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Re: [taigtools] Re: Boring Head tutorial

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  • Shane Adams
    This is a good suggestion Nick, I think I will go that route.  I like being able to keep the piece clamped and just changing tools. I didn t know about Screw
    Message 1 of 25 , Oct 7, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      This is a good suggestion Nick, I think I will go that route.  I like being able to keep the piece clamped and just changing tools.

      I didn't know about Screw Length drill bits.  I'm having some difficulty finding 3/8" shank or smaller bits when you get to 1/2" diameters.  Any place you guys prefer for this kind of thing?

      Shane

      PS - how do you all lock the gibs?
       
      http://www.fuper.com ~ https://github.com/adamsch1


      ________________________________
      From: Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein <felice@...>
      To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, October 7, 2011 9:07 AM
      Subject: Re: [taigtools] Re: Boring Head tutorial


       
      Assuming you can do each hole one at a time, I would drill the hole on
      the mill, step drill (spot, 1/4" 1/2") using short (screw machine
      length) drill bits. Then use the boring head to remove the remaining
      .125" of material about .01" at a time.
      On a full sized mill I'd finish by reaming but it's difficult on the
      Taig as most reamers a way too long and if the shank can't fit through
      the spindle (over 3/8" shank) then you can't really use one.

      Or you can spot the holes on the mill accurately then move over to the
      drill press and drill then ream each hole to 5/8". Hoever you may want
      to ream the hole .0005/.001 undersize so you get a nice press fit with
      the bushing. This assumes the drill press table is square to the spindle
      and you have a way of accurately locating the spotted hole.

      There are several factors here, the locational accuracy, the roundness
      and the dimensional accuracy. (as well as a few others I won't worry you
      about).

      If you can find a copy of "Precision Hole Location" by Moore it will
      open your eyes to precision holemaking.

      What are the tolerances for your bushing location?

      On 10/6/2011 10:02 PM, Shane Adams wrote:
      > This might be a different question all together -
      >
      > I started down this journey because I need to create a nice round hole for a bushing. The OD of the bushing is 5/8. The ID is 1/2.
      >
      > I'm trying to figure out how to accomplish this. I have a manual mill and a drill press.
      >
      > I figure it would be simple to do it with a CNC Mill.
      >
      > Rotary table?
      >
      > One way I am thinking is to get a drill bit near 5/8 [would have to look it up]. Drill that then bore it out using the boring attachment.
      >
      > Correct?
      >
      > Thanks!
      >
      > Shane
      >
      > http://www.fuper.com ~ https://github.com/adamsch1
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Dean<deanofid@...>
      > To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Wednesday, October 5, 2011 11:53 PM
      > Subject: [taigtools] Re: Boring Head tutorial
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi Shane;
      >
      >>
      >> Sorry to ask a stupid question - the boring head tools is used to widen and make accurate an existing hole yes?
      >>
      >
      > Yes, that's the idea. There are a number of things that might help. Try these, if you haven't already:
      >
      > Make your starting hole as large as practical, and if you can, make it using the same setup as you will use when boring. In other words, drill the starting hole with the mill, then leave the piece in that position and go to boring.
      >
      > If you cannot do the starting hole and boring in one setup, center your hole using a DTI in the spindle.
      >
      > I generally use the lowest spindle speed of 500 rpm.
      >
      > When you have your piece set in position, lock the X and Y gibs. Make sure you have the Z gibs adjusted up right.
      > An oblong hole is from the gibs letting the X or Y or both move.
      >
      > Each time you adjust the boring head for a cut, lock it's gib tight.
      >
      > Use the shortest possible boring bar, and make sure it is SHARP. Resonance will come from boring bar being too long, too high speed on the spindle, sometimes from too slow a feed rate.
      >
      > Put the boring head up into the spindle as far as it will go. Ditto for the boring bar shank up in the boring head.
      >
      > Cutting aluminum often sticks a little chip to the tip of the tool. Check for that and get rid of it if it's happened.
      >
      > A .005" cut on a 1" diameter hole is a pretty fair cut.
      >
      > If your mill is CNC, I would use it in manual mode and run the Z screw by the handwheels.
      >
      > Your clamping/work holding setup must be very sturdy. Nothing hanging out in the breeze. Everything possible supported. Batten down the hatches!
      >
      > The Taig mill will do work above it's weight class, but you need to make sure everything is adjusted up right, and hold your mouth right, too. This picture link is of my mill cutting a 2" radius through 1/2" of 1018 CRS. No problem, just take your time and let the machine work.
      >
      > http://www.deansphotographica.com/machining/engines/duplex/141.jpg
      >
      > Hope something here will help,
      >
      > Dean
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > To Post a message, send it to:
      > taigtools@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
      > taigtools-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > Let the chips fly!
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >

