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RE: [taigtools] Re: Putting lighting on the part

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  • Boman33
    Thanks Shawn, That also looks like a good way to do it. Bertho From: Shawn Woolley Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2013 23:33 I use very simple lights made for
    Message 1 of 24 , Apr 1, 2013
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      Thanks Shawn,

      That also looks like a good way to do it.

      Bertho



      From: Shawn Woolley Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2013 23:33



      I use very simple lights made for musicians and all kinds of console work
      there called little lights there are controlled by a dimmer from a light
      glow to very bright they also have metal bases that can be added to magnets
      or just locked into one of the groves on the headstock. I have one on each
      lathe as shown below and two on my Mills. They work great and are tough and
      very flexible.

      [IMG]http://i139.photobucket.com/albums/q304/retrosurfer1959/TaigLathe.jpg%5b/
      IMG]






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Paul J. Ste. Marie
      ... FWIW, as far as I can tell the unique plug connecting the light is to the power supply is a two-pin DIN connector, e.g.
      Message 2 of 24 , Apr 1, 2013
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        On 3/31/2013 6:51 PM, David Underwood wrote:
        > Bertho, you might like what I did on my mill:
        > http://toolingaround.ca/tml.html

        FWIW, as far as I can tell the "unique plug" connecting the light is to
        the power supply is a two-pin DIN connector, e.g.
        http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/DISTRIBUTED-BY-MCM-13HP035B-/CN00767.
      • David Underwood
        Thanks, Paul. The lights I installed on my mill are an earlier version of the ones currently available, with a different type of connector. I ll update the
        Message 3 of 24 , Apr 1, 2013
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          Thanks, Paul.

          The lights I installed on my mill are an earlier version of the ones
          currently available, with a different type of connector. I'll update
          the site to explain that what I was trying to do is preserve the
          connector that was moulded on to the end of the wire.

          Dave Underwood

          On 01/04/2013 12:28 PM, Paul J. Ste. Marie wrote:
          > On 3/31/2013 6:51 PM, David Underwood wrote:
          >> Bertho, you might like what I did on my mill:
          >> http://toolingaround.ca/tml.html
          > FWIW, as far as I can tell the "unique plug" connecting the light is to
          > the power supply is a two-pin DIN connector, e.g.
          > http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/DISTRIBUTED-BY-MCM-13HP035B-/CN00767.
          >
        • Chris Ghent
          Lighting is so often initiated by buying hardware, here is a post I put here some time ago to help think about the effect you are trying to achieve. ... Based
          Message 4 of 24 , Apr 2, 2013
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            Lighting is so often initiated by buying hardware, here is a post I put
            here some time ago to help think about the effect you are trying to achieve.

            > As one who has spent years lighting for film and tv, here is a quick
            > summary of
            > lighting positions and their uses...
            >
            > A light shining from the side will give you a good idea of the shape of an
            > object.
            > A light shining from behind will show you the separation between objects.
            > A light from the front will flatten shape and remove separation,
            > leaving you to
            > detect distance and shape by colour difference or shade of black and
            > white.
            >
            > This is relevant to machining in that a light placed anywhere near
            > your point of
            > view will make it hard to detect where things are. A good example of
            > this is
            > trying to work through one of those large magnifying lights with a
            > toroidal neon
            > strip. Perspective is completely gone.
            >
            > Any spindle positioning is easier if there is an element of
            > backlighting in the
            > light. A single light will create dark shadows so you really need two
            > lights to
            > get a valuable setup. One from the rear three quarter and one not quite as
            > bright from close to the front is a good setup.
            >
            > It is on my list to get a good lighting setup but as it is I usually
            > use the
            > room light as a front light and I have a small LED torch I hold in a
            > backlighting position during delicate manouvres. When I see a couple
            > of good
            > lights with 240v supply I will buy them.
            >
            > If you want a good understanding of the lighting styles I mentioned at the
            > beginning of this, and a start on the vocabulary of light used by
            > everyone in
            > the film and tv business, find a rooftop position in a city where you
            > have a
            > panoramic view of other buildings in a 180 degree arc from east to
            > west. When
            > the sun is low on the sky you will see the buildings in that quadrant
            > are very
            > easy to distinguish from one another in terms of distance. This is
            > backlight.
            > The buildings in the opposite direction will be a jumble of colour,
            > but you
            > could imagine them being a 2d cutout. This is front light. In between
            > the shapes
            > of the buildings, which will be in side lighting, will be very
            > obvious. You can
            > do this well with trees also.
            >
            > More than I meant to write...

