Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [taigtools] Re: gear cutting on taig mill

Expand Messages
  • Steve Blackmore
    ... Hi Johnny - how does the book describe you cut them? Are you simply milling around the shape or putting them in a 4th axis, rotating the blank and cutting
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      On Fri, 01 Jun 2007 03:50:11 -0000, you wrote:


      >Steve, the gears that I plan to cut will be of brass and range
      >from .5 to 1.oo inch in diamater. I probably will use a single point
      >tool. I do not have any experiance at cutting small gears and very
      >little with gears over 2 inches. My gear cutting book simply
      >recommends 60-80 rpm. Please advise me if this is not correct. Can I
      >cut gears with the taig motor low rpm of 500. I am in the process of
      >deciding weather to buy a taig 1900ER or sherline 2000 mill and would
      >like to make shure that the taig will meet my future needs.

      Hi Johnny - how does the book describe you cut them? Are you simply
      milling around the shape or putting them in a 4th axis, rotating the
      blank and cutting each tooth at a time?

      Have a look at the pictures on Tony Jeffree's site at

      http://www.jeffree.co.uk/divisionmaster/examples.html

      6th picture up from the bottom shows a gear being cut, at around 1100
      rpm.

      The bottom pictures show a Centec mill, it's set on mid speed, which is
      probably 895 rpm.

      Steve Blackmore
      --
    • Tony Jeffree
      ... There s another pic here showing a gear being cut on a Taig mill - last picture on this page: http://www.jeffree.co.uk/pages/divheadmk2.html The rest of
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        At 08:31 01/06/2007, you wrote:
        >Have a look at the pictures on Tony Jeffree's site at
        >
        >http://www.jeffree.co.uk/divisionmaster/examples.html
        >
        >6th picture up from the bottom shows a gear being cut, at around 1100
        >rpm.

        There's another pic here showing a gear being cut on a Taig mill -
        last picture on this page:

        http://www.jeffree.co.uk/pages/divheadmk2.html

        The rest of the page tells you how to build the dividing head...

        Regards,
        Tony
      • awolff612000
        I routinely cut brass gears for clocks using a single point cutter, also known as a fly cutter. A flycutter should be run much faster than a multitooth cutter
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 1, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          I routinely cut brass gears for clocks using a single point cutter,
          also known as a fly cutter. A flycutter should be run much faster
          than a multitooth cutter and I have the best results at approximately
          3000 to 4000 RPM. 360 and 353 brass should be cut dry. Use a very
          small amount of cutting fluid if 260 brass is used to keep it from
          sticking to the cutter.
          Allan