      --
      felice@... is Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein.
      Learn more about us at http://www.nickandfelice.com




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dave Shiels
      I will add an old tool maker trick as well. A regrind 2 flute end mills will rough the hole nicely and be very close to your final size while keeping every
      Message 2 of 25 , Oct 7, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        I will add an old tool maker trick as well. A regrind 2 flute end mills will rough the hole nicely and be very close to your final size while keeping every thing straight and perpendicular. With only a few thousandths left to remove, a reamer will work fine in a good square drill press to size the hole. I kept a set of known sizes stashed when I was in the business.

        If a tight press is needed start at least 0.001 under then move up 0.0005 if to tight.



        On Oct 7, 2011, at 9:07 AM, Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein wrote:

        > Assuming you can do each hole one at a time, I would drill the hole on
        > the mill, step drill (spot, 1/4" 1/2") using short (screw machine
        > length) drill bits. Then use the boring head to remove the remaining
        > .125" of material about .01" at a time.
        > On a full sized mill I'd finish by reaming but it's difficult on the
        > Taig as most reamers a way too long and if the shank can't fit through
        > the spindle (over 3/8" shank) then you can't really use one.
        >
        > Or you can spot the holes on the mill accurately then move over to the
        > drill press and drill then ream each hole to 5/8". Hoever you may want
        > to ream the hole .0005/.001 undersize so you get a nice press fit with
        > the bushing. This assumes the drill press table is square to the spindle
        > and you have a way of accurately locating the spotted hole.
        >
        > There are several factors here, the locational accuracy, the roundness
        > and the dimensional accuracy. (as well as a few others I won't worry you
        > about).
        >
        > If you can find a copy of "Precision Hole Location" by Moore it will
        > open your eyes to precision holemaking.
        >
        > What are the tolerances for your bushing location?
        >
        > On 10/6/2011 10:02 PM, Shane Adams wrote:
        > > This might be a different question all together -
        > >
        > > I started down this journey because I need to create a nice round hole for a bushing. The OD of the bushing is 5/8. The ID is 1/2.
        > >
        > > I'm trying to figure out how to accomplish this. I have a manual mill and a drill press.
        > >
        > > I figure it would be simple to do it with a CNC Mill.
        > >
        > > Rotary table?
        > >
        > > One way I am thinking is to get a drill bit near 5/8 [would have to look it up]. Drill that then bore it out using the boring attachment.
        > >
        > > Correct?
        > >
        > > Thanks!
        > >
        > > Shane
        > >
        > > http://www.fuper.com ~ https://github.com/adamsch1
        > >
        > >
        > > ________________________________
        > > From: Dean<deanofid@...>
        > > To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
        > > Sent: Wednesday, October 5, 2011 11:53 PM
        > > Subject: [taigtools] Re: Boring Head tutorial
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Hi Shane;
        > >
        > >>
        > >> Sorry to ask a stupid question - the boring head tools is used to widen and make accurate an existing hole yes?
        > >>
        > >
        > > Yes, that's the idea. There are a number of things that might help. Try these, if you haven't already:
        > >
        > > Make your starting hole as large as practical, and if you can, make it using the same setup as you will use when boring. In other words, drill the starting hole with the mill, then leave the piece in that position and go to boring.
        > >
        > > If you cannot do the starting hole and boring in one setup, center your hole using a DTI in the spindle.
        > >
        > > I generally use the lowest spindle speed of 500 rpm.
        > >
        > > When you have your piece set in position, lock the X and Y gibs. Make sure you have the Z gibs adjusted up right.
        > > An oblong hole is from the gibs letting the X or Y or both move.
        > >
        > > Each time you adjust the boring head for a cut, lock it's gib tight.
        > >
        > > Use the shortest possible boring bar, and make sure it is SHARP. Resonance will come from boring bar being too long, too high speed on the spindle, sometimes from too slow a feed rate.
        > >
        > > Put the boring head up into the spindle as far as it will go. Ditto for the boring bar shank up in the boring head.
        > >
        > > Cutting aluminum often sticks a little chip to the tip of the tool. Check for that and get rid of it if it's happened.
        > >
        > > A .005" cut on a 1" diameter hole is a pretty fair cut.
        > >
        > > If your mill is CNC, I would use it in manual mode and run the Z screw by the handwheels.
        > >
        > > Your clamping/work holding setup must be very sturdy. Nothing hanging out in the breeze. Everything possible supported. Batten down the hatches!
        > >
        > > The Taig mill will do work above it's weight class, but you need to make sure everything is adjusted up right, and hold your mouth right, too. This picture link is of my mill cutting a 2" radius through 1/2" of 1018 CRS. No problem, just take your time and let the machine work.
        > >
        > > http://www.deansphotographica.com/machining/engines/duplex/141.jpg
        > >
        > > Hope something here will help,
        > >
        > > Dean
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > To Post a message, send it to:
        > > taigtools@yahoogroups.com
        > >
        > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
        > > taigtools-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > >
        > > Let the chips fly!
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        > --
        > felice@... is Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein.
        > Learn more about us at http://www.nickandfelice.com
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Shane Adams
        Thanks Dave - What size of end mill would you start with here? Shane   http://www.fuper.com ~ https://github.com/adamsch1 ________________________________
        Message 3 of 25 , Oct 7, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks Dave -

