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Extending the drilling capacity of taig tailstock

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  • ChrisH
    Is there a practical way to extend the drilling capacity beyond the 1 the lever arm currently allows for? Chris
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 5, 2011
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      Is there a practical way to extend the drilling capacity beyond the 1" the lever arm currently allows for?

      Chris
    • Shane Adams
      Hey all - I need to make a precise 1/4 hole. I was going to drill it by using a 15/64 bit then using a 1/4 chucking reamer to finish it. The reamer would
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 5, 2011
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        Hey all -

        I need to make a precise 1/4" hole.

        I was going to drill it by using a 15/64" bit then using a 1/4 chucking reamer to finish it.

        The reamer would need to remove only 0.015625 of material.  

        Would this be correct?

        I've got a copy of Machinery's Handbook but I'm finding it difficult to understand 
        how much material or what size of hole a chucking reamer should be applied to for the final cutting?

        Shane

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Andy Trivette
        That would be correct when making jigs and fixtures we drill one size below the reamer size. Andy ... From: Shane Adams To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com Sent:
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 5, 2011
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          That would be correct when making jigs and fixtures we drill one size below the reamer size.
          Andy
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Shane Adams
          To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, September 05, 2011 9:20 PM
          Subject: [taigtools] 1/4 finishing



          Hey all -

          I need to make a precise 1/4" hole.

          I was going to drill it by using a 15/64" bit then using a 1/4 chucking reamer to finish it.

          The reamer would need to remove only 0.015625 of material.

          Would this be correct?

          I've got a copy of Machinery's Handbook but I'm finding it difficult to understand
          how much material or what size of hole a chucking reamer should be applied to for the final cutting?

          Shane

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Shane Adams
          Thanks Andy! Shane   http://www.fuper.com ~ https://github.com/adamsch1 ________________________________ From: Andy Trivette To:
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 5, 2011
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            Thanks Andy!

            Shane
             
            http://www.fuper.com ~ https://github.com/adamsch1


            ________________________________
            From: Andy Trivette <trivette@...>
            To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, September 5, 2011 6:23 PM
            Subject: Re: [taigtools] 1/4 finishing


             
            That would be correct when making jigs and fixtures we drill one size below the reamer size.
            Andy
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Shane Adams
            To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, September 05, 2011 9:20 PM
            Subject: [taigtools] 1/4 finishing

            Hey all -

            I need to make a precise 1/4" hole.

            I was going to drill it by using a 15/64" bit then using a 1/4 chucking reamer to finish it.

            The reamer would need to remove only 0.015625 of material.

            Would this be correct?

            I've got a copy of Machinery's Handbook but I'm finding it difficult to understand
            how much material or what size of hole a chucking reamer should be applied to for the final cutting?

            Shane

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Mars Bonfire
            I am curious about the answer also. Someone long ago told me the practical max undersize was about 0.005 diameter for the drill hole that would be
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 6, 2011
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              I am curious about the answer also. Someone long ago told me the practical max undersize was about 0.005" diameter for the drill hole that would be subsequently reamed. That being said, I sometimes have a heck of a time making a very circular hole (not egg shaped or three sized) such that it leaves enough material all the way around the hole such that there is something to ream out. I guess it depends on having carefully sharpened drill bits and pilot holes and lubricant. Any comments from the experts on making high quality, circular drill holes, much appreciated.

              Steve


              --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, Shane Adams <adamsch1@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thanks Andy!
              >
              > Shane
              >  
              > http://www.fuper.com ~ https://github.com/adamsch1
              >
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: Andy Trivette <trivette@...>
              > To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Monday, September 5, 2011 6:23 PM
              > Subject: Re: [taigtools] 1/4 finishing
              >
              >
              >  
              > That would be correct when making jigs and fixtures we drill one size below the reamer size.
              > Andy
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Shane Adams
              > To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Monday, September 05, 2011 9:20 PM
              > Subject: [taigtools] 1/4 finishing
              >
              > Hey all -
              >
              > I need to make a precise 1/4" hole.
              >
              > I was going to drill it by using a 15/64" bit then using a 1/4 chucking reamer to finish it.
              >
              > The reamer would need to remove only 0.015625 of material.
              >
              > Would this be correct?
              >
              > I've got a copy of Machinery's Handbook but I'm finding it difficult to understand
              > how much material or what size of hole a chucking reamer should be applied to for the final cutting?
              >
              > Shane
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Steve Blackmore
              ... Lots of thing cause triangular holes. Other than what you have already mentioned, feeding too hard/wrong relief angle, poor spindle rigidity, crap chuck or
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 6, 2011
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                On Tue, 06 Sep 2011 16:12:28 -0000, you wrote:

                >I am curious about the answer also. Someone long ago told me the practical max undersize was about 0.005" diameter for the drill hole that would be subsequently reamed. That being said, I sometimes have a heck of a time making a very circular hole (not egg shaped or three sized) such that it leaves enough material all the way around the hole such that there is something to ream out. I guess it depends on having carefully sharpened drill bits and pilot holes and lubricant. Any comments from the experts on making high quality, circular drill holes, much appreciated.

                Lots of thing cause triangular holes. Other than what you have already
                mentioned, feeding too hard/wrong relief angle, poor spindle rigidity,
                crap chuck or crap drills :) Always clamp work properly, hand holding
                apart from being dangerous, produces crap holes.

                Use stub drills wherever possible.

                For thin material use 135 degree drills, preferably split point.

                Three flute drills generally produce tri lobed holes, two flute drills,
                oval holes :)

                Always drill a pilot hole first where practical. If the "point" of the
                drill is not cutting the drill will track better and produce a rounder
                hole. BUT - No matter how hard you try you will never drill a perfectly
                circular hole with a standard drill bit.

                Steve Blackmore
                --
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