          --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "leeharrysouth" <EDAVIS93@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, Steve Blackmore <steve@> wrote:
          > >
          > > On Thu, 31 May 2007 22:39:23 -0000, you wrote:
          > >
          > > >I am considering the purchace of a taig mill, but concerned that
          > taig
          > > >motor speed does not decrease below 500 rpm. I wish to cut small
          > gears
          > > >and have been told that 60 - 80 is a good rpm to do so. Can any
          > one
          > > >provide a little input concerning this matter.
          > >
          > > In what material, of what size, using what technique?
          > >
          > > I can't think of any situation where such a low spindle speed
          would
          > be
          > > necessary.
          > >
          > > Much more information is needed to give any useful advice.
          > >
          >
          > .
          > > Steve Blackmore
          >
          > > --Steve, the gears that I plan to cut will be of brass and range
          > from .5 to 1.oo inch in diamater. I probably will use a single
          point
          > tool. I do not have any experiance at cutting small gears and very
          > little with gears over 2 inches. My gear cutting book simply
          > recommends 60-80 rpm. Please advise me if this is not correct. Can
          I
          > cut gears with the taig motor low rpm of 500. I am in the process
          of
          > deciding weather to buy a taig 1900ER or sherline 2000 mill and
          would
          > like to make shure that the taig will meet my future needs.
          > Thanks, Johnny
          > >
          >
        • leeharrysouth
          ... point ... I ... of ... would ... 1100 ... which is ... Steve, The book,Gears and Gear Cutting by Ivan Law, indicates that the gear blank is to be mounted
          Message 4 of 11 , Jun 2, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, Steve Blackmore <steve@...> wrote:
            >
            > On Fri, 01 Jun 2007 03:50:11 -0000, you wrote:
            >
            >
            > >Steve, the gears that I plan to cut will be of brass and range
            > >from .5 to 1.oo inch in diamater. I probably will use a single
            point
            > >tool. I do not have any experiance at cutting small gears and very
            > >little with gears over 2 inches. My gear cutting book simply
            > >recommends 60-80 rpm. Please advise me if this is not correct. Can
            I
            > >cut gears with the taig motor low rpm of 500. I am in the process
            of
            > >deciding weather to buy a taig 1900ER or sherline 2000 mill and
            would
            > >like to make shure that the taig will meet my future needs.
            >
            > Hi Johnny - how does the book describe you cut them? Are you simply
            > milling around the shape or putting them in a 4th axis, rotating the
            > blank and cutting each tooth at a time?
            >
            > Have a look at the pictures on Tony Jeffree's site at
            >
            > http://www.jeffree.co.uk/divisionmaster/examples.html
            >
            > 6th picture up from the bottom shows a gear being cut, at around
            1100
            > rpm.
            >
            > The bottom pictures show a Centec mill, it's set on mid speed,
            which is
            > probably 895 rpm.
            >
            > Steve Blackmore
            > --
            >
            Steve,
            The book,Gears and Gear Cutting by Ivan Law, indicates that the gear
            blank is to be mounted to a rotory table, indexing head or dividing
            head. The dividing head is mounted on a verticle lath table and a
            single point cuter is attached to the spindle. The single point cuter
            end is ground to match spir gear invulate teeth. The books speed
            table indicates that a home made steel cutting tool should be ran at
            120RPM when cuting a 1.250 Dia. brss spur gear. Could it be that this
            slow cuting speed is recommended as a starting point for those of us
            with limited experiance.

            Johnny
          • David Robertson
            Johnny... are you sure this is RPM and not FPM (feet per minute)? Sure seems slow... even for a beginner.. !! You will be just as screwed at 120 RPM as you
            Message 5 of 11 , Jun 2, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              Johnny... are you sure this is RPM and not FPM (feet per minute)? Sure
              seems slow... even for a beginner.. !! You will be just as screwed at
              120 RPM as you will at 1000 RPM if you make a mistake..

              David

              leeharrysouth wrote:
              >
              > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com <mailto:taigtools%40yahoogroups.com>,
              > Steve Blackmore <steve@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > On Fri, 01 Jun 2007 03:50:11 -0000, you wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > > >Steve, the gears that I plan to cut will be of brass and range
              > > >from .5 to 1.oo inch in diamater. I probably will use a single
              > point
              > > >tool. I do not have any experiance at cutting small gears and very
              > > >little with gears over 2 inches. My gear cutting book simply
              > > >recommends 60-80 rpm. Please advise me if this is not correct. Can
              > I
              > > >cut gears with the taig motor low rpm of 500. I am in the process
              > of
              > > >deciding weather to buy a taig 1900ER or sherline 2000 mill and
              > would
              > > >like to make shure that the taig will meet my future needs.
              > >
              > > Hi Johnny - how does the book describe you cut them? Are you simply
              > > milling around the shape or putting them in a 4th axis, rotating the
              > > blank and cutting each tooth at a time?
              > >
              > > Have a look at the pictures on Tony Jeffree's site at
              > >
              > > http://www.jeffree.co.uk/divisionmaster/examples.html
              > <http://www.jeffree.co.uk/divisionmaster/examples.html>
              > >
              > > 6th picture up from the bottom shows a gear being cut, at around
              > 1100
              > > rpm.
              > >
              > > The bottom pictures show a Centec mill, it's set on mid speed,
              > which is
              > > probably 895 rpm.
              > >
              > > Steve Blackmore
              > > --
              > >
              > Steve,
              > The book,Gears and Gear Cutting by Ivan Law, indicates that the gear
              > blank is to be mounted to a rotory table, indexing head or dividing
              > head. The dividing head is mounted on a verticle lath table and a
              > single point cuter is attached to the spindle. The single point cuter
              > end is ground to match spir gear invulate teeth. The books speed
              > table indicates that a home made steel cutting tool should be ran at
              > 120RPM when cuting a 1.250 Dia. brss spur gear. Could it be that this
              > slow cuting speed is recommended as a starting point for those of us
              > with limited experiance.
              >
              > Johnny
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Steve Blackmore
              ... Just because it was written by someone in a book, it doesn t make it right . Surface speed for Brass using a HSS tool is 300 Feet Per Minute. Cutting a
              Message 6 of 11 , Jun 2, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                On Sat, 02 Jun 2007 18:35:47 -0000, you wrote:


