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Re: [taigtools] DRO danger...

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  • jeff saunders
    Chris, Where can I find information on machining titianium from those that know Best regards jeff ...
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 30, 2007
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      Chris,
      Where can I find information on machining titianium
      from 'those that know'
      Best regards
      jeff

      --- Jim Matheson <d_fex@...> wrote:

      > Chris Ghent wrote:
      > > I appreciate this is not going to apply to many
      > out there, but here's a
      > > warning that might help someone who is using the
      > cheaper bolt on Asian
      > > DROs.
      > >
      > > I turn and mill a lot of titanium, which I find
      > not that difficult if
      > > you follow the suggestions made by "those that
      > know". It creates a
      > > small frisson with people that the metal can
      > actually catch fire but my
      > > experience was that while you might see a
      > particularly white spark
      > > occasionally a fire was really hard to create.
      > Even setting fire to the
      > > chips with a lighter is very difficult, it will
      > start but not sustain.
      > > Yes I confess...
      > >
      > > So today when I glanced around in the seconds
      > between starting and
      > > finishing a cut on auto feed I was somewhat
      > stunned to see a tidy bright
      > > white fire well ablaze behind the ways of my lathe
      > in the splash apron.
      > > I threw a cloth over it and lifted it onto the
      > concrete floor where it
      > > blazed away while I finished my cut (priorities
      > right, do you think?).
      > >
      > > It took a while to realise what had happened. My
      > DRO is slaved to a
      > > large readout, which is powered from the mains.
      > The readout and the
      > > lathe have different earth systems. One is
      > positive earth, the other is
      > > negative. I have made them work together by
      > isolating the DRO from the
      > > body of the lathe. When the fire occurred a bunch
      > of swarf had spun
      > > out and fallen across the gap between the ways and
      > the bar of the DRO,
      > > causing a short. The amperage was enough to heat
      > up the titanium and it
      > > burst into flame. I measured the difference
      > between the two systems at 5
      > > volts.
      > >
      > > There won't be many out there using DROS and
      > titanium, but even
      > > aluminium can burn...
      > >
      > > Best Wishes
      > >
      > > Chris
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > I am surprised anyone still uses positive ground i
      > thought it went out
      > with British car "electrics"
      > anyhow, thanks for the information (that you can set
      > titanium on fire :D )
      >



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    • Chris Ghent
      I use the Taig mill for titanium, but don t have a Taig lathe. If I did I would use it for titanium, the machine doesn t know what its machining. It is not
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 1, 2007
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        I use the Taig mill for titanium, but don't have a Taig lathe. If I did I would use it for titanium, the machine doesn't know what its machining. It is not that different to machining steel. In my experience, not vast, people who speak of titanium being difficult either haven't tried it or have been machining softer and easy items, wood, brass, plastic, in which reasonable results can still come from sloppy practice. With titanium you need to keep your tools sharp and pay attention to feeds and speeds. After that it is just another material. Except that it can catch fire of course...

        Chris


        > Posted by: "Michael Fagan" woodworker88@... woodworker_88
        > Date: Sun Sep 30, 2007 9:09 am ((PDT))
        >
        > Sounds like an interesting situation. What kind of machines do you use to
        > machine titanium. Not a Taig, I assume?
      • Michael Fagan
        Cool. You know, everybody always says that you need special tooling and such, but I ve always wanted to just give it a try. It s just a bit over my budget to
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 1, 2007
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          Cool. You know, everybody always says that you need special tooling and
          such, but I've always wanted to just give it a try. It's just a bit over my
          budget to play around with, but something I'd like to do. Does it take a
          good finish?
          Michael

          On 10/1/07, Chris Ghent <cghent@...> wrote:
          >
          > I use the Taig mill for titanium, but don't have a Taig lathe. If I did
          > I would use it for titanium, the machine doesn't know what its machining. It
          > is not that different to machining steel. In my experience, not vast, people
          > who speak of titanium being difficult either haven't tried it or have been
          > machining softer and easy items, wood, brass, plastic, in which reasonable
          > results can still come from sloppy practice. With titanium you need to keep
          > your tools sharp and pay attention to feeds and speeds. After that it is
          > just another material. Except that it can catch fire of course...
          >
          > Chris
          >
          > > Posted by: "Michael Fagan" woodworker88@...<woodworker88%40gmail.com>woodworker_88
          > > Date: Sun Sep 30, 2007 9:09 am ((PDT))
          > >
          > > Sounds like an interesting situation. What kind of machines do you use
          > to
          > > machine titanium. Not a Taig, I assume?
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Steve Blackmore
          ... From the supplier - but generally speaking you machine it the same as Austenitic Stainless Steel, slow speed, heavy feed with a rigid machine and plenty of
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 1, 2007
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            On Sun, 30 Sep 2007 23:32:26 -0700 (PDT), you wrote:


            >Where can I find information on machining titianium
            >from 'those that know'

            From the supplier - but generally speaking you machine it the same as
            Austenitic Stainless Steel, slow speed, heavy feed with a rigid machine
            and plenty of non-chlorinated coolant.

            Steve Blackmore
            --
          • Rich Crook
            ... Ahh, the Lucas legacy. (Why do Brits drink their beer warm? Lucas refrigeration.) Other than pure oxides, glass (an oxide) and Nomex, *anything
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 2, 2007
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              <snipped>
              > >
              > > There won't be many out there using DROS and titanium, but even
              > > aluminium can burn...
              > >
              > > Best Wishes
              > >
              > > Chris
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >I am surprised anyone still uses positive ground i thought it went out
              >with British car "electrics"
              >anyhow, thanks for the information (that you can set titanium on fire :D )
              >

              Ahh, the Lucas legacy. (Why do Brits drink their beer warm? Lucas
              refrigeration.)
              Other than pure oxides, glass (an oxide) and Nomex, *anything and
              everything* will burn, given the right conditions.
              Even some oxides will burn, creating a different type of oxide...
              Nomex, when exposed to sufficient heat (a *lot* of heat), will
              decompose, but it won't burn (i.e. self-sustaining exothermic oxidation.)

              = Rich =
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