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Re: [taigtools] unassembled vs assembled taig lathe.. any difference?

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  • Leon Heller
    ... With the unassembled unit you should lap the carriage to the bed, using a mixture of engine oil and Ajax. It only takes about 10 minutes. It s a bit messy,
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 5, 2001
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      >I have been told that there is a difference between the assembled and
      >the unassembled taig lathes. Something about the bed being ground or
      >lapped or something.
      >can someone please verify this?

      With the unassembled unit you should lap the carriage to the bed, using a
      mixture of engine oil and Ajax. It only takes about 10 minutes. It's a bit
      messy, though. You'll learn more about how the thing is constructed by
      putting it together yourself, and will therefore find it easier to replace
      things if they get damaged.


      Leon
      --
      Leon Heller, G1HSM
      Tel: +44 1327 359058
      Email:leon_heller@...
      My web page: http://www.geocities.com/leon_heller

      _________________________________________________________________
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    • Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein
      The difference is just that, assembly and lapping. There is slight danger that you will tweak the crosslide screw when assembling - take care with that.
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 5, 2001
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        The difference is just that, assembly and lapping. There is slight danger
        that you will tweak the crosslide screw when assembling - take care with
        that.
        felice@... is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. See our web pages
        http://www.cartertools.com/nfhome.html

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Earl" <colin@...>
        To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, August 05, 2001 12:18 AM
        Subject: [taigtools] unassembled vs assembled taig lathe.. any difference?


        > I have been told that there is a difference between the assembled and
        > the unassembled taig lathes. Something about the bed being ground or
        > lapped or something.
        > can someone please verify this? Id like to get the unassembled unit
        > and have some fun putting it together, not to mention saving a litte
        > $$. But if im not going to end up with the same quality as the
        > factory assembled unit, then I dont want to go route. :/
        >
        > please help! is there any truth to this? Is the only difference the
        > labor putting it together, or is there more?
        >
        > thanks-
        >
        >
        >
        > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@...
        >
        > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-unsubscribe@...
        >
        >
        >
        > Let the chips fly!
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
      • Earl
        OK great thanks for the info yall.. however I am still fairly new to this.. what all exactly is involved in lapping the cross slide to the bed? I saw someone
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 5, 2001
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          OK great thanks for the info yall.. however I am still fairly new to
          this.. what all exactly is involved in lapping the cross slide to the
          bed? I saw someone had mentioned using motor oil and ajax. Apply to
          the bed and work the slide across it..(?) like lapping valve seats in
          a head? would regular valve lapping compound work for this as well?
          thanks for the input!


          > The difference is just that, assembly and lapping. There is slight
          danger
          > that you will tweak the crosslide screw when assembling - take care
          with
          > that.
          > felice@c... is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. See our web
          pages
          > http://www.cartertools.com/nfhome.html
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: "Earl" <colin@v...>
          > To: <taigtools@y...>
          > Sent: Sunday, August 05, 2001 12:18 AM
          > Subject: [taigtools] unassembled vs assembled taig lathe.. any
          difference?
          >
          >
          > > I have been told that there is a difference between the assembled
          and
          > > the unassembled taig lathes. Something about the bed being ground
          or
          > > lapped or something.
          > > can someone please verify this? Id like to get the unassembled
          unit
          > > and have some fun putting it together, not to mention saving a
          litte
          > > $$. But if im not going to end up with the same quality as the
          > > factory assembled unit, then I dont want to go route. :/
          > >
          > > please help! is there any truth to this? Is the only difference
          the
          > > labor putting it together, or is there more?
          > >
          > > thanks-
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@e...
          > >
          > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-
          unsubscribe@e...
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Let the chips fly!
          > >
          > >
          > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
          http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          > >
        • Leon Heller
          ... That s basically how it s done. I suppose you could use valve grinding paste, but it might be too coarse. Ajax seems to be just about right. Leon -- Leon
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 6, 2001
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            >
            >OK great thanks for the info yall.. however I am still fairly new to
            >this.. what all exactly is involved in lapping the cross slide to the
            >bed? I saw someone had mentioned using motor oil and ajax. Apply to
            >the bed and work the slide across it..(?) like lapping valve seats in
            >a head? would regular valve lapping compound work for this as well?
            >thanks for the input!
            >

            That's basically how it's done. I suppose you could use valve grinding
            paste, but it might be too coarse. Ajax seems to be just about right.

