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Re: Taig vs. sherline

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  • timothysvec
    Someone once said, It s not the weapon but the man that s behind it. I think they are both great machines. Practice, knowledge and an open mind will make
    Message 1 of 21 , Dec 31, 2009
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      Someone once said, It's not the weapon but the man that's behind it. I think they are both great machines. Practice, knowledge and an open mind will make either choice a rewarding experience. I have a taig and just put the powerfeed on board. Works great with my treadmill motor. Slow and steady. I can't believe I went with out for 5 years.

      --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, James Eckman <ronin_engineer@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > > Posted by: j l kieffer
      > >
      > > I suspect in most cases you will be far better off if you just own both machines and use the one best suited for the work you are doing at the time.
      > >
      > > Jerry Kieffer
      > >
      > Both lathes have strengths and weaknesses. If you can afford both,
      > that's the best way to go. Failing that, know the sort of work you are
      > going to do and pick the one most suited. I've been tempted by the
      > Sherline for the threading, I feel using the handcrank for these fine
      > threads is a superior approach. I have made a crank for my Taig for
      > tapping and the use of dies. It doesn't work well with my threading
      > setup. One the other hand, the flat bed of the Taig makes certain
      > freehand turnings easy with what I call a puck. Also useful for some
      > layout tasks.
      >
      > Jim
      >
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