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Re: Penn State motors

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  • stinson108_1
    ... Hi There, I bored out a stock taig pully for my Friend s PSI motor. I just chucked up the pulley in my Atlas 618 and bored it out. I was lucky as I din t
    Message 1 of 19 , Jul 1, 2009
      --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, Pete & Pam Boorum <smallife@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi,
      >
      > I just joined this group. Great postings. I am hooked.
      >
      > My business is doll house miniatures. We carry Taig, Sherline and
      > Penn State Industries (Carba-tec) machinery.
      >
      > When the first Carba-tec lathe was introduced with a variable speed
      > motor there were lots of failures. I don't know the cause but I do
      > know there was very little starting torque. The next generation was
      > a motor that had an annoying pause at start. Finally the bugs were
      > worked out and the last 5 years of so have produced in a good motor.
      > We have sold quite a few lathes with no motor problems.
      >
      > So much for the history lesson. Beware of used Penn State Industries
      > (PSI) variable speed motors unless you are sure of the age.
      >
      > Once I bought a return from PSI for a good discount. When I turned
      > it on the machine rotated backwards. The tech guy told me to reverse
      > two wires. I didn't want to do this and sent it back. So, If you
      > get a PSI motor and controller it should be simple to run it
      > backwards so you can put it in board or out board on the lathe. I
      > don't know which wires but the tech at PSI can tell you.
      >
      > Regards,
      >
      > Pete
      > --
      > Pam & Pete Boorum, Smaller Than Life
      > IGMA Artisans
      > On Sebbins Pond, Bedford, NH
      > http://www.smallerthanlife.com
      >


      Hi There,

      I bored out a stock taig pully for my Friend's PSI motor. I just chucked up the pulley in my Atlas 618 and bored it out. I was lucky as I din't cut deep enough to lose the smallest pulley step. I think if you bore the stock pulley through and through, you will ruin the smallest step.

      We just didn't go that deep and the pully is pressed onto the PSI shaft. My buddy Joe filed (dremeled) a flat for the set screw.

      Since we got the stock pulley on the PSI, Joe can drive the taig from ~350 on the low side to about 2500 on the high side. On the low side when he grabbed the chuck to see if there was enough torque? The lathe motor was able to lift the lathe, motor, and aluminum mounting plate off the workbench before he decied that was enough of that.

      Pretty good torque at the low end. I believe it could be stepped down more if need be. Likewise, it can be stepped up a notch or two and I think Joe got like 4500 at the top of the next pulley step.

      I'll try to get Joe to post the speed ranges he measured via handheld tach and later Mach3.

      I helped Joe cnc his lathe so he can turn Pens and bushings etc.. The PSI motor seems fine, I don't think that Joe has had any issues with it overheating or what not.

      Hopefully Joe will read this and chime in :)

      -Ian
    • J. Todd Shultz
      Stinson,   Please, tell me about the CNC setup you did on your friends lathe?  If you would please contact me at j.toddshultz@yahoo.com   Thanks a Million!!
      Message 2 of 19 , Jul 1, 2009
        Stinson,
         
        Please, tell me about the CNC setup you did on your friends lathe?  If you would please contact me at j.toddshultz@...
         
        Thanks a Million!!
        Todd

        --- On Wed, 7/1/09, stinson108_1 <stinson108_1@...> wrote:


        From: stinson108_1 <stinson108_1@...>
        Subject: [taigtools] Re: Penn State motors
        To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, July 1, 2009, 7:10 AM








        --- In taigtools@yahoogrou ps.com, Pete & Pam Boorum <smallife@.. .> wrote:
        >
        > Hi,
        >
        > I just joined this group. Great postings. I am hooked.
        >
        > My business is doll house miniatures. We carry Taig, Sherline and
        > Penn State Industries (Carba-tec) machinery.
        >
        > When the first Carba-tec lathe was introduced with a variable speed
        > motor there were lots of failures. I don't know the cause but I do
        > know there was very little starting torque. The next generation was
        > a motor that had an annoying pause at start. Finally the bugs were
        > worked out and the last 5 years of so have produced in a good motor.
        > We have sold quite a few lathes with no motor problems.
        >
        > So much for the history lesson. Beware of used Penn State Industries
        > (PSI) variable speed motors unless you are sure of the age.
        >
        > Once I bought a return from PSI for a good discount. When I turned
        > it on the machine rotated backwards. The tech guy told me to reverse
        > two wires. I didn't want to do this and sent it back. So, If you
        > get a PSI motor and controller it should be simple to run it
        > backwards so you can put it in board or out board on the lathe. I
        > don't know which wires but the tech at PSI can tell you.
        >
        > Regards,
        >
        > Pete
        > --
        > Pam & Pete Boorum, Smaller Than Life
        > IGMA Artisans
        > On Sebbins Pond, Bedford, NH
        > http://www.smallert hanlife.com
        >

        Hi There,

        I bored out a stock taig pully for my Friend's PSI motor. I just chucked up the pulley in my Atlas 618 and bored it out. I was lucky as I din't cut deep enough to lose the smallest pulley step. I think if you bore the stock pulley through and through, you will ruin the smallest step.