            Based on this understanding the lighting setup I would most like would
            be two lights hung from a ring around the spindle and about 6" out,
            which could be easily slid around the ring to adjust the shadows.

            Best

            Chris
          • Boman33
            Thanks Chris, I remember reading your original article! Very good comments. Bertho From Chris Ghent Sent: Tuesday, April 02, 2013 22:42 Lighting is so often
            Message 5 of 24 , Apr 2, 2013
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              Thanks Chris,

              I remember reading your original article! Very good comments.

              Bertho



              From Chris Ghent Sent: Tuesday, April 02, 2013 22:42



              Lighting is so often initiated by buying hardware, here is a post I put
              here some time ago to help think about the effect you are trying to achieve.

              > As one who has spent years lighting for film and tv, here is a quick
              > summary of
              > lighting positions and their uses...
              >
              > A light shining from the side will give you a good idea of the shape of an
              > object.
              > A light shining from behind will show you the separation between objects.
              > A light from the front will flatten shape and remove separation,
              > leaving you to
              > detect distance and shape by colour difference or shade of black and
              > white.
              >
              > This is relevant to machining in that a light placed anywhere near
              > your point of
              > view will make it hard to detect where things are. A good example of
              > this is
              > trying to work through one of those large magnifying lights with a
              > toroidal neon
              > strip. Perspective is completely gone.
              >
              > Any spindle positioning is easier if there is an element of
              > backlighting in the
              > light. A single light will create dark shadows so you really need two
              > lights to
              > get a valuable setup. One from the rear three quarter and one not quite as
              > bright from close to the front is a good setup.
              >
              > It is on my list to get a good lighting setup but as it is I usually
              > use the
              > room light as a front light and I have a small LED torch I hold in a
              > backlighting position during delicate manouvres. When I see a couple
              > of good
              > lights with 240v supply I will buy them.
              >
              > If you want a good understanding of the lighting styles I mentioned at the
              > beginning of this, and a start on the vocabulary of light used by
              > everyone in
              > the film and tv business, find a rooftop position in a city where you
              > have a
              > panoramic view of other buildings in a 180 degree arc from east to
              > west. When
              > the sun is low on the sky you will see the buildings in that quadrant
              > are very
              > easy to distinguish from one another in terms of distance. This is
              > backlight.
              > The buildings in the opposite direction will be a jumble of colour,
              > but you
              > could imagine them being a 2d cutout. This is front light. In between
              > the shapes
              > of the buildings, which will be in side lighting, will be very
              > obvious. You can
              > do this well with trees also.
              >
              > More than I meant to write...

              Based on this understanding the lighting setup I would most like would
              be two lights hung from a ring around the spindle and about 6" out,
              which could be easily slid around the ring to adjust the shadows.

              Best

              Chris



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • David Underwood
              Excellent advice, Chris. This is why two, adjustable lights are so good. At one time, I was considering putting a set of LED s on the front of my OptiVisor.
              Message 6 of 24 , Apr 3, 2013
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                Excellent advice, Chris. This is why two, adjustable lights are so good.

                At one time, I was considering putting a set of LED's on the front of my
                OptiVisor. I came to my senses when I thought about flat, frontal
                light. While it's OK, it's often better to cast some shadows so you can
                see minor features on a workpiece.