                >The book,Gears and Gear Cutting by Ivan Law, indicates that the gear
                >blank is to be mounted to a rotory table, indexing head or dividing
                >head. The dividing head is mounted on a verticle lath table and a
                >single point cuter is attached to the spindle. The single point cuter
                >end is ground to match spir gear invulate teeth. The books speed
                >table indicates that a home made steel cutting tool should be ran at
                >120RPM when cuting a 1.250 Dia. brss spur gear. Could it be that this
                >slow cuting speed is recommended as a starting point for those of us
                >with limited experiance.

                Just because it was written by someone in a book, it doesn't make it
                "right".

                Surface speed for Brass using a HSS tool is 300 Feet Per Minute.

                Cutting a gear is no different in principle to turning, or milling. The
                same feeds and speeds apply.

                Tables say 900 rpm and a feed rate of 7 ipm with a 15 thou cut using a
                HSS bit for 1/4 HP spindle. If you want to be conservative, halve the
                depth of cut.

                Steve Blackmore
                --
              • leeharrysouth
                ... gear ... dividing ... cuter ... at ... this ... us ... The ... using a ... the ... Your input has givin me quite a bit to ponder. It has certanly cleared
                Message 7 of 11 , Jun 3, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, Steve Blackmore <steve@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > On Sat, 02 Jun 2007 18:35:47 -0000, you wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > >The book,Gears and Gear Cutting by Ivan Law, indicates that the
                  gear
                  > >blank is to be mounted to a rotory table, indexing head or
                  dividing
                  > >head. The dividing head is mounted on a verticle lath table and a
                  > >single point cuter is attached to the spindle. The single point
                  cuter
                  > >end is ground to match spir gear invulate teeth. The books speed
                  > >table indicates that a home made steel cutting tool should be ran
                  at
                  > >120RPM when cuting a 1.250 Dia. brss spur gear. Could it be that
                  this
                  > >slow cuting speed is recommended as a starting point for those of
                  us
                  > >with limited experiance.
                  >
                  > Just because it was written by someone in a book, it doesn't make it
                  > "right".
                  >
                  > Surface speed for Brass using a HSS tool is 300 Feet Per Minute.
                  >
                  > Cutting a gear is no different in principle to turning, or milling.
                  The
                  > same feeds and speeds apply.
                  >
                  > Tables say 900 rpm and a feed rate of 7 ipm with a 15 thou cut
                  using a
                  > HSS bit for 1/4 HP spindle. If you want to be conservative, halve
                  the
                  > depth of cut.
                  >
                  > Steve Blackmore
                  > --
                  >Thank you steve,
                  Your input has givin me quite a bit to ponder. It has certanly
                  cleared up some confusion. I will get a taig mill, get it set up and
                  beat that old lerning curve.
                  Thanks, Johnny
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.