        We just didn't go that deep and the pully is pressed onto the PSI shaft. My buddy Joe filed (dremeled) a flat for the set screw.

        Since we got the stock pulley on the PSI, Joe can drive the taig from ~350 on the low side to about 2500 on the high side. On the low side when he grabbed the chuck to see if there was enough torque? The lathe motor was able to lift the lathe, motor, and aluminum mounting plate off the workbench before he decied that was enough of that.

        Pretty good torque at the low end. I believe it could be stepped down more if need be. Likewise, it can be stepped up a notch or two and I think Joe got like 4500 at the top of the next pulley step.

        I'll try to get Joe to post the speed ranges he measured via handheld tach and later Mach3.

        I helped Joe cnc his lathe so he can turn Pens and bushings etc.. The PSI motor seems fine, I don't think that Joe has had any issues with it overheating or what not.

        Hopefully Joe will read this and chime in :)

        -Ian



















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Joseph Heath
        Hi Pete! Hi Todd! Welcome to the group Pete! With the way Ian (stinson108_1) and I bored the pulley I have it mounted on the PSI motor shaft up to the second
        Message 3 of 19 , Jul 1, 2009
          Hi Pete! Hi Todd!

          Welcome to the group Pete!

          With the way Ian (stinson108_1) and I bored the pulley I have it mounted
          on the PSI motor shaft up to the second step. The first step actually
          extends beyond the shaft. So far it hasn't been a problem. The PSI
          shaft diameter is 14mm so it exceeds the expected 1/2" by a bit. As Ian
          said, you really don't want to bore that 14mm diameter all the way through.

          In Mach3 I have the pulleys configured with RPM ranges (from smallest
          motor-side diameter going up)
          1 - 65-850
          2 - 200-2150
          3 - 250-3150
          4 - 350-4750
          5 - 500-7000

          I really don't run with the higher pulleys, 1 through 4 is the "normal"
          range with most work done on 1 and 2. During setup I managed to smoke
          the PSI controller due to its negative bias and a power supply case
          ground I thought was isolated turned out not to be. Because of that
          I've been running with a KBIC-120 connected to a CNC4PC C6 board which,
          in turn, is tied into Mach3. (I have a replacement PSI controller and
          we'll figure out how to tie it in but it really doesn't seem to drive
          the motor any faster than the KBIC so this effort is low on the priority
          list at he moment.)

          My little Taig had one of the original style carriages. For the CNC
          project I upgraded to the beefier new style (Thanks Nick!) and it has
          worked out well. We chose to mount all the hardware on the back side of
          the lathe so the carriage is turned around. The only modification to
          the lathe itself was drilling three mounting holes in the sides of the
          carriage (I reused the handwheel shaft set screw hole). A couple small
          stepper motors, aluminum mounting plates to capture the carriage and
          bearing blocks to support the Z-axis lead screw (supported on both ends,
          thrust bearing embedded in one end and stabilization bearing in the
          other), the lead screw, some limit switches, power supplies, pulse
          counter hardware and stepper driver board was all it took. ;^) I
          really appreciate Ian's help with this project. It looks simple now
          that we have it together but it was a little intimidating during the
          process.

          At this point the assembly is really overbuilt - 3/8" aluminum plate,
          big bearings, etc. It's very functional and works great but definitely
          wouldn't win any beauty contests. We'll be refining it and "making it
          pretty".

          Oh, I picked up a surplus lot of these KBIC-120s. All were used in an
          automated production environment. I have eight or nine available (all
          tested good driving my motor) and can provide them with either a 1/4 or
          1/2 hp power resistor. If anyone is interested, they're $27.50 USPS
          Priority Mail to your door. Just drop me a note.