                Dave

                On 02/04/2013 10:42 PM, Chris Ghent wrote:
                > Lighting is so often initiated by buying hardware, here is a post I put
                > here some time ago to help think about the effect you are trying to achieve.
                >
                >> As one who has spent years lighting for film and tv, here is a quick
                >> summary of
                >> lighting positions and their uses...
                >>
                >> A light shining from the side will give you a good idea of the shape of an
                >> object.
                >> A light shining from behind will show you the separation between objects.
                >> A light from the front will flatten shape and remove separation,
                >> leaving you to
                >> detect distance and shape by colour difference or shade of black and
                >> white.
                >>
                >> This is relevant to machining in that a light placed anywhere near
                >> your point of
                >> view will make it hard to detect where things are. A good example of
                >> this is
                >> trying to work through one of those large magnifying lights with a
                >> toroidal neon
                >> strip. Perspective is completely gone.
                >>
                >> Any spindle positioning is easier if there is an element of
                >> backlighting in the
                >> light. A single light will create dark shadows so you really need two
                >> lights to
                >> get a valuable setup. One from the rear three quarter and one not quite as
                >> bright from close to the front is a good setup.
                >>
                >> It is on my list to get a good lighting setup but as it is I usually
                >> use the
                >> room light as a front light and I have a small LED torch I hold in a
                >> backlighting position during delicate manouvres. When I see a couple
                >> of good
                >> lights with 240v supply I will buy them.
                >>
                >> If you want a good understanding of the lighting styles I mentioned at the
                >> beginning of this, and a start on the vocabulary of light used by
                >> everyone in
                >> the film and tv business, find a rooftop position in a city where you
                >> have a
                >> panoramic view of other buildings in a 180 degree arc from east to
                >> west. When
                >> the sun is low on the sky you will see the buildings in that quadrant
                >> are very
                >> easy to distinguish from one another in terms of distance. This is
                >> backlight.
                >> The buildings in the opposite direction will be a jumble of colour,
                >> but you
                >> could imagine them being a 2d cutout. This is front light. In between
                >> the shapes
                >> of the buildings, which will be in side lighting, will be very
                >> obvious. You can
                >> do this well with trees also.
                >>
                >> More than I meant to write...
                > Based on this understanding the lighting setup I would most like would
                > be two lights hung from a ring around the spindle and about 6" out,
                > which could be easily slid around the ring to adjust the shadows.
                >
                > Best
                >
                > Chris
              • Shawn Woolley
                As a artist and painter I deal with light all the time and I find that too much is just as bad as not enough. I chose to put the small Littlelite on my lathe
                Message 7 of 24 , Apr 3, 2013
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                  As a artist and painter I deal with light all the time and I find that too much is just as bad as not enough. I chose to put the small Littlelite on my lathe mounted directly above and just slightly too the front of the work piece for this reason. The head or shield on my light rotates so I can get very fine adjustment and I find I can see my progress best by adjusting the light so that it is predominately top and backlit. in fact I will often run the light so the leading edge of the light square is just at the cutting line. with this accessory light as well as good overall light in the studio I can see both detail and shape even if close up optical glasses are used.

                  --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, Chris Ghent <cghent@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Lighting is so often initiated by buying hardware, here is a post I put
                  > here some time ago to help think about the effect you are trying to achieve.
                  >
                  > > As one who has spent years lighting for film and tv, here is a quick
                  > > summary of
                  > > lighting positions and their uses...
                  > >
                  > > A light shining from the side will give you a good idea of the shape of an
                  > > object.
                  > > A light shining from behind will show you the separation between objects.
                  > > A light from the front will flatten shape and remove separation,
                  > > leaving you to
                  > > detect distance and shape by colour difference or shade of black and
                  > > white.
                  > >
                  > > This is relevant to machining in that a light placed anywhere near
                  > > your point of
                  > > view will make it hard to detect where things are. A good example of
                  > > this is
                  > > trying to work through one of those large magnifying lights with a
                  > > toroidal neon
                  > > strip. Perspective is completely gone.
                  > >
                  > > Any spindle positioning is easier if there is an element of
                  > > backlighting in the
                  > > light. A single light will create dark shadows so you really need two
                  > > lights to
                  > > get a valuable setup. One from the rear three quarter and one not quite as
                  > > bright from close to the front is a good setup.
                  > >
                  > > It is on my list to get a good lighting setup but as it is I usually
                  > > use the
                  > > room light as a front light and I have a small LED torch I hold in a
                  > > backlighting position during delicate manouvres. When I see a couple
                  > > of good
                  > > lights with 240v supply I will buy them.
                  > >
                  > > If you want a good understanding of the lighting styles I mentioned at the
                  > > beginning of this, and a start on the vocabulary of light used by
                  > > everyone in
                  > > the film and tv business, find a rooftop position in a city where you
                  > > have a
                  > > panoramic view of other buildings in a 180 degree arc from east to
                  > > west. When
                  > > the sun is low on the sky you will see the buildings in that quadrant
                  > > are very
                  > > easy to distinguish from one another in terms of distance. This is
                  > > backlight.
                  > > The buildings in the opposite direction will be a jumble of colour,
                  > > but you
                  > > could imagine them being a 2d cutout. This is front light. In between
                  > > the shapes
                  > > of the buildings, which will be in side lighting, will be very
                  > > obvious. You can
                  > > do this well with trees also.
                  > >
                  > > More than I meant to write...
                  >
                  > Based on this understanding the lighting setup I would most like would
                  > be two lights hung from a ring around the spindle and about 6" out,
                  > which could be easily slid around the ring to adjust the shadows.
                  >
                  > Best
                  >
                  > Chris
                  >
                • Jake Horky
                  Do you remember which model Littlelite you have? I hadn t heard of them until now... they have a lot to choose from, and it looks like they are made in the
                  Message 8 of 24 , Apr 3, 2013
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                    Do you remember which model Littlelite you have? I hadn't heard of them
                    until now... they have a lot to choose from, and it looks like they are
                    made in the US.

