going through from emails :( ... What I posted earlier is that the spindle is speced to 15000 RPM and running
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 10, 2013
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          For some reason my posts to yahoo groups are not going through from emails :(

          --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "rickyaahoo" <yaahoo@...> wrote:
          >
          > I finally made the low-speed countershaft for the mill. Now I get a low speed of 390 RPM with the 1/4 HP OEM motor. My question is, is it possible to use it for high-speed +30K RPM? I used SAE660 bronze for the bearings, A2 drill rod for the 1/4" shaft, and an OEM pulley. It's tight and doesn't wobble, however I'm concerned the bearings in the Taig mill headstock will disintegrate if I try to run at +30K RPM, or my bronze bearings will overheat due to friction.
          >

          What I posted earlier is that the spindle is speced to 15000 RPM and running any faster is not recommended. I can get higher speed out of the 3ph variable drive motor, but limit it to 15k.
        • Pierre Coueffin
          I ve seen some very interesting high-speed tooling done using a brushless motor and speed controller intended for an RC aircraft. You can get the off-brand
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 10, 2013
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            I've seen some very interesting high-speed tooling done using a brushless
            motor and speed controller intended for an RC aircraft. You can get the
            off-brand ones cheaply from suppliers on the internet, and they pack a lot
            of torque into a small package.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • rickyaahoo
            This website gave me the idea (scroll down few pages to see the countershaft mod). http://www.micro-machine-shop.com/mill_motor_upgrade.htm However, I did not
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 11, 2013
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              This website gave me the idea (scroll down few pages to see the countershaft mod).
              http://www.micro-machine-shop.com/mill_motor_upgrade.htm

              However, I did not change the riser so my modifications was slightly different than his. I made a 1/4" thick steel motor mounting plate with a 3/4" long slot cut at a 60 degree angle to hold the countershaft support that I mount above the plate with a T-nut that I put on the bottom of the plate; this locks the countershaft support firmly in place. This was the major different in my design.

              My low speeds are: 390, 650, 975, 1435, 2160 for the 1/4 HP OEM motor 3450 RPM. I don't need it to go faster; the idea is to maintain good torque for milling steel; my endmills should last longer now!!

              For materials you would need to purchase 1/4" x 4" steel plate for the motor mount and 1/4" x 1" steel plate for the support bar. Some SAE660 bearing bronze. A 1/4" hardened steel dowel pin is probably best for the shaft. However I used A2 drill rod (not hardened).

              Soon I will uploaded a pictures...



              --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "gebowes" <gebowes@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > I'd be interested in any pictures or details you could provide about the countershaft. I have been thinking of trying to accomplish the same thing. I would like both a lower speed for things such as boring and 25k+ for engraving and PCB's
              >
              > 30k is too high for the standard spindle bearings. I think the stock bearings are good to about 14k. It is not easy to find the same size bearings rated much over 20k... and if you do, they do not use grease which mean you would have lubrication and shielding issues.
              >
              > One day I plan to build or buy a high speed spindle. As I do not need much power, I would probably also use a smaller/lighter motor to drive it.
              >
              >
              > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "rickyaahoo" <yaahoo@> wrote:
              > >
              > > I finally made the low-speed countershaft for the mill. Now I get a low speed of 390 RPM with the 1/4 HP OEM motor. My question is, is it possible to use it for high-speed +30K RPM? I used SAE660 bronze for the bearings, A2 drill rod for the 1/4" shaft, and an OEM pulley. It's tight and doesn't wobble, however I'm concerned the bearings in the Taig mill headstock will disintegrate if I try to run at +30K RPM, or my bronze bearings will overheat due to friction.
              > >
              >
            • rickyaahoo
              Here are pics of my low-speed countershaft. It works great except the belt must be on really tight, otherwise it slips. So when I mill steel, it now produces
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 15, 2013
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                Here are pics of my low-speed countershaft. It works great except the belt must be on really tight, otherwise it slips. So when I mill steel, it now produces real chips, not metal powder.

                Also I did another mounting plate for a 500W DC Motor, purchase from LMS. It's very quiet; ramps up slowly. It doesn't try to go from 0 to 2000 RPMs in under .10 secs flat. Probably good for use in an apartment so that it don't wake the neighbors.


                Low-speed countershaft-BOTTOM
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/taigtools/photos/album/498689051/pic/786837711/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=1&count=20&dir=asc

                Low-speed countershaft-TOP
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/taigtools/photos/album/498689051/pic/1127358228/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=1&count=20&dir=asc

                500W DC Motor
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/taigtools/photos/album/498689051/pic/894194366/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=1&count=20&dir=asc



                --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "rickyaahoo" <yaahoo@...> wrote:
                >
                > This website gave me the idea (scroll down few pages to see the countershaft mod).
                > http://www.micro-machine-shop.com/mill_motor_upgrade.htm
                >
                > However, I did not change the riser so my modifications was slightly different than his. I made a 1/4" thick steel motor mounting plate with a 3/4" long slot cut at a 60 degree angle to hold the countershaft support that I mount above the plate with a T-nut that I put on the bottom of the plate; this locks the countershaft support firmly in place. This was the major different in my design.
                >
                > My low speeds are: 390, 650, 975, 1435, 2160 for the 1/4 HP OEM motor 3450 RPM. I don't need it to go faster; the idea is to maintain good torque for milling steel; my endmills should last longer now!!
                >
                > For materials you would need to purchase 1/4" x 4" steel plate for the motor mount and 1/4" x 1" steel plate for the support bar. Some SAE660 bearing bronze. A 1/4" hardened steel dowel pin is probably best for the shaft. However I used A2 drill rod (not hardened).
                >
                > Soon I will uploaded a pictures...
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "gebowes" <gebowes@> wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > I'd be interested in any pictures or details you could provide about the countershaft. I have been thinking of trying to accomplish the same thing. I would like both a lower speed for things such as boring and 25k+ for engraving and PCB's
                > >
                > > 30k is too high for the standard spindle bearings. I think the stock bearings are good to about 14k. It is not easy to find the same size bearings rated much over 20k... and if you do, they do not use grease which mean you would have lubrication and shielding issues.
                > >
                > > One day I plan to build or buy a high speed spindle. As I do not need much power, I would probably also use a smaller/lighter motor to drive it.
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "rickyaahoo" <yaahoo@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > I finally made the low-speed countershaft for the mill. Now I get a low speed of 390 RPM with the 1/4 HP OEM motor. My question is, is it possible to use it for high-speed +30K RPM? I used SAE660 bronze for the bearings, A2 drill rod for the 1/4" shaft, and an OEM pulley. It's tight and doesn't wobble, however I'm concerned the bearings in the Taig mill headstock will disintegrate if I try to run at +30K RPM, or my bronze bearings will overheat due to friction.
                > > >
                > >
                >
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