          All the best, Joe


          J. Todd Shultz wrote:
          >
          >
          > Stinson,
          >
          > Please, tell me about the CNC setup you did on your friends lathe? If
          > you would please contact me at j.toddshultz@...
          > <mailto:j.toddshultz%40yahoo.com>
          >
          > Thanks a Million!!
          > Todd
          >
          > --- On Wed, 7/1/09, stinson108_1 <stinson108_1@...
          > <mailto:stinson108_1%40yahoo.com>> wrote:
          >
          > From: stinson108_1 <stinson108_1@...
          > <mailto:stinson108_1%40yahoo.com>>
          > Subject: [taigtools] Re: Penn State motors
          > To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com <mailto:taigtools%40yahoogroups.com>
          > Date: Wednesday, July 1, 2009, 7:10 AM
          >
          > --- In taigtools@yahoogrou ps.com, Pete & Pam Boorum <smallife@.. .>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > Hi,
          > >
          > > I just joined this group. Great postings. I am hooked.
          > >
          > > My business is doll house miniatures. We carry Taig, Sherline and
          > > Penn State Industries (Carba-tec) machinery.
          > >
          > > When the first Carba-tec lathe was introduced with a variable speed
          > > motor there were lots of failures. I don't know the cause but I do
          > > know there was very little starting torque. The next generation was
          > > a motor that had an annoying pause at start. Finally the bugs were
          > > worked out and the last 5 years of so have produced in a good motor.
          > > We have sold quite a few lathes with no motor problems.
          > >
          > > So much for the history lesson. Beware of used Penn State Industries
          > > (PSI) variable speed motors unless you are sure of the age.
          > >
          > > Once I bought a return from PSI for a good discount. When I turned
          > > it on the machine rotated backwards. The tech guy told me to reverse
          > > two wires. I didn't want to do this and sent it back. So, If you
          > > get a PSI motor and controller it should be simple to run it
          > > backwards so you can put it in board or out board on the lathe. I
          > > don't know which wires but the tech at PSI can tell you.
          > >
          > > Regards,
          > >
          > > Pete
          > > --
          > > Pam & Pete Boorum, Smaller Than Life
          > > IGMA Artisans
          > > On Sebbins Pond, Bedford, NH
          > > http://www.smallert hanlife.com
          > >
          >
          > Hi There,
          >
          > I bored out a stock taig pully for my Friend's PSI motor. I just
          > chucked up the pulley in my Atlas 618 and bored it out. I was lucky as
          > I din't cut deep enough to lose the smallest pulley step. I think if
          > you bore the stock pulley through and through, you will ruin the
          > smallest step.
          >
          > We just didn't go that deep and the pully is pressed onto the PSI
          > shaft. My buddy Joe filed (dremeled) a flat for the set screw.
          >
          > Since we got the stock pulley on the PSI, Joe can drive the taig from
          > ~350 on the low side to about 2500 on the high side. On the low side
          > when he grabbed the chuck to see if there was enough torque? The lathe
          > motor was able to lift the lathe, motor, and aluminum mounting plate
          > off the workbench before he decied that was enough of that.
          >
          > Pretty good torque at the low end. I believe it could be stepped down
          > more if need be. Likewise, it can be stepped up a notch or two and I
          > think Joe got like 4500 at the top of the next pulley step.
          >
          > I'll try to get Joe to post the speed ranges he measured via handheld
          > tach and later Mach3.
          >
          > I helped Joe cnc his lathe so he can turn Pens and bushings etc.. The
          > PSI motor seems fine, I don't think that Joe has had any issues with
          > it overheating or what not.
          >
          > Hopefully Joe will read this and chime in :)
          >
          > -Ian
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          > __
        • Rolf Andersson
          Hi Pete, and welcome to the list Today, I received one of those motorkits. Since we we have 230V mains here I looked at the PCB for any options to rewire it
          Message 4 of 19 , Jul 3, 2009
            Hi Pete, and welcome to the list

            Today, I received one of those motorkits. Since we we have 230V mains
            here I looked at the PCB for any options to rewire it from the US standard. There are no alternative pins or jumpers, however there
            are a place on the pcb with the text "75K/5W resistor for 220V".
            I wonder if it that simple.... solder in a resitor.....

            Anyone on the list, who knows more?

            Cheers from Sweden
            Rolf



            --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, Pete & Pam Boorum <smallife@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi,
            >
            > I just joined this group. Great postings. I am hooked.
            >
            > My business is doll house miniatures. We carry Taig, Sherline and
            > Penn State Industries (Carba-tec) machinery.
            >
            > When the first Carba-tec lathe was introduced with a variable speed
            > motor there were lots of failures. I don't know the cause but I do
            > know there was very little starting torque. The next generation was
            > a motor that had an annoying pause at start. Finally the bugs were
            > worked out and the last 5 years of so have produced in a good motor.
            > We have sold quite a few lathes with no motor problems.
            >
            > So much for the history lesson. Beware of used Penn State Industries
            > (PSI) variable speed motors unless you are sure of the age.
            >
            > Once I bought a return from PSI for a good discount. When I turned
            > it on the machine rotated backwards. The tech guy told me to reverse
            > two wires. I didn't want to do this and sent it back. So, If you
            > get a PSI motor and controller it should be simple to run it
            > backwards so you can put it in board or out board on the lathe. I
            > don't know which wires but the tech at PSI can tell you.
            >
            > Regards,
            >
            > Pete
            > --
            > Pam & Pete Boorum, Smaller Than Life
            > IGMA Artisans
            > On Sebbins Pond, Bedford, NH
            > http://www.smallerthanlife.com
            >
          • Pete & Pam Boorum
            Hi, As a person who uses the Taig lathe mostly for duplicate turning in wood I have a little different outlook than many of you. Although I turn to the Taig
            Message 5 of 19 , Jan 7, 2010
              Hi,

              As a person who uses the Taig lathe mostly for duplicate turning in
              wood I have a little different outlook than many of you. Although I
              turn to the Taig for some metal projects most of the time my Sherline
              is more suitable for a variety of reasons.

