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Re: Idle Current Reduction

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  • noisillator
    ... Ken, which driver are you using? What is your power supply voltage?
    Message 1 of 34 , Aug 7, 2009
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      --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, Ken Cline <cline@...> wrote:

      > For what its worth, I started out with some <200 oz-in motors and
      > found them lacking. Now I'm running 250-280 oz-in, and am much
      > happier with the results.

      Ken, which driver are you using? What is your power supply voltage?
    • noisillator
      ... The slow start circuit (Gecko misc circuits) is to protect my PS components. The transformer is huge, originally used in a 13.8V 60A supply, so inrush
      Message 34 of 34 , Aug 18, 2009
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        --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, Ken Cline <cline@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > I hope this doesn't sound mean, but it sounds as though you are
        > solving nonexistent problems again. The Gecko drive does not need a
        > soft start.

        The slow start circuit (Gecko misc circuits) is to protect my PS components. The transformer is huge, originally used in a 13.8V 60A supply, so inrush current is substantial. There's a loud thump when it's first turned on, and it blew the 12A Slo-Blo fuse in my variac yesterday.

        > Also, it drains my supply (with 64,000 uF of capacitance)
        > in about 20 seconds, and has an LED that will go out when it is safe
        > to swap motors. Maybe add an LED & resistor to your power supply if
        > you want an independent indication of PS voltage.

        I want an E-Stop system that's fail-safe and will stop everything immediately (or as close to immediately as is practical). The Gecko-suggested circuit (Gecko app notes) will drain the supply to about 10% of its value in less than 1/2 second. I'll also use the circuit to trigger a relay that shuts off AC to the spindle motor, as well as shutting down the software.

        > Consider adjusting everything on your mill (gibs, lead nuts, column,
        > headstock) before using your mill in earnest. Mine was way out of
        > tune when it was delivered, and even if yours is in great shape you'll
        > learn a lot that will be useful as you work with it.
        >
        > Ken
        >

        That's a good idea. I was thinking I might need to do that even if it's reasonably well aligned. I'm hoping to do panel engraving and PCB routing with this. Both will require a tight machine.
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