          What size of end mill would you start with here?

          Shane
           
          http://www.fuper.com ~ https://github.com/adamsch1


          ________________________________
          From: Dave Shiels <dshiels@...>
          To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, October 7, 2011 11:02 AM
          Subject: Re: [taigtools] Re: Boring Head tutorial

          I will add an old tool maker trick as well.  A regrind 2 flute end mills will rough the hole nicely and be very close to your final size while keeping every thing straight and perpendicular.  With only a few thousandths left to remove, a reamer will work fine in a good square drill press to size the hole.  I kept a set of known sizes stashed when I was in the business.

          If a tight press is needed start at least 0.001 under then move up 0.0005 if to tight.



          On Oct 7, 2011, at 9:07 AM, Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein wrote:

          > Assuming you can do each hole one at a time, I would drill the hole on
          > the mill, step drill (spot, 1/4" 1/2") using short (screw machine
          > length) drill bits. Then use the boring head to remove the remaining
          > .125" of material about .01" at a time.
          > On a full sized mill I'd finish by reaming but it's difficult on the
          > Taig as most reamers a way too long and if the shank can't fit through
          > the spindle (over 3/8" shank) then you can't really use one.
          >
          > Or you can spot the holes on the mill accurately then move over to the
          > drill press and drill then ream each hole to 5/8". Hoever you may want
          > to ream the hole .0005/.001 undersize so you get a nice press fit with
          > the bushing. This assumes the drill press table is square to the spindle
          > and you have a way of accurately locating the spotted hole.
          >
          > There are several factors here, the locational accuracy, the roundness
          > and the dimensional accuracy. (as well as a few others I won't worry you
          > about).
          >
          > If you can find a copy of "Precision Hole Location" by Moore it will
          > open your eyes to precision holemaking.
          >
          > What are the tolerances for your bushing location?
          >
          > On 10/6/2011 10:02 PM, Shane Adams wrote:
          > > This might be a different question all together -
          > >
          > > I started down this journey because I need to create a nice round hole for a bushing. The OD of the bushing is 5/8. The ID is 1/2.
          > >
          > > I'm trying to figure out how to accomplish this. I have a manual mill and a drill press.
          > >
          > > I figure it would be simple to do it with a CNC Mill.
          > >
          > > Rotary table?
          > >
          > > One way I am thinking is to get a drill bit near 5/8 [would have to look it up]. Drill that then bore it out using the boring attachment.
          > >
          > > Correct?
          > >
          > > Thanks!
          > >
          > > Shane
          > >
          > > http://www.fuper.com ~ https://github.com/adamsch1
          > >
          > >
          > > ________________________________
          > > From: Dean<deanofid@...>
          > > To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
          > > Sent: Wednesday, October 5, 2011 11:53 PM
          > > Subject: [taigtools] Re: Boring Head tutorial
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Hi Shane;
          > >
          > >>
          > >> Sorry to ask a stupid question - the boring head tools is used to widen and make accurate an existing hole yes?
          > >>
          > >
          > > Yes, that's the idea. There are a number of things that might help. Try these, if you haven't already:
          > >
          > > Make your starting hole as large as practical, and if you can, make it using the same setup as you will use when boring. In other words, drill the starting hole with the mill, then leave the piece in that position and go to boring.
          > >
          > > If you cannot do the starting hole and boring in one setup, center your hole using a DTI in the spindle.
          > >
          > > I generally use the lowest spindle speed of 500 rpm.
          > >
          > > When you have your piece set in position, lock the X and Y gibs. Make sure you have the Z gibs adjusted up right.
          > > An oblong hole is from the gibs letting the X or Y or both move.
          > >
          > > Each time you adjust the boring head for a cut, lock it's gib tight.
          > >
          > > Use the shortest possible boring bar, and make sure it is SHARP. Resonance will come from boring bar being too long, too high speed on the spindle, sometimes from too slow a feed rate.
          > >
          > > Put the boring head up into the spindle as far as it will go. Ditto for the boring bar shank up in the boring head.
          > >
          > > Cutting aluminum often sticks a little chip to the tip of the tool. Check for that and get rid of it if it's happened.
          > >
          > > A .005" cut on a 1" diameter hole is a pretty fair cut.
          > >
          > > If your mill is CNC, I would use it in manual mode and run the Z screw by the handwheels.
          > >
          > > Your clamping/work holding setup must be very sturdy. Nothing hanging out in the breeze. Everything possible supported. Batten down the hatches!
          > >
          > > The Taig mill will do work above it's weight class, but you need to make sure everything is adjusted up right, and hold your mouth right, too. This picture link is of my mill cutting a 2" radius through 1/2" of 1018 CRS. No problem, just take your time and let the machine work.
          > >
          > > http://www.deansphotographica.com/machining/engines/duplex/141.jpg
          > >
          > > Hope something here will help,
          > >
          > > Dean
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > ------------------------------------
          > >
          > > To Post a message, send it to:
          > > taigtools@yahoogroups.com
          > >
          > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
          > > taigtools-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > >
          > > Let the chips fly!
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          > --
          > felice@... is Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein.
          > Learn more about us at http://www.nickandfelice.com
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          ------------------------------------

          To Post a message, send it to: 
          taigtools@yahoogroups.com

          To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
          taigtools-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Let the chips fly!
          Yahoo! Groups Links



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Dave Shiels
          Something 0.010 under should be fine if the spindle runout is low. In a full heavy mill with nice spindle I went 0.005. The reamer only has to do sizing work
          Message 4 of 25 , Oct 7, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Something 0.010 under should be fine if the spindle runout is low.
            In a full heavy mill with nice spindle I went 0.005.

            The reamer only has to do sizing work which is what it is intended to do anyway.