              Here are a couple of comments that apply to recent threads:

              1. I make and sell and adapter to use WW collets from Sherline on
              the head stock of the lathes. This is a Taig blank arbor with a
              taper turned with the compound to fit the collets. I like it for
              fine graver work because there is plenty of clearance to the left of
              the collet for hand work. The hardest part is turning down the
              Sherline draw bar to fit into the smaller Taig spindle bore. It
              acts like stainless and I do it on the Sherline with a special chuck
              I have made out of a blank WW coillet and a live center on the 'knob
              end. It works OK and, believe me, I am not an accomplished
              machinist. (If you go to http://smallerthanlife.com you can see what
              kind of work Pam and I do.

              2. The Taig is far superior to the Sherline as a duplicator lathe
              because you can remove the carriage which gets in the way. It is
              very easy to build indexing blocks on the PSI duplicator which makes
              set up much quicker. The straight steel bed on the lathe allows this
              procedure. We also use the spring loaded live center to speed up
              stock placement. Last year we finished an order for 580 ladder back
              rocking chairs with arms at 1/12 scale. The turning was out of 1/8"
              dowel. I use cup centers that fit over the live center to eliminate
              the need to mark centers. Each chair had three different turnings
              for a total of 3480 parts. I had planned on using the WW collets
              but changed to a Sherline three jaw chuck because the imported dowels
              varied in thickness up to .020". Additionally I had to sand the
              entire dowel because the only material we could find was made on a
              moulder, not turned, and there was a little ridge along most of them.

              3. The easiest way to use any of the Sherline chucks on the Taig is
              to make a ring that slips over the spindle threads between 3/16" and
              1/2" long. I bronze bushing material which reduces the amount to
              turning.

              4. My Taig is fit out with a PSI variable speed motor mounted on a
              piece of 5/4 oak that swivels on a piece of aluminum angle screwed to
              the mounting board. I have also made this arrangement for a
              customer. The hard part was fitting the motor pulley to the larger
              metric shaft. On my lathe I bored the pulley and lost one groove
              which is no big deal. On the customer's lathe I ground down the
              shaft to fit the pulley which was exciting. Someone on the list
              suggested only boring the pulley part way down and reversing the
              motor rotation. This would have worked but I did not want the motor
              hanging way out to the left. (I had to ship it to California.) Next
              time I will see if Taig will make special pulleys to fit the motor.
              (Peatol must have something for Europe.

              I have been using the DC arrangement for over a year and the only
              disadvantage is that I cannot get a really slow speed for turning
              large diameter metal. (I just use the Sherline) The variable speed
              is great for wood in the scale I use.

              I hope this helps somebody out. It is certainly way outside the box.

              Regards,

              Pete


              --
              Pam & Pete Boorum, Smaller Than Life
              IGMA Artisans
              On Sebbins Pond, Bedford, NH
              http://www.smallerthanlife.com
            • David Robertson
              Pete, There have been notes on this group about adjusting the low speed pot on the control board of the PSI variable Speed motor to lower the minimum speed. I
              Message 6 of 19 , Jan 7, 2010
                Pete,

                There have been notes on this group about adjusting the low speed pot on
                the control board of the PSI variable Speed motor to lower the minimum
                speed. I haven't personally tried it, but the person that did it
                reported satisfactory results.

                Look at messages 28973 and 28992 for details from the guy that did it.

                David

                Pete & Pam Boorum wrote:
                >
                >
                > >>snip
                >
                >
                > I have been using the DC arrangement for over a year and the only
                > disadvantage is that I cannot get a really slow speed for turning
                > large diameter metal. (I just use the Sherline) The variable speed
                > is great for wood in the scale I use.
                >
                > I hope this helps somebody out. It is certainly way outside the box.
                >
                > Regards,
                >
                > Pete
                >
                > --
                > Pam & Pete Boorum, Smaller Than Life
                > IGMA Artisans
                > On Sebbins Pond, Bedford, NH
                > http://www.smallerthanlife.com <http://www.smallerthanlife.com>
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Tony Jeffree
                I find with my two variable speed motors that at low speeds you start to get a cogging effect - the rotation isn t smooth and even, and the only real fix is
                Message 7 of 19 , Jan 7, 2010
                  I find with my two variable speed motors that at low speeds you start to get
                  a "cogging" effect - the rotation isn't smooth and even, and the only real
                  fix is reduction gearing. Unfortunately, this is one of the reasons why
                  bigger lathes have jack shafts and back gearing...