                    It might be neat to strategically mount a BNC connector somewhere on the
                    mill & lathe in order to use one of their many soundboard lights.


                    On Wed, Apr 3, 2013 at 12:14 PM, Shawn Woolley <shawnwoolley@...> wrote:

                    > **
                    >
                    >
                    > As a artist and painter I deal with light all the time and I find that too
                    > much is just as bad as not enough. I chose to put the small Littlelite on
                    > my lathe mounted directly above and just slightly too the front of the work
                    > piece for this reason. The head or shield on my light rotates so I can get
                    > very fine adjustment and I find I can see my progress best by adjusting the
                    > light so that it is predominately top and backlit. in fact I will often run
                    > the light so the leading edge of the light square is just at the cutting
                    > line. with this accessory light as well as good overall light in the studio
                    > I can see both detail and shape even if close up optical glasses are used.
                    >
                    > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, Chris Ghent <cghent@...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Lighting is so often initiated by buying hardware, here is a post I put
                    > > here some time ago to help think about the effect you are trying to
                    > achieve.
                    > >
                    > > > As one who has spent years lighting for film and tv, here is a quick
                    > > > summary of
                    > > > lighting positions and their uses...
                    > > >
                    > > > A light shining from the side will give you a good idea of the shape
                    > of an
                    > > > object.
                    > > > A light shining from behind will show you the separation between
                    > objects.
                    > > > A light from the front will flatten shape and remove separation,
                    > > > leaving you to
                    > > > detect distance and shape by colour difference or shade of black and
                    > > > white.
                    > > >
                    > > > This is relevant to machining in that a light placed anywhere near
                    > > > your point of
                    > > > view will make it hard to detect where things are. A good example of
                    > > > this is
                    > > > trying to work through one of those large magnifying lights with a
                    > > > toroidal neon
                    > > > strip. Perspective is completely gone.
                    > > >
                    > > > Any spindle positioning is easier if there is an element of
                    > > > backlighting in the
                    > > > light. A single light will create dark shadows so you really need two
                    > > > lights to
                    > > > get a valuable setup. One from the rear three quarter and one not
                    > quite as
                    > > > bright from close to the front is a good setup.
                    > > >
                    > > > It is on my list to get a good lighting setup but as it is I usually
                    > > > use the
                    > > > room light as a front light and I have a small LED torch I hold in a
                    > > > backlighting position during delicate manouvres. When I see a couple
                    > > > of good
                    > > > lights with 240v supply I will buy them.
                    > > >
                    > > > If you want a good understanding of the lighting styles I mentioned at
                    > the
                    > > > beginning of this, and a start on the vocabulary of light used by
                    > > > everyone in
                    > > > the film and tv business, find a rooftop position in a city where you
                    > > > have a
                    > > > panoramic view of other buildings in a 180 degree arc from east to
                    > > > west. When
                    > > > the sun is low on the sky you will see the buildings in that quadrant
                    > > > are very
                    > > > easy to distinguish from one another in terms of distance. This is
                    > > > backlight.
                    > > > The buildings in the opposite direction will be a jumble of colour,
                    > > > but you
                    > > > could imagine them being a 2d cutout. This is front light. In between
                    > > > the shapes
                    > > > of the buildings, which will be in side lighting, will be very
                    > > > obvious. You can
                    > > > do this well with trees also.
                    > > >
                    > > > More than I meant to write...
                    > >
                    > > Based on this understanding the lighting setup I would most like would
                    > > be two lights hung from a ring around the spindle and about 6" out,
                    > > which could be easily slid around the ring to adjust the shadows.
                    > >
                    > > Best
                    > >
                    > > Chris
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Shawn Woolley
                    I actually have several and yep the BNC connected ones are pretty cool I have a 12 inch L-3 fixed neck gooseneck on my lathe and two of the L-4 BNC 12 inch
                    Message 9 of 24 , Apr 3, 2013
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                      I actually have several and yep the BNC connected ones are pretty cool I have a 12 inch L-3 fixed neck gooseneck on my lathe and two of the L-4 BNC 12 inch ones on my mill. I went with the high intensity halogen because of the adjustable heat dispersing head which allows flexible movement for adjusting the light coverage without fighting the gooseneck. I honestly didn't know they had so many models mine were kind of basic models and are a few years old but they work really well and the adjustable neck and dimmer gives you a lot of control.




