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RE: [taigtools] Re: I'm new here. Will I fit in?

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  • Pat Goodyear
    Dan, I have a Clarke 7X12, a Taig, and a Unimat SL. I use the Unimat the most for general small stuff, the Taig for the larger pieces, and the Mini for
    Message 1 of 10 , May 16 8:38 PM
      Dan,

      I have a Clarke 7X12, a Taig, and a Unimat SL. I use the Unimat the most
      for general small stuff, the Taig for the larger pieces, and the Mini for
      threading, mostly cone fittings on Stainless Steel Ultra High Pressure
      tubing. The power feed is handy for that as well as the geared head.

      You will find uses for all you have. I bought a set of collets and chuck for
      the Taig also a vertical mill attachment, I have a 4" rotary indexing head
      that will work on any of the machines with slight modifications, an indexer
      specifically for the Unimat. The Taig and the Mini both have compound
      slides. I have made 3/4-16 to 12M-1 adapters so I can use collets on either
      the Unimat or the Taig, I have both the 3 and 4 jaw chucks for all three
      machines, a steady for the Unimat, and the Mini.
      The Unimat can be configured as a mill or drill press also.

      Pat

      -----Original Message-----
      From: taigtools@yahoogroups.com [mailto:taigtools@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
      Of pgmrdan
      Sent: Thursday, May 16, 2013 2:02 PM
      To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [taigtools] Re: I'm new here. Will I fit in?

      Also, what would be good to add to the beginner's package when/if I get a
      Taig? (I think I'll use that package as a base and add a couple more items,
      if needed, to get started. Good idea?)

      --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "pgmrdan" <pgmrdan@...> wrote:
      >
      > So I bought a mini-lathe and mini-mill several years ago, moved shortly
      after I got them, and still haven't used them much but...I want a Taig
      lathe. I wanted one before I got the mini's.
      >
      > I've learned a bit by experimenting around with the mini's but I really
      like the accuracy of the Taig and, in general, I like small stuff. The
      mini's are small but the Taig is even smaller.
      >
      > Would I be making a dumb move by getting a Taig lathe too? Should I just
      work on improving my mini's? All of the above?
      >
      > Anyway, hello. :)
      >
      > Dan
      >




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    • pgmrdan
      With the mini-lathe s threading ability and with the ability to handle larger items and the accuracy of the Taig with the small stuff I thought the mini-lathe
      Message 2 of 10 , May 17 8:00 AM
        With the mini-lathe's threading ability and with the ability to handle larger items and the accuracy of the Taig with the small stuff I thought the mini-lathe and Taig would complement each other.

        Sounds like that's my reason ('excuse') to get the Taig. :)

        --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, Will Schmit <anchornm@...> wrote:
        >
        > I have never owned a mini.  I work on pretty tiny, and precise stuff.
        > Most lathe or mill owners always want bigger and more powerful tools.  The problem is that most Chinese minis can't hold tolerances.  A Taig lathe is a precise tool.  If you get your skills together, it will be as precise as you will ever need.
        >
        > Two things the Taig doesn't do well:
        > It doesn't thread, and I have to do some major CNC plotting to thread with it.
        > And it doesn't handle larger or longer work.  
        >
        > I have always wanted a mini to "rip" my blanks down to size.
        > There are some guys on the list that do some amazing work -- if someone posts a link -- follow it.
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: pgmrdan <pgmrdan@...>
        > To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Thursday, May 16, 2013 2:16 PM
        > Subject: [taigtools] I'm new here. Will I fit in?
        >
        >
        >
        >  
        > So I bought a mini-lathe and mini-mill several years ago, moved shortly after I got them, and still haven't used them much but...I want a Taig lathe. I wanted one before I got the mini's.
        >
        > I've learned a bit by experimenting around with the mini's but I really like the accuracy of the Taig and, in general, I like small stuff. The mini's are small but the Taig is even smaller.
        >
        > Would I be making a dumb move by getting a Taig lathe too? Should I just work on improving my mini's? All of the above?
        >
        > Anyway, hello. :)
        >
        > Dan
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • LJG
        I ve owned a Taig and I have a mini-lathe. The Taig is precise out of the box, but the lack of a screw drive is a major problem. No thread cutting and no
        Message 3 of 10 , Jun 24, 2013
          I've owned a Taig and I have a mini-lathe.

          The Taig is precise out of the box, but the lack of a screw drive is a major problem. No thread cutting and no mirror finish parts. It's virtually impossible to hand crank slow enough to get a piston like finish. The factory chuck is only ok, but without collets it is far less precise than the rest of the lathe.

          The mini-lathe should be considered a "kit". It needs to be tuned up. It will hold tolerances quite well if some attention is paid to it. The factory chuck is not ok. Either get a good quality Chinese four jaw, or one of the European (likely Poland) 3 jaw chucks. However a 4in Bison 3 jaw chuck will cost about 2/3 the price of the lathe.

          A mini-lathe with a couple of modifications (better chuck and tapered roller bearings in the head is a pretty good lathe. $1000

          The Taig with the addition of the compound slide and the screw drive still won't cut threads, but is otherwise a very good, but very small lathe. $600

          If just the headstock, bed and crossslide are considered on the two, they are just about the same quality. The mini lathe has more parts to go wrong.

          By the way, the chuck on the Taig I had was hard to tighten. It operates more like a drill chuck. No key, just a bar to hold it while it is tightened with the hands.

          ljg
        • Paul J. Ste. Marie
          ... Use two bars, one on the back portion and one on the front. You can usually position it and choose holes such that you can squeeze the bars together.
          Message 4 of 10 , Jun 24, 2013
            On 6/24/2013 4:47 AM, LJG wrote:
            > No key, just a bar to hold it while it is tightened with the hands.

            Use two bars, one on the back portion and one on the front. You can
            usually position it and choose holes such that you can squeeze the bars
            together.

            Still, the four jaw chuck generally functions better, it's just more
            hassle to set up.
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