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Re: taig motor

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  • awolff612000
    Greg, I do not have any experience with that particular motor, but based on a similar one, it should work fine depending on your needs . Here are some random
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 2, 2007
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      Greg,
      I do not have any experience with that particular motor, but
      based on a similar one, it should work fine depending on your
      needs . Here are some random comments.
      You will need to come up with a method of belting the motor to the
      lathe. You might get lucky and be able to use the pulley built into
      the flywheel.
      The included flywheel may be a nice feature, but I have found that
      mine works fine without one.
      The motor is rated at 3/4 HP at 130 VDC. Most controllers you will
      find use SCR control. SCR works fine, but if you are using 120 VAC
      to power the controller, the highest voltage obtainable is about 95
      VDC. At 95 volts, you will not get 3/4 HP from the motor, probably
      closer to 1/2 HP or less. That is still a lot of power for a lathe
      the size of the Taig. However, there may be times when you want to
      run the lathe at very slow speed, say 100 RPM or less. Usually
      these low speeds are needed for larger diameter work. It takes a lot
      of torque to keep the lathe turning when you start cutting larger
      diameter pieces. Most SCR controllers have regulation adjustments
      that apply more power to the motor when the load increases to keep
      the speed constant. This helps, but if the motor does not have the
      torque, you can still stall the lathe at low speeds.
      I have heard that PWM controllers provide more low end torque and
      generate less noise from the motor. PWM controllers are harder to
      find and generally cost more. I use an SCR controller and like it
      just fine.
      The permanent magnet motors will make more noise than a single speed
      AC motor no matter what type of controller you use. I do not find
      it objectionable, but others might.

      I will share my configuration. Perhaps this will provide additional
      insight. I purchased a 2.5 HP motor from Surplus Center, item # 10-
      1783. Note that it is rated at 1.5 HP at 95 volts. I picked up a
      Leason 174308 SCR controller on eBay for about $60. This particular
      controller is rated up to 1/2 HP without a heat sink and up to 1 HP
      if a supplmental heat sink is used. I do not use the extra heatsink
      and the unit still remains cool to the touch. The controller also
      has a current limit adjustment, so I think I am pretty safe as is.
      There are always plenty of controllers available, but keep in mind
      that many of those are only the control module. That is OK if you
      want to build a custom enclosure, but requires more work to put it
      in a box and wire it up. I use the same width 3M polyflex belt that
      Taig recommends. I may increase the width to a 5M someday. I
      reduce the speed of the motor approximately 2.5:1 through the drive
      pulleys. I'm not sure what the top end speed is, but it goes faster
      than I ever need. Usable low end speed is probably 20 RPM. The
      belt will slip before the motor stalls, although you can hear the
      motor growl on heavier cuts. I put an external fan on the motor
      drive shaft, but probably did not need to. The motor runs very cool.
      Installing a variable speed DC motor on my Taig has been the best
      upgrade by far. You will not regret it.
      Good luck,
      Allan


      --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Greg McFadden"
      <greg.mcfadden@...> wrote:
      >
      > couple of questions.
      >
      > A. I found this DC motor and I was thinking that it might work
      quite nicely
      > for the taig,... first off, any thoughts and secondly, if
      feasible, can
      > anyone recommend a dc motor controller for it?
      >
      > http://www.surpluscenter.com/item.asp?
      UID=2007022820424970&catname=electric&item=10-2326
      >
      > B. Can anyone tell me the standard taig motor weight/rotation?
      >
      > thanks
      > Greg
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • in2steam
      Greg, You will more then likely find that motor to small for your use. The reason I say that is that your usably RPM is about twice that of a normal DC or ac
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 3, 2007
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        Greg,
        You will more then likely find that motor to small for your use.
        The reason I say that is that your usably RPM is about twice that of
        a normal DC or ac motor used. That basicly means your low speed will
        not work real well and your high speed will be way to fast for your
        bearings to handle. I know some people have used tread mill motors
        with great sucess. HP is based on RPM and torque, if you have alot
        of either you will have a higher HP, I would liken that motor to
        about 1/5 HP AC 2 pole (3600rpm) AC motor or a 1/10 HP 4 pole
        (1800rpm) motor. As also stated in the other post you will not get
        full voltage to that motor as you can only rectify 120 volts out to
        about 90 volts DC.
        You should be looking for a motor in the 1800-3000 RPM range with
        around 1/2 HP max. Anything more and I think you will break things.
        The Taig uses two motors, both near a 1/4HP both are 4 pole 1800 rpm
        (less under load) motors. I am not sure why you want rotation as a
        dc motor you just reverse the leads? I am not sure of the weight,
        but if you are planning to replace the taig mill motor from what I
        undersand it needs to have similiar weight on the head in order for
        the gibs to work correctly. The lathe has a maximuim speed rating of
        5000 rpm out put also if I am not mistaken.



        For simple DC controllers I like DART, and KBIC they both work
        equally well and have few problems in an industrial 3 shift
        operation. Please note tha KBIC sells ressitors that you need add
        for the proper HP. There is no need for a fancy regenerative drive,
        and PWM(high frequency) would be pretty much a waste in this HP
        range. Just a regular old chopper drive.