            On Oct 7, 2011, at 11:04 AM, Shane Adams wrote:

            > Thanks Dave -
            >
            > What size of end mill would you start with here?
            >
            > Shane
            >
            > http://www.fuper.com ~ https://github.com/adamsch1
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: Dave Shiels <dshiels@...>
            > To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Friday, October 7, 2011 11:02 AM
            > Subject: Re: [taigtools] Re: Boring Head tutorial
            >
            > I will add an old tool maker trick as well. A regrind 2 flute end mills will rough the hole nicely and be very close to your final size while keeping every thing straight and perpendicular. With only a few thousandths left to remove, a reamer will work fine in a good square drill press to size the hole. I kept a set of known sizes stashed when I was in the business.
            >
            > If a tight press is needed start at least 0.001 under then move up 0.0005 if to tight.
            >
            > On Oct 7, 2011, at 9:07 AM, Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein wrote:
            >
            > > Assuming you can do each hole one at a time, I would drill the hole on
            > > the mill, step drill (spot, 1/4" 1/2") using short (screw machine
            > > length) drill bits. Then use the boring head to remove the remaining
            > > .125" of material about .01" at a time.
            > > On a full sized mill I'd finish by reaming but it's difficult on the
            > > Taig as most reamers a way too long and if the shank can't fit through
            > > the spindle (over 3/8" shank) then you can't really use one.
            > >
            > > Or you can spot the holes on the mill accurately then move over to the
            > > drill press and drill then ream each hole to 5/8". Hoever you may want
            > > to ream the hole .0005/.001 undersize so you get a nice press fit with
            > > the bushing. This assumes the drill press table is square to the spindle
            > > and you have a way of accurately locating the spotted hole.
            > >
            > > There are several factors here, the locational accuracy, the roundness
            > > and the dimensional accuracy. (as well as a few others I won't worry you
            > > about).
            > >
            > > If you can find a copy of "Precision Hole Location" by Moore it will
            > > open your eyes to precision holemaking.
            > >
            > > What are the tolerances for your bushing location?
            > >
            > > On 10/6/2011 10:02 PM, Shane Adams wrote:
            > > > This might be a different question all together -
            > > >
            > > > I started down this journey because I need to create a nice round hole for a bushing. The OD of the bushing is 5/8. The ID is 1/2.
            > > >
            > > > I'm trying to figure out how to accomplish this. I have a manual mill and a drill press.
            > > >
            > > > I figure it would be simple to do it with a CNC Mill.
            > > >
            > > > Rotary table?
            > > >
            > > > One way I am thinking is to get a drill bit near 5/8 [would have to look it up]. Drill that then bore it out using the boring attachment.
            > > >
            > > > Correct?
            > > >
            > > > Thanks!
            > > >
            > > > Shane
            > > >
            > > > http://www.fuper.com ~ https://github.com/adamsch1
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > ________________________________
            > > > From: Dean<deanofid@...>
            > > > To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
            > > > Sent: Wednesday, October 5, 2011 11:53 PM
            > > > Subject: [taigtools] Re: Boring Head tutorial
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Hi Shane;
            > > >
            > > >>