                  Regards,
                  Tony


                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: taigtools@yahoogroups.com [mailto:taigtools@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                  Of David Robertson
                  Sent: 07 January 2010 4:45 PM
                  To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [taigtools] Penn State motors

                  Pete,

                  There have been notes on this group about adjusting the low speed pot on
                  the control board of the PSI variable Speed motor to lower the minimum
                  speed. I haven't personally tried it, but the person that did it
                  reported satisfactory results.

                  Look at messages 28973 and 28992 for details from the guy that did it.

                  David

                  Pete & Pam Boorum wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > >>snip
                  >
                  >
                  > I have been using the DC arrangement for over a year and the only
                  > disadvantage is that I cannot get a really slow speed for turning
                  > large diameter metal. (I just use the Sherline) The variable speed
                  > is great for wood in the scale I use.
                  >
                  > I hope this helps somebody out. It is certainly way outside the box.
                  >
                  > Regards,
                  >
                  > Pete
                  >
                  > --
                  > Pam & Pete Boorum, Smaller Than Life
                  > IGMA Artisans
                  > On Sebbins Pond, Bedford, NH
                  > http://www.smallerthanlife.com <http://www.smallerthanlife.com>
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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                • Dean
                  Hi Pete; I had a look at your web pages. You make some beautiful pieces. Truly miniature furniture, represented as art! Very nice work. I use a GS motor on
                  Message 8 of 19 , Jan 7, 2010
                    Hi Pete;
                    I had a look at your web pages. You make some beautiful pieces. Truly miniature furniture, represented as art! Very nice work.

                    I use a GS motor on my lathe, which mounts directly to the headstock. It's powered by an MC-60 controller, and has plenty of low speed torque. Quite a lot, really, down to about 75 rpm.
                    I turned the flywheels for my latest engine using this motor. They are over 4" diameter, made from DOM steel. You can see a pic of the flywheel rims being cut here:

                    http://www.deansphotographica.com/machining/engines/rudyhoriz/48.jpg

                    And the completed steam engine here:

                    http://www.deansphotographica.com/machining/engines/rudyhoriz/315.jpg
                    and
                    http://www.deansphotographica.com/machining/engines/rudyhoriz/316.jpg

                    (yes, it runs.)

                    Dean


                    --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, Pete & Pam Boorum <smallife@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi,
                    >
                    > As a person who uses the Taig lathe mostly for duplicate turning in
                    > wood I have a little different outlook than many of you. Although I
                    > turn to the Taig for some metal projects most of the time my Sherline
                    > is more suitable for a variety of reasons.
                    >
                    > Here are a couple of comments that apply to recent threads:
                    >
                    > 1. I make and sell and adapter to use WW collets from Sherline on
                    > the head stock of the lathes. This is a Taig blank arbor with a
                    > taper turned with the compound to fit the collets. I like it for
                    > fine graver work because there is plenty of clearance to the left of
                    > the collet for hand work. The hardest part is turning down the
                    > Sherline draw bar to fit into the smaller Taig spindle bore. It
                    > acts like stainless and I do it on the Sherline with a special chuck
                    > I have made out of a blank WW coillet and a live center on the 'knob
                    > end. It works OK and, believe me, I am not an accomplished
                    > machinist. (If you go to http://smallerthanlife.com you can see what
                    > kind of work Pam and I do.
                    >
                    > 2. The Taig is far superior to the Sherline as a duplicator lathe
                    > because you can remove the carriage which gets in the way. It is
                    > very easy to build indexing blocks on the PSI duplicator which makes
                    > set up much quicker. The straight steel bed on the lathe allows this
                    > procedure. We also use the spring loaded live center to speed up
                    > stock placement. Last year we finished an order for 580 ladder back
                    > rocking chairs with arms at 1/12 scale. The turning was out of 1/8"
                    > dowel. I use cup centers that fit over the live center to eliminate
                    > the need to mark centers. Each chair had three different turnings
                    > for a total of 3480 parts. I had planned on using the WW collets
                    > but changed to a Sherline three jaw chuck because the imported dowels
                    > varied in thickness up to .020". Additionally I had to sand the
                    > entire dowel because the only material we could find was made on a
                    > moulder, not turned, and there was a little ridge along most of them.
                    >
                    > 3. The easiest way to use any of the Sherline chucks on the Taig is
                    > to make a ring that slips over the spindle threads between 3/16" and
                    > 1/2" long. I bronze bushing material which reduces the amount to
                    > turning.
                    >
                    > 4. My Taig is fit out with a PSI variable speed motor mounted on a
                    > piece of 5/4 oak that swivels on a piece of aluminum angle screwed to
                    > the mounting board. I have also made this arrangement for a
                    > customer. The hard part was fitting the motor pulley to the larger
                    > metric shaft. On my lathe I bored the pulley and lost one groove
                    > which is no big deal. On the customer's lathe I ground down the
                    > shaft to fit the pulley which was exciting. Someone on the list
                    > suggested only boring the pulley part way down and reversing the
                    > motor rotation. This would have worked but I did not want the motor
                    > hanging way out to the left. (I had to ship it to California.) Next
                    > time I will see if Taig will make special pulleys to fit the motor.
                    > (Peatol must have something for Europe.
                    >
                    > I have been using the DC arrangement for over a year and the only
                    > disadvantage is that I cannot get a really slow speed for turning
                    > large diameter metal. (I just use the Sherline) The variable speed
                    > is great for wood in the scale I use.
                    >
                    > I hope this helps somebody out. It is certainly way outside the box.
                    >
                    > Regards,
                    >
                    > Pete
                    >
                    >
                    > --
                    > Pam & Pete Boorum, Smaller Than Life
                    > IGMA Artisans
                    > On Sebbins Pond, Bedford, NH
                    > http://www.smallerthanlife.com
                    >
                  • Clif Lowry
                    Pete & Pam, I adjusted the pots inside the controller to get a zero base. Works great; very smooth. Clif _____ From: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
                    Message 9 of 19 , Jan 7, 2010
                      Pete & Pam,



