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Re: Rotary Table Furniture

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  • underdog02817
    I have one but cannot comment as of yet(just got it). I am in the process of moving the mill building an enclosure and resetting up the mill(trmming it in very
    Message 1 of 29 , Nov 3, 2006
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      I have one but cannot comment as of yet(just got it). I am in the
      process of moving the mill building an enclosure and resetting up
      the mill(trmming it in very well this time).Then building the proper
      mounting hardware to get it attached to the mill. I will try it out
      when finished and let you know. My plans are to do 3-D contouring
      with it and use it as an all in one fixture plate for flip milling
      and such. I do jewelry and collectable/giftware types of projects.
      So my parts are of a "from scratch" and not so much mods on existing
      parts.


      --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Vlad Krupin" <vlad.cnc@...> wrote:
      >
      > On 11/2/06, benedict-list@... <benedict-list@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Here's a whole mess of questions:
      > >
      > > Who's got a rotary table, and what do you use it for?
      >
      >
      > I don't have one, but I want one to cut sides of taig blank arbors
      for the
      > 7/8" spanner. It's too tedious otherwise.
      >
      > --
      > Vlad's shop
      > http://www.krupin.net/serendipity/index.php?/categories/2-
      metalworking
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • benedict-list@hawaii.rr.com
      So far I haven t swapped out anything, fuse or otherwise. So I still just have a blown fuse. Unfortunately I don t have the original since I blew it a while
      Message 2 of 29 , Nov 3, 2006
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        So far I haven't swapped out anything, fuse or otherwise. So I still just
        have a blown fuse. Unfortunately I don't have the original since I blew
        it a while back.

        Before switching out anything for a different rating, I'm planning on
        calling Taig just to make sure. No worries.

        Vlad, it's a single fuse for all axes kind of thing. The fuse is in an
        inline fuse holder just off the power supply. The caps it comes off of
        are mighty big already (it's been over a year since I popped the hood, so
        to speak, so I don't know the actual rating, but they're each a pretty
        good handful.)

        Not sure about the specs on the fuse. It's running the same rating as
        before, though, so it should match whatever the folks at Taig installed
        before it went out the door.

        A while back there was a thread on how fast you can push a Taig, and I
        remember someone told Forrest they were running 60 ipm rapids, and he did
        a double-take. My guess is the answer to my blown fuse problem is to slow
        down, which I already have.

        My schedule has been a little unkind lately, and I haven't been out in the
        shop nearly as much as I'd like. With any luck I can get out this
        weekend, swap out the fuse, and actually try some of the advice I've been
        given.

        Thanks to everyone who's responded.

        Tom

        On Thu, 2 Nov 2006, Vlad Krupin wrote:

        > On 11/2/06, whatsit_stick <chuckels@...> wrote:
        > [snip]
        >
        >> DO NOT change the fuse type unless your willing to smoke your drivers
        >> that fast acting fuse is ment to react before the electronics get
        >> damaged. slow blow will not protect them!! slow blow fuses are used
        >> primerally on ac motor circuits where the starting current is many
        >> times higher than running current. they should never be used to protect
        >> electronic circuit. chuck
        >
        > Well, these are fairly special electronic circuits. Many PWM controllers
        > can tolerate an occasional current spike very nicely, and, in fact are
        > designed for that, so a slow blow fuse may be quite appropriate. It
        > really depends on the controller. A alternate solution to the problem
        > could be as simple as placing a bigger capacitor between the fuse and
        > the board. That should take care of the times when the board may want to
        > draw too much current for the fuse's liking for a brief period. Of
        > course, moderation is required - if you put too big of a capacitor
        > you'll blow the same fuse when you power up your equipment, not to
        > mention that your fuse won't offer as much protection as you'd expect.
        >
        > One more thing to consider: Do you have one fuse for everything, or a
        > fuse per axis? I'd say a fuse per axis is more appropriate in this
        > setup, because we are really trying to protect the controllers, not the
        > power supply. Most power supplies won't mind supplying excess current
        > for a while -- all that will happen is your voltage will sag. If you
        > have one big fuse, it won't protect individual board from overcurrent,
        > and yet can blow when all boards are running together and are drawing a
        > large but reasonable amount of current. Of course, you could have a fuse
        > per axis plus a big extra fuse to protect the power supply, if you
        > really wanted.
        >
        > Last, but not least, are you fuses are properly sized?
        >
        > Lastly, a small disclaimer. Things of electrical nature are not my area
        > of expertise, so take them with a good grain of salt. I describe things
        > the way I understand them to work, so if you follow my advice, and it
        > blows your house apart... sorry!.. :)
        >
        > Vlad
        >
        > --
        > Vlad's shop
        > http://www.krupin.net/serendipity/index.php?/categories/2-metalworking
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
      • Vlad Krupin
        ... That makes sense. I take it that the capacitors are on the power supply side of the fuse, not on the driver board side, right? All they do is smooth out
        Message 3 of 29 , Nov 3, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          On 11/3/06, benedict-list@... <benedict-list@...> wrote:
          >
          > So far I haven't swapped out anything, fuse or otherwise. So I still just
          > have a blown fuse. Unfortunately I don't have the original since I blew
          > it a while back.
          >
          > Before switching out anything for a different rating, I'm planning on
          > calling Taig just to make sure. No worries.
          >
          > Vlad, it's a single fuse for all axes kind of thing. The fuse is in an
          > inline fuse holder just off the power supply. The caps it comes off of
          > are mighty big already (it's been over a year since I popped the hood, so
          > to speak, so I don't know the actual rating, but they're each a pretty
          > good handful.)


