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Machining a 50 cent coin

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  • crinz83
    Basically, I want to shave down the diameter of a Kennedy half, and make a shell out of another, so that the former fits into the latter. The reduced diameter
    Message 1 of 32 , Dec 2, 2007
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      Basically, I want to shave down the diameter of a Kennedy half, and
      make a shell out of another, so that the former fits into the latter.
      The reduced diameter coin needs to be made out of two coins to be thin
      enough to fit, undetected, in the shell coin.
      So, how do I go about it? I think I'll need to make a couple of pot
      collets. Are there blank collets for a taig that can do this?
      Thanks,
      CRINZ
    • chieftoolmaker
      On machining coins..... I have modified two Schaublin ( Swiss) six jaw scroll chucks ( internal and external) to fit my Sherline lathe. I have made double
      Message 32 of 32 , Jan 8, 2008
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        On machining coins.....
        I have modified two Schaublin ( Swiss) six jaw scroll chucks ( internal and external)
        to fit my Sherline lathe.
        I have made double faced coins from nickels and dimes...
        But, I do not face them in half thickness wise.
        I bore out one coin halfway, and insert the second coin ( head or tail)...
        Press fit and blend and buff the joint, which becomes invisible....
        No heat, no glue , no sweat soldering, etc....
        Won a few beers with them....
        Jerry G (Glickstein)

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Tony Jeffree
        To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, January 08, 2008 2:46 AM
        Subject: Re: [taigtools] Re: Machining a 50 cent coin...UPDATE


        At 07:03 08/01/2008, you wrote:
        >More success!
        >Using the superglue chuck, I shaved down a 50 cent piece, and an
        >English penny. Then I superglued the two together, and did a tiny bit
        >of sanding. Now, JFK and Elizabeth are one. I can't believe how well
        >the superglue chuck works. Either side is completely genuine looking.
        >Thanks for the idea... I'll be using it in the future.

        This is of course just a modern take on the clockmaker's shellac or
        wax chucks. The only thing to watch is that heating of the workpiece
        during machining can soften the superglue, so you have to take light
        cuts or use coolant. I use similar techniques on the mill - superglue
        or double sided tape to hold parts down onto a sacrificial board -
        and that works well too as long as you don't exceed the limitations
        of the glue.

        Regards,
        Tony





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