                      I adjusted the pots inside the controller to get a zero base. Works great;
                      very smooth. Clif



                      _____

                      From: taigtools@yahoogroups.com [mailto:taigtools@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                      Of Pete & Pam Boorum
                      Sent: Thursday, January 07, 2010 9:11 AM
                      To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [taigtools] Penn State motors





                      Hi,

                      As a person who uses the Taig lathe mostly for duplicate turning in
                      wood I have a little different outlook than many of you. Although I
                      turn to the Taig for some metal projects most of the time my Sherline
                      is more suitable for a variety of reasons.

                      Here are a couple of comments that apply to recent threads:

                      1. I make and sell and adapter to use WW collets from Sherline on
                      the head stock of the lathes. This is a Taig blank arbor with a
                      taper turned with the compound to fit the collets. I like it for
                      fine graver work because there is plenty of clearance to the left of
                      the collet for hand work. The hardest part is turning down the
                      Sherline draw bar to fit into the smaller Taig spindle bore. It
                      acts like stainless and I do it on the Sherline with a special chuck
                      I have made out of a blank WW coillet and a live center on the 'knob
                      end. It works OK and, believe me, I am not an accomplished
                      machinist. (If you go to http://smallerthanl <http://smallerthanlife.com>
                      ife.com you can see what
                      kind of work Pam and I do.

                      2. The Taig is far superior to the Sherline as a duplicator lathe
                      because you can remove the carriage which gets in the way. It is
                      very easy to build indexing blocks on the PSI duplicator which makes
                      set up much quicker. The straight steel bed on the lathe allows this
                      procedure. We also use the spring loaded live center to speed up
                      stock placement. Last year we finished an order for 580 ladder back
                      rocking chairs with arms at 1/12 scale. The turning was out of 1/8"
                      dowel. I use cup centers that fit over the live center to eliminate
                      the need to mark centers. Each chair had three different turnings
                      for a total of 3480 parts. I had planned on using the WW collets
                      but changed to a Sherline three jaw chuck because the imported dowels
                      varied in thickness up to .020". Additionally I had to sand the
                      entire dowel because the only material we could find was made on a
                      moulder, not turned, and there was a little ridge along most of them.

                      3. The easiest way to use any of the Sherline chucks on the Taig is
                      to make a ring that slips over the spindle threads between 3/16" and
                      1/2" long. I bronze bushing material which reduces the amount to
                      turning.

                      4. My Taig is fit out with a PSI variable speed motor mounted on a
                      piece of 5/4 oak that swivels on a piece of aluminum angle screwed to
                      the mounting board. I have also made this arrangement for a
                      customer. The hard part was fitting the motor pulley to the larger
                      metric shaft. On my lathe I bored the pulley and lost one groove
                      which is no big deal. On the customer's lathe I ground down the
                      shaft to fit the pulley which was exciting. Someone on the list
                      suggested only boring the pulley part way down and reversing the
                      motor rotation. This would have worked but I did not want the motor
                      hanging way out to the left. (I had to ship it to California.) Next
                      time I will see if Taig will make special pulleys to fit the motor.
                      (Peatol must have something for Europe.