            > > >> Sorry to ask a stupid question - the boring head tools is used to widen and make accurate an existing hole yes?
            > > >>
            > > >
            > > > Yes, that's the idea. There are a number of things that might help. Try these, if you haven't already:
            > > >
            > > > Make your starting hole as large as practical, and if you can, make it using the same setup as you will use when boring. In other words, drill the starting hole with the mill, then leave the piece in that position and go to boring.
            > > >
            > > > If you cannot do the starting hole and boring in one setup, center your hole using a DTI in the spindle.
            > > >
            > > > I generally use the lowest spindle speed of 500 rpm.
            > > >
            > > > When you have your piece set in position, lock the X and Y gibs. Make sure you have the Z gibs adjusted up right.
            > > > An oblong hole is from the gibs letting the X or Y or both move.
            > > >
            > > > Each time you adjust the boring head for a cut, lock it's gib tight.
            > > >
            > > > Use the shortest possible boring bar, and make sure it is SHARP. Resonance will come from boring bar being too long, too high speed on the spindle, sometimes from too slow a feed rate.
            > > >
            > > > Put the boring head up into the spindle as far as it will go. Ditto for the boring bar shank up in the boring head.
            > > >
            > > > Cutting aluminum often sticks a little chip to the tip of the tool. Check for that and get rid of it if it's happened.
            > > >
            > > > A .005" cut on a 1" diameter hole is a pretty fair cut.
            > > >
            > > > If your mill is CNC, I would use it in manual mode and run the Z screw by the handwheels.
            > > >
            > > > Your clamping/work holding setup must be very sturdy. Nothing hanging out in the breeze. Everything possible supported. Batten down the hatches!
            > > >
            > > > The Taig mill will do work above it's weight class, but you need to make sure everything is adjusted up right, and hold your mouth right, too. This picture link is of my mill cutting a 2" radius through 1/2" of 1018 CRS. No problem, just take your time and let the machine work.
            > > >
            > > > http://www.deansphotographica.com/machining/engines/duplex/141.jpg
            > > >
            > > > Hope something here will help,
            > > >
            > > > Dean
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > ------------------------------------
            > > >
            > > > To Post a message, send it to:
            > > > taigtools@yahoogroups.com
            > > >
            > > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
            > > > taigtools-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > > >
            > > > Let the chips fly!
            > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > > --
            > > felice@... is Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein.
            > > Learn more about us at http://www.nickandfelice.com
            > >
            > >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > To Post a message, send it to:
            > taigtools@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
            > taigtools-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > Let the chips fly!
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Lewis Hein
            When I got my boring head, It never really worked properly until I sharpened the bars that came with it. Any diamond whetstone should do this just fine. Lewis
            Message 5 of 25 , Oct 7, 2011
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              When I got my boring head, It never really worked properly until I sharpened
              the bars that came with it. Any diamond whetstone should do this just fine.