            Leon
            --
            Leon Heller, G1HSM
            Tel: +44 1327 359058
            Email:leon_heller@...
            My web page: http://www.geocities.com/leon_heller

            _________________________________________________________________
            Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp
          • Tony Jeffree
            ... Valve grinding paste is *way* too coarse, and also will be more difficult to remove from the aluminium components after use. Hard abrasives will tend to
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 6, 2001
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              At 07:44 06/08/2001 +0000, you wrote:
              > >OK great thanks for the info yall.. however I am still fairly new to
              > >this.. what all exactly is involved in lapping the cross slide to the
              > >bed? I saw someone had mentioned using motor oil and ajax. Apply to
              > >the bed and work the slide across it..(?) like lapping valve seats in
              > >a head? would regular valve lapping compound work for this as well?
              > >thanks for the input!
              > >
              >
              >That's basically how it's done. I suppose you could use valve grinding
              >paste, but it might be too coarse. Ajax seems to be just about right.

              Valve grinding paste is *way* too coarse, and also will be more difficult
              to remove from the aluminium components after use. Hard abrasives will
              tend to embed in the surface of soft metals - this is not a good idea and
              will reduce the working life of the machine. Ajax or similar powdered,
              mildly abrasive cleaner is definitely the right stuff to use.

              The instructions that Taig send out suggest about 30-40 strokes to lap the
              slide, so it is a quick process.

              Regards,
              Tony
            • J.C.Beech@shu.ac.uk
              May I also add, that rubbing compound (for auto paint) is not a good choice (I speak from experience 8-( ). Brasso or autosol polish is good, but use it
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 6, 2001
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                May I also add, that rubbing compound (for auto paint) is not a good
                choice (I speak from experience 8-( ). Brasso or autosol polish is
                good, but use it with a few drops of oil. Get a nice finish, then
                flood the lot with carb/brake cleaner to remove every last bit of
                abrasive, and don't forget behind the gib strips, or other crevices.

                Joules



                --- In taigtools@y..., Tony Jeffree <tony@j...> wrote:
                > At 07:44 06/08/2001 +0000, you wrote:
                > > >OK great thanks for the info yall.. however I am still fairly
                new to
                > > >this.. what all exactly is involved in lapping the cross slide
                to the
                > > >bed? I saw someone had mentioned using motor oil and ajax. Apply
                to
                > > >the bed and work the slide across it..(?) like lapping valve
                seats in
                > > >a head? would regular valve lapping compound work for this as
                well?
                > > >thanks for the input!
                > > >
                > >
                > >That's basically how it's done. I suppose you could use valve
                grinding
                > >paste, but it might be too coarse. Ajax seems to be just about
                right.
                >
                > Valve grinding paste is *way* too coarse, and also will be more
                difficult
                > to remove from the aluminium components after use. Hard abrasives
                will
                > tend to embed in the surface of soft metals - this is not a good
                idea and
                > will reduce the working life of the machine. Ajax or similar
                powdered,
                > mildly abrasive cleaner is definitely the right stuff to use.
                >
                > The instructions that Taig send out suggest about 30-40 strokes to
                lap the
                > slide, so it is a quick process.
                >
                > Regards,
                > Tony
              • tadici283@cs.com
                In a message dated 8/5/2001 4:13:23 PM Pacific Daylight Time, colin@viptx.net ... Stay with what works and has been proven to be safe, Ajax and plain good ole
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 6, 2001
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                  In a message dated 8/5/2001 4:13:23 PM Pacific Daylight Time, colin@...
                  writes:


                  >
                  >
                  > OK great thanks for the info yall.. however I am still fairly new to
                  > this.. what all exactly is involved in lapping the cross slide to the
                  > bed? I saw someone had mentioned using motor oil and ajax. Apply to
                  > the bed and work the slide across it..(?) like lapping valve seats in
                  > a head? would regular valve lapping compound work for this as well?
                  > thanks for the input!
                  >

                  Stay with what works and has been proven to be safe, Ajax and plain good ole
                  motor oil, cheap, easy to find, works well and can clean your kitchen sink
                  when your done, I also lapped the crosslide and am very pleased with the
                  results. Good luck not that you will need it.
                  Chris if Bradenton FLA.


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein
                  Never use valve grinding compound, as others have said, it willl embed in the lathe. I use Bon-Ami, which is Feldspar and breaks down quickly...
                  Message 8 of 9 , Aug 6, 2001
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                    Never use valve grinding compound, as others have said, it willl embed in
                    the lathe. I use Bon-Ami, which is Feldspar and breaks down quickly...
                    felice@... is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. See our web pages
                    http://www.cartertools.com/nfhome.html

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "Earl" <colin@...>
                    To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Sunday, August 05, 2001 4:12 PM
                    Subject: [taigtools] Re: unassembled vs assembled taig lathe.. any
                    difference?


                    > would regular valve lapping compound work for this as well?
                    > thanks for the input!
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