                      I have been using the DC arrangement for over a year and the only
                      disadvantage is that I cannot get a really slow speed for turning
                      large diameter metal. (I just use the Sherline) The variable speed
                      is great for wood in the scale I use.

                      I hope this helps somebody out. It is certainly way outside the box.

                      Regards,

                      Pete

                      --
                      Pam & Pete Boorum, Smaller Than Life
                      IGMA Artisans
                      On Sebbins Pond, Bedford, NH
                      http://www.smallert <http://www.smallerthanlife.com> hanlife.com





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Mike Nicewonger
                      ... Clif, Could you elaborate please? I suspect what you are referring to would solve a problem for me with one of my MC60 s. -- Mike N Everything I say is
                      Message 10 of 19 , Jan 7, 2010
                        On Jan 7, 2010, at 7:46 PM, Clif Lowry wrote:

                        > Pete & Pam,
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > I adjusted the pots inside the controller to get a zero base.
                        > Works great;
                        > very smooth. Clif

                        Clif,

                        Could you elaborate please? I suspect what you are referring to would
                        solve a problem for me with one of my MC60's.

                        --
                        Mike N

                        Everything I say is fully substaniated by my own opinions.
                      • Clif Lowry
                        Mike, I simply took the cover off the controller to reveal two potentiometers in the upper right hand corner. Since I am electronically challenged, I marked
                        Message 11 of 19 , Jan 10, 2010
                          Mike,



                          I simply took the cover off the controller to reveal two potentiometers in
                          the upper right hand corner. Since I am electronically challenged, I marked
                          their factory settings and started making changes; I apologize in advance
                          for not remembering which one I changed that gave me a zero low end. But
                          it's doable and it ramps ups very smoothly. If I had it to do over, I would
                          probably call Tech Support for assistance, realizing, of course, that you
                          may void your warranty!! Good luck. Clif

                          _____



                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Will Schmit
                          Don t do it (call tech support). First, they feel that you should only put their product on a wood lathe. I had to beg them to sell it to me. I had to assure
                          Message 12 of 19 , Jan 10, 2010
                            Don't do it (call tech support).
                            First, they feel that you should only put their product on a wood lathe. I had to beg them to sell it to me. I had to assure them that I knew that it wouldn't work "out of the box".
                            Second, they feel that you should be using their pulley set -- If you follow their rules, (they think) you will never need to open the box.

                            Of course, they don't know the joy of turning a part in the 4 jaw independent, about 2 lbs, and an inch off center. Turning at 2400 rpm would void YOUR warranty (forget about the motor).

                            The 2 pots inside are really simple -- I forget, but I think one was bottom speed, the other was top speed. I had to reverse the rotation too --- a no brainer.




                            ________________________________
                            From: Clif Lowry <CLOWRY@...>
                            To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Sun, January 10, 2010 12:57:55 PM
                            Subject: RE: [taigtools] Penn State motors


                            Mike,

                            I simply took the cover off the controller to reveal two potentiometers in
                            the upper right hand corner. Since I am electronically challenged, I marked
                            their factory settings and started making changes; I apologize in advance
                            for not remembering which one I changed that gave me a zero low end. But
                            it's doable and it ramps ups very smoothly. If I had it to do over, I would
                            probably call Tech Support for assistance, realizing, of course, that you
                            may void your warranty!! Good luck. Clif

                            _____

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Mike Nicewonger
                            Thanks. ... -- Mike N No, I m not getting crankier as I get older. That s not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more these days.
                            Message 13 of 19 , Jan 10, 2010
                              Thanks.

                              On Jan 10, 2010, at 2:57 PM, Clif Lowry wrote:

                              > I simply took the cover off the controller to reveal two
                              > potentiometers in
                              > the upper right hand corner. Since I am electronically challenged,
                              > I marked
                              > their factory settings and started making changes; I apologize in
                              > advance
                              > for not remembering which one I changed that gave me a zero low
                              > end. But
                              > it's doable and it ramps ups very smoothly. If I had it to do
                              > over, I would
                              > probably call Tech Support for assistance, realizing, of course,
                              > that you
                              > may void your warranty!! Good luck. Clif

                              --
                              Mike N

                              No, I'm not getting crankier as I get older. That's not it.
                              I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more these days.
                            • RDG
                              according to ups I am scheduled for delivery tomorrow, Monday...hopefully I can figure it out..it s the no-brainer ones that always seem to throw me..LOL I m
                              Message 14 of 19 , Jan 10, 2010
                                according to ups I am scheduled for delivery tomorrow, Monday...hopefully I can figure it out..it's the no-brainer ones that always seem to throw me..LOL

                                I'm really looking forward to having the ability to slow the speed down and increase same without moving a belt...

