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Re: TAIG LATHE HEAD STOCK BEARING PLAY

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  • GordonR
    I assume the problem you are experiencing is spindle chatter when machining difficult to machine materials or operations such as parting off. Ball bearing
    Message 1 of 31 , Nov 4, 2011
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      I assume the problem you are experiencing is spindle chatter when machining difficult to machine materials or operations such as parting off. Ball bearing races, as used in the Taig spindle, are designed for radial loads and they all have lateral play regardless of the quality of the bearing. This is why the latest version of the Taig spindle has a very easy adjustment to remove this lateral play. I have owned two new Taig lathes in the last 3 - 4 years and they both required adjustment. My suggestions are as follows:
      1. Ensure the screw that secures the spindle assembly to the headstock housing is tight. This screw is located on the bottom of the housing.
      2. Set the lathe up for the machining operation that has caused problems in the past. Tighten the adjusting nut, on the spindle, a small amount and repeat the process. Repeat this operation until the machining function can be completed without chatter. Overtightening can cause premature bearing failure.
      I hope this helps.
    • Boman33
      Good comment about that the hex head should be in the thread for support. I have not thought about that. Bertho ================================= From Don
      Message 31 of 31 , Nov 6, 2011
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        Good comment about that the hex head should be in the thread for support. I
        have not thought about that.

        Bertho

        =================================



        From Don Rogers Sent: Sunday, November 06, 2011 13:13
        Bertho, I have to agree 1000%. In my 50+ years as a journeyman machine
        repairman, every occasion of a double set screw was a nightmare. Two will
        not hold better than one, and I have had to go to the extremes of cutting a
        pulley off a shaft only to find that there was a second screw. This is
        after using hydraulic pullers, big hammers, torches, and still not being
        able to pull it off. Usually this all ended in a damaged shaft that
        required replacement.

        A word on Allen head set screws. Make sure the socket is in the threaded
        part, not the clearance part. A typical problem with small set screws it
        that they crack when tightening if the wall of the socket isn't supported by
        the threads.



        Also, when you file the flat on the shaft, make sure the set
        screw is long enough to have a full set of threads in the hole with the
        additional clearance. I've seen short screws used and there were not enough
        threads to hold them and they twisted in the hole. Not to long, not to
        short.
        Don





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