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Re: [taigtools] Question about the Taig Lathe!

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  • Tony Jeffree
    ... The Taig lathe is very far from worthless - take a look at some of the stuff in the files section of this eGroup, on Nick Carter s webpage, on my own
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 5, 2001
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      At 02:13 05/03/2001 +0000, you wrote:
      > I was wondering whether or not to buy a Taig Lathe or not. I see
      >that alot of people use the 7x10 Mini-Lathe but only one or two that
      >I have seen use the Taig. From the pics at the Taig website it looks
      >rather anemic! I know looks can be decieving but I only run much
      >larger lathes at work so I'd like to know what people think. I see
      >that the Taig is cheaper price wise but I'd rather spend a little
      >more money on something more substantial if the Taig is worthless.
      >Any and All help would greatly be appreciated.

      The Taig lathe is very far from worthless - take a look at some of the
      stuff in the files section of this eGroup, on Nick Carter's webpage, on my
      own webpage....etc. to see the kind of things that can be done with it.
      Having said that, as others have observed, a tool is only useful within its
      operating envelope, and therefore, the first step in choosing the right
      lathe is to decide what you will expect it to do for you. I bought mine
      with clockmaking and related toolmaking activities in mind; I also have a
      Myford ML7 for stuff that is outside the scope of the Taig's working
      envelope. For small items, I will use the Taig in preference to the ML7,
      as it is often easier to set up & use than the ML7 for fine work. For
      larger items, there is no sensible alternative but to use the bigger lathe.

      Having seen the 7x10 equivalent machines on sale here in the UK, my own
      choice of small lathe would still be the Taig, unless I had the time to
      treat the 7x10 as a "lathe kit" and re-finish it.

      Regards,
      Tony
    • Larry Richter
      ... There is a problem with the Chinese machine tools in that the Chinese don t hold to fixed quality standards unless there is a human force holding them to
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 8, 2001
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        tadici283@... wrote:

        >
        > Those of us that have both the Taig and the HF 7x10 know that the HF does
        > take some fixing up to get it to "work" , I have read some rather harsh words
        > on the little
        > 7x10 wonder, that may or may not be a good representative of the machines
        > capabilities, but in fairness I can say that the machine is not in my opinion
        > trash,
        > Please no flame wars as to "yes it is, no it isn't", this machine has several
        > features that the Taig doesn't have like built in threading, a frog is nearly
        > half the cost of this lathe, and the machine also has variable speed, yes you
        > can add this via treadmill motor and that is what many of us did with our
        > Taigs, but it is included. The biggest feature of this lathe is weight, it
        > weights some where in the 85 LB area, a lot heaver than that of the Taig and
        > has a built in compound, and MT tailstock and headstock
        > and a leadscrew with power feed. I would say that, first that I love my Taig
        > tools the most, but this machine, if you regard it as more of a kit is
        > capable of doing any work that the Taig can do, in fact I have made many
        > tools, and modifications to my Taig with this machine, you can do small work
        > on a large lathe, but you cannot do large work on a small machine and as
        > stated in other posts it depends on what type of work you need to do.
        > Chris of Bradenton FLA

        There is a problem with the Chinese machine tools in that the Chinese don't hold
        to fixed quality standards unless there is a human force holding them to it. They
        sell everything made on a production line, when it is possible to do so, and you
        don't know what you personally have until it shows it's strengths or weakness.
        They rightly know that all things have some value, and they are willing to adjust
        the compensation to reflect a lesser value if they have to, but they also are
        willing to charge you (or your supplier) for your (or your supplier's) ignorance
        if that is possible. Since some suppliers of inexpensive goods may already be
        willing to do this to you themselves, it's double jeapardy.

        Two other matters of the political sort and one of substance: the price of these
        items reflects the way the Chinese manufacture, which, in short, is in the
        environmental style of the U.S in the 1880's. They have foundries mixed in with
        machining areas and they measure nothing but cost and output, unless the customer
        organization provides or controls facilities. You can do a lot, cheap, if you can
        turn wooden carvings into iron parts on the spot, but the boss will want to live
        someplace else and the quality will vary, and there will not be a park on the
        worksite after it is abandoned. You personally get the machine cheap partly
        because the money cost of the damage caused by making it will be paid by someone
        else, later. Second, the boss will also likely be living somewhere else because
        the workforce in a number of cases will not be free, even in the ordinary sense
        of a Chinese citizen. If you think the Chinese are a people who will be helped
        best by being led out into the world of commerce, this would mean one thing to
        you. If you think of them as something else, then it might mean something else.

        The last matter is that repair parts are usually either not or barely available.
        You may not need them. if you do, and they are available, they may require
        fitting of the kind that is also associated with the 1880's, easy with the right
        experience and equipment but a puzzle without it.

        If you can shim, fit and think mech, you can make the HF or similar things work
        just fine. It may work fine anyway. If you stay healthy or have a Hyster, you can
        even lift 'em.

        If you get the Taig, you get a beautiful little lathe that is simple and seems to
        never break. It has excellent materials, the design is upfront and
        straightforward. If you don't understand it after a long look, well, there are
        other hobbies. If you hurt your back, you can get your wife to move it for you.
        Parts and accessories and tooling are at beer money pricing and are a day or two
        away at most. You can talk to anybody in the chain of supply at US long distance
        rates. It has faults, like the upward facing rack and no bed long enough for
        rifle barrels, but there will be very few days that find you regretting you
        bought it.
      • tadici283@cs.com
        In a message dated 3/5/2001 4:54:29 AM Pacific Standard Time, ... Those of us that have both the Taig and the HF 7x10 know that the HF does take some fixing up
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 8, 2001
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          In a message dated 3/5/2001 4:54:29 AM Pacific Standard Time,
          luser@... writes:


          > --- In taigtools@y..., "Ed" <freakslikeme9909@y...> wrote:
          > > I was wondering whether or not to buy a Taig Lathe or not. I see
          > > that alot of people use the 7x10 Mini-Lathe but only one or two that
          > > I have seen use the Taig. From the pics at the Taig website it
          > looks
          > > rather anemic! I know looks can be decieving but I only run much
          > > larger lathes at work so I'd like to know what people think. I see
          > > that the Taig is cheaper price wise but I'd rather spend a little
          > > more money on something more substantial if the Taig is worthless.
          > > Any and All help would greatly be appreciated.
          > >
          > > Take care,
          > > Ed
          >

          Those of us that have both the Taig and the HF 7x10 know that the HF does
          take some fixing up to get it to "work" , I have read some rather harsh words
          on the little
          7x10 wonder, that may or may not be a good representative of the machines
          capabilities, but in fairness I can say that the machine is not in my opinion
          trash,
          Please no flame wars as to "yes it is, no it isn't", this machine has several
          features that the Taig doesn't have like built in threading, a frog is nearly
          half the cost of this lathe, and the machine also has variable speed, yes you
          can add this via treadmill motor and that is what many of us did with our
          Taigs, but it is included. The biggest feature of this lathe is weight, it
          weights some where in the 85 LB area, a lot heaver than that of the Taig and
          has a built in compound, and MT tailstock and headstock
          and a leadscrew with power feed. I would say that, first that I love my Taig
          tools the most, but this machine, if you regard it as more of a kit is
          capable of doing any work that the Taig can do, in fact I have made many
          tools, and modifications to my Taig with this machine, you can do small work
          on a large lathe, but you cannot do large work on a small machine and as
          stated in other posts it depends on what type of work you need to do.
          Chris of Bradenton FLA


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