                                Russell




                                ________________________________
                                From: Will Schmit <anchornm@...>
                                To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Sun, January 10, 2010 2:08:45 PM
                                Subject: Re: [taigtools] Penn State motors

                                 
                                Don't do it (call tech support).
                                First, they feel that you should only put their product on a wood lathe. I had to beg them to sell it to me. I had to assure them that I knew that it wouldn't work "out of the box".
                                Second, they feel that you should be using their pulley set -- If you follow their rules, (they think) you will never need to open the box.

                                Of course, they don't know the joy of turning a part in the 4 jaw independent, about 2 lbs, and an inch off center. Turning at 2400 rpm would void YOUR warranty (forget about the motor).

                                The 2 pots inside are really simple -- I forget, but I think one was bottom speed, the other was top speed. I had to reverse the rotation too --- a no brainer.

                                ____________ _________ _________ __
                                From: Clif Lowry <CLOWRY@SATX. RR.COM>
                                To: taigtools@yahoogrou ps.com
                                Sent: Sun, January 10, 2010 12:57:55 PM
                                Subject: RE: [taigtools] Penn State motors

                                Mike,

                                I simply took the cover off the controller to reveal two potentiometers in
                                the upper right hand corner. Since I am electronically challenged, I marked
                                their factory settings and started making changes; I apologize in advance
                                for not remembering which one I changed that gave me a zero low end. But
                                it's doable and it ramps ups very smoothly. If I had it to do over, I would
                                probably call Tech Support for assistance, realizing, of course, that you
                                may void your warranty!! Good luck. Clif

                                _____

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Pete & Pam Boorum
                                Hi, The same thing happened to me with the motor pulley as with Russell. I lost the small groove. On the second machine I filed down the motor shaft end
                                Message 15 of 19 , Jan 18, 2010
                                  Hi,

                                  The same thing happened to me with the motor pulley as with Russell.
                                  I lost the small groove. On the second machine I filed down the
                                  motor shaft end while it was running slow. It was time consuming but
                                  it worked without wobble. Didn't bore the pulley.

                                  I do agree with Russell. Next time I will bore out the pulley and
                                  lose the smallest grove. It won't be a problem with the variable
                                  speed motor and adjusting the pots.

                                  Pete
                                  --
                                  Pam & Pete Boorum, Smaller Than Life
                                  IGMA Artisans
                                  On Sebbins Pond, Bedford, NH
                                  http://www.smallerthanlife.com
                                • Bertho Boman
                                  Can you not keep the small pulley on the outside and then only partially bore out the pulley? If the motor shaft is too long it is easy to cut it off. Bertho
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Jan 18, 2010
                                    Can you not keep the small pulley on the outside and then only partially
                                    bore out the pulley?
                                    If the motor shaft is too long it is easy to cut it off.
                                    Bertho
                                    ==========

                                    From: Pete & Pam Boorum Sent: Monday, January 18, 2010 09:25
                                    Hi,
                                    The same thing happened to me with the motor pulley as with Russell.
                                    I lost the small groove. On the second machine I filed down the
                                    motor shaft end while it was running slow. It was time consuming but
                                    it worked without wobble. Didn't bore the pulley.

                                    I do agree with Russell. Next time I will bore out the pulley and
                                    lose the smallest grove. It won't be a problem with the variable
                                    speed motor and adjusting the pots.
                                    Pete
                                  • Pete & Pam Boorum
                                    Yes, that would work well, but: With the motor outboard of the lathe there are transportation and shipping issues . I do demos with this lathe at shows and
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Jan 19, 2010
                                      Yes, that would work well, but:

                                      With the motor outboard of the lathe there are transportation and
                                      shipping issues . I do demos with this lathe at shows and teach
                                      classes. Also we want to keep the base footprint as small as
                                      possible for shipping. Most of our customers do not have the
                                      experience or equipment to make their own bases.

                                      Pete


                                      ==========
                                      Can you not keep the small pulley on the outside and then only partially
                                      bore out the pulley?
                                      If the motor shaft is too long it is easy to cut it off.
                                      Bertho
                                      ==========

                                      From: Pete & Pam Boorum Sent: Monday, January 18, 2010 09:25
                                      Hi,
                                      The same thing happened to me with the motor pulley as with Russell.
                                      I lost the small groove. On the second machine I filed down the
                                      motor shaft end while it was running slow. It was time consuming but
                                      it worked without wobble. Didn't bore the pulley.

                                      I do agree with Russell. Next time I will bore out the pulley and
                                      lose the smallest grove. It won't be a problem with the variable
                                      speed motor and adjusting the pots.
                                      Pete
                                      --
                                      Pam & Pete Boorum, Smaller Than Life
                                      IGMA Artisans
                                      On Sebbins Pond, Bedford, NH
                                      http://www.smallerthanlife.com
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