                      --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, Jake Horky <jacob.horky@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Do you remember which model Littlelite you have? I hadn't heard of them
                      > until now... they have a lot to choose from, and it looks like they are
                      > made in the US.
                      >
                      > It might be neat to strategically mount a BNC connector somewhere on the
                      > mill & lathe in order to use one of their many soundboard lights.
                      >
                      >
                      > On Wed, Apr 3, 2013 at 12:14 PM, Shawn Woolley <shawnwoolley@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > > **
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > As a artist and painter I deal with light all the time and I find that too
                      > > much is just as bad as not enough. I chose to put the small Littlelite on
                      > > my lathe mounted directly above and just slightly too the front of the work
                      > > piece for this reason. The head or shield on my light rotates so I can get
                      > > very fine adjustment and I find I can see my progress best by adjusting the
                      > > light so that it is predominately top and backlit. in fact I will often run
                      > > the light so the leading edge of the light square is just at the cutting
                      > > line. with this accessory light as well as good overall light in the studio
                      > > I can see both detail and shape even if close up optical glasses are used.
                      > >
                      > > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, Chris Ghent <cghent@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > Lighting is so often initiated by buying hardware, here is a post I put
                      > > > here some time ago to help think about the effect you are trying to
                      > > achieve.
                      > > >
                      > > > > As one who has spent years lighting for film and tv, here is a quick
                      > > > > summary of
                      > > > > lighting positions and their uses...
                      > > > >
                      > > > > A light shining from the side will give you a good idea of the shape
                      > > of an
                      > > > > object.
                      > > > > A light shining from behind will show you the separation between
                      > > objects.
                      > > > > A light from the front will flatten shape and remove separation,
                      > > > > leaving you to
                      > > > > detect distance and shape by colour difference or shade of black and
                      > > > > white.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > This is relevant to machining in that a light placed anywhere near
                      > > > > your point of
                      > > > > view will make it hard to detect where things are. A good example of
                      > > > > this is
                      > > > > trying to work through one of those large magnifying lights with a
                      > > > > toroidal neon
                      > > > > strip. Perspective is completely gone.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Any spindle positioning is easier if there is an element of
                      > > > > backlighting in the
                      > > > > light. A single light will create dark shadows so you really need two
                      > > > > lights to
                      > > > > get a valuable setup. One from the rear three quarter and one not
                      > > quite as
                      > > > > bright from close to the front is a good setup.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > It is on my list to get a good lighting setup but as it is I usually
                      > > > > use the
                      > > > > room light as a front light and I have a small LED torch I hold in a
                      > > > > backlighting position during delicate manouvres. When I see a couple
                      > > > > of good
                      > > > > lights with 240v supply I will buy them.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > If you want a good understanding of the lighting styles I mentioned at
                      > > the
                      > > > > beginning of this, and a start on the vocabulary of light used by
                      > > > > everyone in
                      > > > > the film and tv business, find a rooftop position in a city where you
                      > > > > have a
                      > > > > panoramic view of other buildings in a 180 degree arc from east to
                      > > > > west. When
                      > > > > the sun is low on the sky you will see the buildings in that quadrant
                      > > > > are very
                      > > > > easy to distinguish from one another in terms of distance. This is
                      > > > > backlight.
                      > > > > The buildings in the opposite direction will be a jumble of colour,
                      > > > > but you
                      > > > > could imagine them being a 2d cutout. This is front light. In between
                      > > > > the shapes
                      > > > > of the buildings, which will be in side lighting, will be very
                      > > > > obvious. You can
                      > > > > do this well with trees also.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > More than I meant to write...
                      > > >
                      > > > Based on this understanding the lighting setup I would most like would
                      > > > be two lights hung from a ring around the spindle and about 6" out,
                      > > > which could be easily slid around the ring to adjust the shadows.
                      > > >
                      > > > Best
                      > > >
                      > > > Chris
                      > > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
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