          That makes sense. I take it that the capacitors are on the power supply side
          of the fuse, not on the driver board side, right? All they do is smooth out
          the voltage coming off your power supply. So if your driver boards decide to
          work hard (especially if you run all 4 of them) and draw a bunch of current
          (each within their respective limits), there will be a lot of current
          flowing out of your power supply, including those big capacitors, through
          the fuse and into your driver boards. Pop! There goes the fuse.

          Not sure about the specs on the fuse. It's running the same rating as
          > before, though, so it should match whatever the folks at Taig installed
          > before it went out the door.


          aha - factory installed. I have no idea what they have in there... I would
          be curious though, so if somebody knows what taig has 'under the hood',
          please do share.

          A while back there was a thread on how fast you can push a Taig, and I
          > remember someone told Forrest they were running 60 ipm rapids, and he did
          > a double-take. My guess is the answer to my blown fuse problem is to slow
          > down, which I already have.


          I think that might've been me :) I have mine set to 60 IPM rapids, except
          for Z axis, where 60IPM is too scary. But I don't use the "stock" taig
          controller either, so this would be comparing apples to oranges.

          My schedule has been a little unkind lately, and I haven't been out in the
          > shop nearly as much as I'd like. With any luck I can get out this
          > weekend, swap out the fuse, and actually try some of the advice I've been
          > given.
          >
          > Thanks to everyone who's responded.
          >
          > Tom
          >
          > On Thu, 2 Nov 2006, Vlad Krupin wrote:
          >
          > > On 11/2/06, whatsit_stick <chuckels@...> wrote:
          > > [snip]
          > >
          > >> DO NOT change the fuse type unless your willing to smoke your drivers
          > >> that fast acting fuse is ment to react before the electronics get
          > >> damaged. slow blow will not protect them!! slow blow fuses are used
          > >> primerally on ac motor circuits where the starting current is many
          > >> times higher than running current. they should never be used to protect
          > >> electronic circuit. chuck
          > >
          > > Well, these are fairly special electronic circuits. Many PWM controllers
          > > can tolerate an occasional current spike very nicely, and, in fact are
          > > designed for that, so a slow blow fuse may be quite appropriate. It
          > > really depends on the controller. A alternate solution to the problem
          > > could be as simple as placing a bigger capacitor between the fuse and
          > > the board. That should take care of the times when the board may want to
          > > draw too much current for the fuse's liking for a brief period. Of
          > > course, moderation is required - if you put too big of a capacitor
          > > you'll blow the same fuse when you power up your equipment, not to
          > > mention that your fuse won't offer as much protection as you'd expect.
          > >
          > > One more thing to consider: Do you have one fuse for everything, or a
          > > fuse per axis? I'd say a fuse per axis is more appropriate in this
          > > setup, because we are really trying to protect the controllers, not the
          > > power supply. Most power supplies won't mind supplying excess current
          > > for a while -- all that will happen is your voltage will sag. If you
          > > have one big fuse, it won't protect individual board from overcurrent,
          > > and yet can blow when all boards are running together and are drawing a
          > > large but reasonable amount of current. Of course, you could have a fuse
          > > per axis plus a big extra fuse to protect the power supply, if you
          > > really wanted.
          > >
          > > Last, but not least, are you fuses are properly sized?
          > >
          > > Lastly, a small disclaimer. Things of electrical nature are not my area
          > > of expertise, so take them with a good grain of salt. I describe things
          > > the way I understand them to work, so if you follow my advice, and it
          > > blows your house apart... sorry!.. :)
          > >
          > > Vlad
          > >
          > > --
          > > Vlad's shop
          > > http://www.krupin.net/serendipity/index.php?/categories/2-metalworking
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@...
          >
          > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-unsubscribe@...
          >
          >
          >
          > Let the chips fly!
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >


          --
          Vlad's shop
          http://www.krupin.net/serendipity/index.php?/categories/2-metalworking


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • John Trevick
          ... 60IPM? Technology keeps passing us by. Jon Elson of Pico-Systems setup a Taig about a year ago which he claims was able to run 120IPM.
          Message 4 of 29 , Nov 4, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            At 01:42 PM 11/3/2006, benedict-list@... wrote:

            >A while back there was a thread on how fast you can push a Taig, and I
            >remember someone told Forrest they were running 60 ipm rapids, and he did
            >a double-take. My guess is the answer to my blown fuse problem is to slow
            >down, which I already have.

            60IPM? Technology keeps passing us by. Jon Elson of Pico-Systems setup a
            Taig about a year ago which he claims was able to run
            120IPM. http://www.pico-systems.com/smallpwm.html He should probably
            include an extra set of lead screws and nuts in the package. Nice drive.



            - John
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