              Lewis Hein
              Pens, plans and projects online at www.heinfamilyenterprises.com/ppp
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Shane Adams" <adamsch1@...>
              To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Wednesday, October 05, 2011 11:20 PM
              Subject: Re: [taigtools] Boring Head tutorial


              Thanks Nick!

              This is what I was doing:

              I had a hole drilled in scrap aluminum.

              I tried to widen the hole using the boring head.

              How do I not end up creating an oblong hole? I had much trouble centering it
              so I gave up.

              Sorry to ask a stupid question - the boring head tools is used to widen and
              make accurate an existing hole yes?

              Shane


              http://www.fuper.com ~ https://github.com/adamsch1


              ________________________________
              From: Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein <felice@...>
              To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Wednesday, October 5, 2011 9:58 PM
              Subject: Re: [taigtools] Boring Head tutorial



              Well it's tough! The lowest spindle speed on the Taig is really right at
              the edge of acceptable for boring - you have to take light cuts with a
              relatively low feedrate but also take into account resonance, so
              sometimes that means taking a heavier cut/faster feedrate. It's
              essentially experimental for you to find what works best for a given hole.

              On 10/5/2011 9:04 PM, Shane Adams wrote:
              > Damn near broke my mill trying out my new Boring head 2035ER.
              >
              > Anyone have any overall big picture on how to use this thing?
              >
              > Shane
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > To Post a message, send it to:
              > taigtools@yahoogroups.com
              >
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              > Let the chips fly!
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >

              --
              felice@... is Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein.
              Learn more about us at http://www.nickandfelice.com




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



              ------------------------------------

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              Let the chips fly!
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            • Dean
              ... Shane, on the front of the X table you will see a socket head cap screw right in the middle of that table. Tighten it to lock the X table. Under the left
              Message 6 of 25 , Oct 7, 2011
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                --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, Shane Adams <adamsch1@...> wrote:

                >
                > PS - how do you all lock the gibs?
                >
                >

                Shane, on the front of the X table you will see a socket head cap screw right in the middle of that table. Tighten it to lock the X table.

                Under the left side of the Y carriage, on the bottom, is a similar screw. Tighten that to lock the Y movement.

                The lock for the Z travel is on the right side of the mill headstock saddle.

                Dean
              • Lee
                I also had a bad experience with the Taig boring tool. I just figured it was my own ignorance that pretty much destroyed this tool. After using a 2 boring
                Message 7 of 25 , Oct 10, 2011
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                  I also had a bad experience with the Taig boring tool. I just figured it was my own ignorance that pretty much destroyed this tool. After using a 2" boring tool on my X3 lathe with much success, I was pretty much humbled with this experience!!

                  So I'll be reading the posts in regards to this tool with great interest til I can afford to purchase another tool.

                  Thanks,

                  Lee
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