        Chris



        --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Greg McFadden" <greg.mcfadden@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > couple of questions.
        >
        > A. I found this DC motor and I was thinking that it might work
        quite nicely
        > for the taig,... first off, any thoughts and secondly, if
        feasible, can
        > anyone recommend a dc motor controller for it?
        >
        > http://www.surpluscenter.com/item.asp?
        UID=2007022820424970&catname=electric&item=10-2326
        >
        > B. Can anyone tell me the standard taig motor weight/rotation?
        >
        > thanks
        > Greg
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • in2steam
        Allan I have 2 questions, what rpm is the motor rated for and what is the maxuium you can get it to spin no load hooked up to the lathe (best geuss) BTW those
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 3, 2007
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          Allan I have 2 questions, what rpm is the motor rated for and what is
          the maxuium you can get it to spin no load hooked up to the lathe
          (best geuss)
          BTW those lesson controllers are designed for allot more, I helped
          test that batch pre production, the heat sink is reuired if you run
          cont. duty.


          chris

          --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "awolff612000" <awemail@...> wrote:
          >
          > Greg,
          > I do not have any experience with that particular motor, but
          > based on a similar one, it should work fine depending on your
          > needs . Here are some random comments.
          > You will need to come up with a method of belting the motor to the
          > lathe. You might get lucky and be able to use the pulley built
          into
          > the flywheel.
          > The included flywheel may be a nice feature, but I have found that
          > mine works fine without one.
          > The motor is rated at 3/4 HP at 130 VDC. Most controllers you will
          > find use SCR control. SCR works fine, but if you are using 120 VAC
          > to power the controller, the highest voltage obtainable is about 95
          > VDC. At 95 volts, you will not get 3/4 HP from the motor, probably
          > closer to 1/2 HP or less. That is still a lot of power for a lathe
          > the size of the Taig. However, there may be times when you want to
          > run the lathe at very slow speed, say 100 RPM or less. Usually
          > these low speeds are needed for larger diameter work. It takes a
          lot
          > of torque to keep the lathe turning when you start cutting larger
          > diameter pieces. Most SCR controllers have regulation adjustments
          > that apply more power to the motor when the load increases to keep
          > the speed constant. This helps, but if the motor does not have the
          > torque, you can still stall the lathe at low speeds.
          > I have heard that PWM controllers provide more low end torque and
          > generate less noise from the motor. PWM controllers are harder to
          > find and generally cost more. I use an SCR controller and like it
          > just fine.
          > The permanent magnet motors will make more noise than a single
          speed
          > AC motor no matter what type of controller you use. I do not find
          > it objectionable, but others might.
          >
          > I will share my configuration. Perhaps this will provide
          additional
          > insight. I purchased a 2.5 HP motor from Surplus Center, item # 10-
          > 1783. Note that it is rated at 1.5 HP at 95 volts. I picked up a
          > Leason 174308 SCR controller on eBay for about $60. This
          particular
          > controller is rated up to 1/2 HP without a heat sink and up to 1 HP
          > if a supplmental heat sink is used. I do not use the extra
          heatsink
          > and the unit still remains cool to the touch. The controller also
          > has a current limit adjustment, so I think I am pretty safe as is.
          > There are always plenty of controllers available, but keep in mind
          > that many of those are only the control module. That is OK if you
          > want to build a custom enclosure, but requires more work to put it
          > in a box and wire it up. I use the same width 3M polyflex belt
          that
          > Taig recommends. I may increase the width to a 5M someday. I
          > reduce the speed of the motor approximately 2.5:1 through the drive
          > pulleys. I'm not sure what the top end speed is, but it goes
          faster
          > than I ever need. Usable low end speed is probably 20 RPM. The
          > belt will slip before the motor stalls, although you can hear the
          > motor growl on heavier cuts. I put an external fan on the motor
          > drive shaft, but probably did not need to. The motor runs very
          cool.
          > Installing a variable speed DC motor on my Taig has been the best
          > upgrade by far. You will not regret it.
          > Good luck,
          > Allan
          >
          >
          > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Greg McFadden"
          > <greg.mcfadden@> wrote:
          > >
          > > couple of questions.
          > >
          > > A. I found this DC motor and I was thinking that it might work
          > quite nicely
          > > for the taig,... first off, any thoughts and secondly, if
          > feasible, can
          > > anyone recommend a dc motor controller for it?
          > >
          > > http://www.surpluscenter.com/item.asp?
          > UID=2007022820424970&catname=electric&item=10-2326
          > >
          > > B. Can anyone tell me the standard taig motor weight/rotation?
          > >
          > > thanks
          > > Greg
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
        • awolff612000
          Chris, The motor is rated at 6750 rpm. I do not have a means to measure the speed, but I would guess it is running close to that at no load. I have a 1-inch
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 3, 2007
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            Chris,
            The motor is rated at 6750 rpm. I do not have a means to measure
            the speed, but I would guess it is running close to that at no load. I
            have a 1-inch pulley on the motor and a 2.5 inch pulley on the head
            stock. That should give a maximum speed at the lathe of 2700 rpm, but
            it sure looks faster than that. Some day I will get a tach or stobe
            and find out for sure.
            The 3M size belt will slip before the motor stalls, so this acts
            like a safety relief to keep from tearing things up.
            Thanks for the info on the controller. I usually never run the
            lathe for more than 5-10 minutes at a time and usually at a very light
            load. The motor and controller barely rise in temperature, even under
            the heaviest loads I have subjected them to and at 90+ degee ambient
            temperatures.

            --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "in2steam" <in2steam@...> wrote:
            >
            > Allan I have 2 questions, what rpm is the motor rated for and what is
            > the maxuium you can get it to spin no load hooked up to the lathe
            > (best geuss)
            > BTW those lesson controllers are designed for allot more, I helped
            > test that batch pre production, the heat sink is reuired if you run
            > cont. duty.
            >
            >
            > chris
            >
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