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dfm/loose thread slop/o80908 /11:01ESST

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  • DennisF MacIntyre
    ... From: DennisF MacIntyre To: taig files Sent: Sunday, September 7, 2008 11:26:21 PM Subject: [taigfiles]
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 8, 2008
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      ----- Original Message ----
      From: DennisF MacIntyre <a1g2r3i@...>
      To: taig files <taigfiles@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, September 7, 2008 11:26:21 PM
      Subject: [taigfiles] dfm/loose thread slop/o80905 /10:34ESST


      Dear Group
            I am wondering if one could get rid of slop in the screw used for raising and lowering a mill head such as a taig  and also be able to have an adjustment built in to it to control the amount of thread contact. I am speaking of percentage of thread contact in not the usual manner. Please let me explain the idea I had.  - - - turn two screws and then machine a dovetail into both screws so the one will slide into the other.  This would reduce  the two screws to one. Ease the edges of each half screw so each edge doesn't act like a cutting tool on the  contacting nut and then fit both half dove-tales together. At both ends of one of the half's put a threaded hole on an angle to control the relationship of how far length-wise the tip of the one thread of one of the two half threads would be from the other after setscrews are fitted to work like gibb screws on the other half of the screw.  Now the question. Would this pipe dream
      work?    As both dissimilar metals of the screw and nut wore the idea suggests that the slack from ware could be taken up by slacking off the gib screw on the one end and tightening up the one on the other end.

      dennis mac
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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Pierre Coueffin
      I think that the adjustment you are describing is similar to what an anti-backlash nut does. The AB nut has much smaller surfaces to align and machine though,
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 8, 2008
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        I think that the adjustment you are describing is similar to what an
        anti-backlash nut does. The AB nut has much smaller surfaces to align
        and machine though, so it would be cheaper and easier to manufacture.

        Could your approach be altered to make two nuts and cut and dovetail
        them? If they were an inch or two long, I could see that as a viable
        option.

        On Mon, Sep 8, 2008 at 8:02 PM, DennisF MacIntyre <a1g2r3i@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ----- Original Message ----
        > From: DennisF MacIntyre <a1g2r3i@...>
        > To: taig files <taigfiles@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Sunday, September 7, 2008 11:26:21 PM
        > Subject: [taigfiles] dfm/loose thread slop/o80905 /10:34ESST
        >
        >
        > Dear Group
        > I am wondering if one could get rid of slop in the screw used for raising and lowering a mill head such as a taig and also be able to have an adjustment built in to it to control the amount of thread contact. I am speaking of percentage of thread contact in not the usual manner. Please let me explain the idea I had. - - - turn two screws and then machine a dovetail into both screws so the one will slide into the other. This would reduce the two screws to one. Ease the edges of each half screw so each edge doesn't act like a cutting tool on the contacting nut and then fit both half dove-tales together. At both ends of one of the half's put a threaded hole on an angle to control the relationship of how far length-wise the tip of the one thread of one of the two half threads would be from the other after setscrews are fitted to work like gibb screws on the other half of the screw. Now the question. Would this pipe dream
        > work? As both dissimilar metals of the screw and nut wore the idea suggests that the slack from ware could be taken up by slacking off the gib screw on the one end and tightening up the one on the other end.
        >
        > dennis mac
        > ________________________________
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        >
        >
        > __________________________________________________________________
        > Looking for the perfect gift? Give the gift of Flickr!
        >
        > http://www.flickr.com/gift/
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
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      • Michael Fagan
        A standard antibacklash nut has two nuts threaded onto the same leadscrew, connected with either (usually) three screws or, even better, a large diameter
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 8, 2008
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          A standard antibacklash nut has two nuts threaded onto the same
          leadscrew, connected with either (usually) three screws or, even
          better, a large diameter threaded sleeve. These allow the two nuts to
          be pushed apart or pulled together, such that one nut is bearing on
          either thread flank, removing the backlash.
          You can also split the nut along its length and pull it together that
          way, but it is not nearly as adjustable. Usually all that is needed
          is a slit and a pinch bolt, not a full dovetail sliding mechanism,
          since the range of adjustment is usually only a few tens of
          thousandths.

          On Mon, Sep 8, 2008 at 11:49 PM, Pierre Coueffin <pcoueffin@...> wrote:
          > I think that the adjustment you are describing is similar to what an
          > anti-backlash nut does. The AB nut has much smaller surfaces to align
          > and machine though, so it would be cheaper and easier to manufacture.
          >
          > Could your approach be altered to make two nuts and cut and dovetail
          > them? If they were an inch or two long, I could see that as a viable
          > option.
          >
          > On Mon, Sep 8, 2008 at 8:02 PM, DennisF MacIntyre <a1g2r3i@...> wrote:
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> ----- Original Message ----
          >> From: DennisF MacIntyre <a1g2r3i@...>
          >> To: taig files <taigfiles@yahoogroups.com>
          >> Sent: Sunday, September 7, 2008 11:26:21 PM
          >> Subject: [taigfiles] dfm/loose thread slop/o80905 /10:34ESST
          >>
          >>
          >> Dear Group
          >> I am wondering if one could get rid of slop in the screw used for raising
          >> and lowering a mill head such as a taig and also be able to have an
          >> adjustment built in to it to control the amount of thread contact. I am
          >> speaking of percentage of thread contact in not the usual manner. Please let
          >> me explain the idea I had. - - - turn two screws and then machine a dovetail
          >> into both screws so the one will slide into the other. This would reduce the
          >> two screws to one. Ease the edges of each half screw so each edge doesn't
          >> act like a cutting tool on the contacting nut and then fit both half
          >> dove-tales together. At both ends of one of the half's put a threaded hole
          >> on an angle to control the relationship of how far length-wise the tip of
          >> the one thread of one of the two half threads would be from the other after
          >> setscrews are fitted to work like gibb screws on the other half of the
          >> screw. Now the question. Would this pipe dream
          >> work? As both dissimilar metals of the screw and nut wore the idea
          >> suggests that the slack from ware could be taken up by slacking off the gib
          >> screw on the one end and tightening up the one on the other end.
          >>
          >> dennis mac
          >> ________________________________
          >> Looking for the perfect gift?Give the gift of Flickr!
          >>
          >>
          >> __________________________________________________________
          >> Looking for the perfect gift? Give the gift of Flickr!
          >>
          >> http://www.flickr.com/gift/
          >>
          >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >>
          >>
          >> ------------------------------------
          >>
          >> To Post a message, send it to:
          >> taigtools@yahoogroups.com
          >>
          >> To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
          >> taigtools-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >>
          >> Let the chips fly!
          >> Yahoo! Groups Links
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >
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