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Re: [taigtools] Chuck for drill press

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  • Will Schmit
    Its funny that you mention the wedges. I was drilling a part for our local Mountain Rescue , last weekend. They are a group of private volunteers, virtually
    Message 1 of 22 , Mar 1, 2013
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      Its funny that you mention the wedges.
      I was drilling a part for our local "Mountain Rescue", last weekend.
      They are a group of private volunteers, virtually all of which are nurses or paramedics that I work with in my "straight job".  I opened my tool chest to get a #3 center drill, and she asked "why do you have a climbing piton in your toolbox?".  I explained that it wasn't a climbing spike, it was to remove a drill press chuck.  She kinda glazed-over when I tried to explain how chucks have Jacobs tapers, and drill presses (and other equipment) have Morse tapers......




      ________________________________
      From: Paul J. Ste. Marie <taig@...>
      To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2013 11:55 PM
      Subject: Re: [taigtools] Chuck for drill press


       
      On 2/28/2013 4:43 PM, Will Schmit wrote:
      > I have wanted for years to replace the chuck on my Sears (Craftsman) drill press.

      Enco has 33JT Jacobs chucks for a reasonable price, and replacing the
      50+ year old chuck on my Craftman drill press was a good investment.
      That alone got rid of 75% of the runout.

      Make sure you get the wedges to pop the old chuck off--I suspect my
      brother may have slightly bent the arbor on my drill press taking it off
      by other means when it was his drill press and he put a mortising chisel
      setup on it. I still have about 5 thous of runout I'd like to get rid of.




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Will Schmit
      That FRETS site is fabulous -- thanks! ________________________________ From: WAM To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, February
      Message 2 of 22 , Mar 2, 2013
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        That FRETS site is fabulous -- thanks!




        ________________________________
        From: WAM <ajawam2@...>
        To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2013 6:21 PM
        Subject: Re: Drilling Brass was: Re: [taigtools] Chuck for drill press


         
        Great advice... there's a thing here on drilling brass:
        http://www.chaski.com/homemachinist/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=90388

        I was checking out the photo and the text that went with it. I noticed
        it was Frank Ford from the Frets site.
        Figures. I posted a link to some of his tips and tricks a while back:
        http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/hstpages.html

        Anyway, the old time machinist I 'm lucky enough to work with mentioned
        the same thing when we were drilling acrylic cylinders for a client.

        Stan Stocker wrote:

        >Hi Will,
        >
        >Given your experience it's probably a different mechanism causing the
        >grab, but maybe this is helpful.
        >
        >Being a clock guy brass is a real common material around here. It needs
        >zero rake to cut well without catches or grabs. I have separate sets of
        >drill bits modified just for use on brass. The cutting edges of the
        >drill bit are flattened for a few thou by stoning lengthwise . This
        >leaves a small flat bright line across the face of the drill bit, right
        >at the end of the flute where the cutting occurs. The sort of thing
        >that screams out "Dull bit!" in conventional applications.
        >
        >The flat prevents the bit from grabbing and self feeding. The larger
        >the bit the larger the flat needs to be. If you are using a 3/8 bit to
        >pull 15 thou thick chips the flat has to be greater than 15 thou or you
        >will still dig in.
        >
        >Until I found this out I was forever either stalling the lathe / drill
        >press, breaking bits, or on larger lathes pulling the drill chuck and
        >arbor out of the tailstock ram.
        >
        >Best to all,
        >Stan
        >
        >On 02/28/2013 07:43 PM, Will Schmit wrote:
        >
        >
        >>I have wanted for years to replace the chuck on my Sears (Craftsman) drill press.
        >>There are very few things I hate more than having a bit grab and stop (usually in brass), and having to make the split-second decision to stop the spindle, or retract the quill. Most often, I hold the quill at its current position, and flip-off the motor. Often, the chuck won't hold, and the bit spins. For this reason, I rarely use bits with three flats milled in the shaft. I hate grabbing bits, I hate spinning bits, and I hate one that locks, and doesn't give. A keyed chuck gives some tactile control that isn't available in keyless chucks. Just me -- keyless chucks are for cordless hand drills.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • WAM
        Yea - he s amazing. I have an old time machinist come over occasionally. Typical not impressed with much. The frets site was the only link to anything he ever
        Message 3 of 22 , Mar 2, 2013
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          Yea - he's amazing. I have an old time machinist come over occasionally.
          Typical not impressed with much. The frets site was the only link to
          anything he ever asked about.

          Will Schmit wrote:

          >That FRETS site is fabulous -- thanks!
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >________________________________
          > From: WAM <ajawam2@...>
          >To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
          >Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2013 6:21 PM
          >Subject: Re: Drilling Brass was: Re: [taigtools] Chuck for drill press
          >
          >
          >
          >Great advice... there's a thing here on drilling brass:
          >http://www.chaski.com/homemachinist/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=90388
          >
          >I was checking out the photo and the text that went with it. I noticed
          >it was Frank Ford from the Frets site.
          >Figures. I posted a link to some of his tips and tricks a while back:
          >http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/hstpages.html
          >
          >Anyway, the old time machinist I 'm lucky enough to work with mentioned
          >the same thing when we were drilling acrylic cylinders for a client.
          >
          >Stan Stocker wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          >>Hi Will,
          >>
          >>Given your experience it's probably a different mechanism causing the
          >>grab, but maybe this is helpful.
          >>
          >>Being a clock guy brass is a real common material around here. It needs
          >>zero rake to cut well without catches or grabs. I have separate sets of
          >>drill bits modified just for use on brass. The cutting edges of the
          >>drill bit are flattened for a few thou by stoning lengthwise . This
          >>leaves a small flat bright line across the face of the drill bit, right
          >>at the end of the flute where the cutting occurs. The sort of thing
          >>that screams out "Dull bit!" in conventional applications.
          >>
          >>The flat prevents the bit from grabbing and self feeding. The larger
          >>the bit the larger the flat needs to be. If you are using a 3/8 bit to
          >>pull 15 thou thick chips the flat has to be greater than 15 thou or you
          >>will still dig in.
          >>
          >>Until I found this out I was forever either stalling the lathe / drill
          >>press, breaking bits, or on larger lathes pulling the drill chuck and
          >>arbor out of the tailstock ram.
          >>
          >>Best to all,
          >>Stan
          >>
          >>On 02/28/2013 07:43 PM, Will Schmit wrote:
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>>I have wanted for years to replace the chuck on my Sears (Craftsman) drill press.
          >>>There are very few things I hate more than having a bit grab and stop (usually in brass), and having to make the split-second decision to stop the spindle, or retract the quill. Most often, I hold the quill at its current position, and flip-off the motor. Often, the chuck won't hold, and the bit spins. For this reason, I rarely use bits with three flats milled in the shaft. I hate grabbing bits, I hate spinning bits, and I hate one that locks, and doesn't give. A keyed chuck gives some tactile control that isn't available in keyless chucks. Just me -- keyless chucks are for cordless hand drills.
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
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