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tooling websites down?

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  • Vlad Krupin
    argh... it happened again... I plugged all the numbers into the mill speeds and feeds spreadsheet, and found out that a 4-flute 1/8 endmill cutting aluminum
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 2 9:35 PM
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      argh... it happened again... I plugged all the numbers into the 'mill speeds
      and feeds' spreadsheet, and found out that a 4-flute 1/8" endmill cutting
      aluminum should be used at 10500 RPM 21 IPM. Hmmm... 21 IPM is quite fast,
      but spreadsheets don't lie, do they? So, I plugged the numbers in, generated
      g-code, started cutting... Since I need to cut some deep slots, and 21IPM
      still sounds kind of fast to me, I am standing by with a can of WD-40 to
      make sure chips don't weld to the toolbit - it has happened before.

      The job starts with some intricate moves, so linear speeds aren't high, and
      everything works alright. About 5 minutes into the sequence we get to the
      first long arc... 21 IPM... Half-way through the arc - SNAP! There goes
      another 1/8" endmill. My last 1/8" endmill!

      Oh, well... time to stock up on some milling bits. So I go to ENCO
      website... it's temporarily unavailable. MSC Direct? Unavailable as well. In
      fact the message is almost a verbatim copy of enco's (are they one and the
      same company? Their websites, at least the wording and layout of the
      'unavaliable' sure look almost identical). So, in desperation I checked
      taig's website -- I thought they carried small endmills too at one point in
      time. Guess what? It's also down! Are there any other suppliers out there
      that have a working website so a man can get a 1/8" replacement end mill in
      a pinch? I've had a rather bad luck getting them off ebay, so I am not sure
      whether it is worth the money to even try.

      Thanks!

      Vlad

      P.S. BTW -- if anybody has an idea why my 1/8" bits snap so easily, please
      do share. I know part of the problem is flutes jamming with aluminum chips,
      but a bit of WD40 usually fixes that problem. Bigger endmills do not snap
      although sometimes I have to take things slower to avoid vibration. Smaller
      ones seem to work fine as well. 2-flute endmills seem to survive. 1/8"
      4-flute endmills just keep on snapping...





      --
      Vlad's shop
      http://www.krupin.net/serendipity/index.php?/categories/2-metalworking


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • haroldgfvanbeek
      ... the mill speeds ... cutting ... quite fast, ... generated ... and 21IPM ... 40 to ... high, and ... to the ... There goes ... as well. In ... and the ...
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 2 9:41 PM
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        --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Vlad Krupin" <vlad.cnc@...> wrote:
        >
        > argh... it happened again... I plugged all the numbers into
        the 'mill speeds
        > and feeds' spreadsheet, and found out that a 4-flute 1/8" endmill
        cutting
        > aluminum should be used at 10500 RPM 21 IPM. Hmmm... 21 IPM is
        quite fast,
        > but spreadsheets don't lie, do they? So, I plugged the numbers in,
        generated
        > g-code, started cutting... Since I need to cut some deep slots,
        and 21IPM
        > still sounds kind of fast to me, I am standing by with a can of WD-
        40 to
        > make sure chips don't weld to the toolbit - it has happened before.
        >
        > The job starts with some intricate moves, so linear speeds aren't
        high, and
        > everything works alright. About 5 minutes into the sequence we get
        to the
        > first long arc... 21 IPM... Half-way through the arc - SNAP!
        There goes
        > another 1/8" endmill. My last 1/8" endmill!
        >
        > Oh, well... time to stock up on some milling bits. So I go to ENCO
        > website... it's temporarily unavailable. MSC Direct? Unavailable
        as well. In
        > fact the message is almost a verbatim copy of enco's (are they one
        and the
        > same company? Their websites, at least the wording and layout of
        the
        > 'unavaliable' sure look almost identical). So, in desperation I
        checked
        > taig's website -- I thought they carried small endmills too at one
        point in
        > time. Guess what? It's also down! Are there any other suppliers
        out there
        > that have a working website so a man can get a 1/8" replacement
        end mill in
        > a pinch? I've had a rather bad luck getting them off ebay, so I am
        not sure
        > whether it is worth the money to even try.
        >
        > Thanks!
        >
        > Vlad
        >
        > P.S. BTW -- if anybody has an idea why my 1/8" bits snap so
        easily, please
        > do share. I know part of the problem is flutes jamming with
        aluminum chips,
        > but a bit of WD40 usually fixes that problem. Bigger endmills do
        not snap
        > although sometimes I have to take things slower to avoid
        vibration. Smaller
        > ones seem to work fine as well. 2-flute endmills seem to survive.
        1/8"
        > 4-flute endmills just keep on snapping...
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > Vlad's shop
        > http://www.krupin.net/serendipity/index.php?/categories/2-
        metalworking
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        Hi Vlad,

        Try http://www.bitsbits.net
        They carry a lot of endmills and bits

        GreetZ,

        Harold
      • Rich Crook
        ... 4-flute endmills just don t have as much space between flutes for the chips, especially in smaller sizes... For aluminum, I d stick to 2-flute HSS mills &
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 2 10:35 PM
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          >argh... it happened again... I plugged all the numbers into the 'mill speeds
          >and feeds' spreadsheet, and found out that a 4-flute 1/8" endmill cutting
          >aluminum should be used at 10500 RPM 21 IPM. Hmmm... 21 IPM is quite fast,
          >but spreadsheets don't lie, do they? So, I plugged the numbers in, generated
          >g-code, started cutting... Since I need to cut some deep slots, and 21IPM
          >still sounds kind of fast to me, I am standing by with a can of WD-40 to
          >make sure chips don't weld to the toolbit - it has happened before.

          >P.S. BTW -- if anybody has an idea why my 1/8" bits snap so easily, please
          >do share. I know part of the problem is flutes jamming with aluminum chips,
          >but a bit of WD40 usually fixes that problem. Bigger endmills do not snap
          >although sometimes I have to take things slower to avoid vibration. Smaller
          >ones seem to work fine as well. 2-flute endmills seem to survive. 1/8"
          >4-flute endmills just keep on snapping...

          4-flute endmills just don't have as much space between flutes for the
          chips, especially in smaller sizes...
          For aluminum, I'd stick to 2-flute HSS mills & use the 4-flute
          cutters only for light finishing cuts.
          Speed and feed charts don't compensate for smaller cutters being
          weaker... they're simply surface speed & chip thickness calculations.

          = Rich =
        • Paul Huffman
          Well, I don t have a Taig yet, but I do use 1/8 carbide bits in aluminum regularly. My top rpm is only 3000, and I run them at about 10 ipm at .1 depth of
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 5 4:58 PM
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            Well, I don't have a Taig yet, but I do use 1/8" carbide bits in
            aluminum regularly. My top rpm is only 3000, and I run them at about 10
            ipm at .1 depth of cut. I use a mist system to blow the chips out. I
            find that if I keep the cut clean that way I have no problems.
            HTH
            Paul in OKC
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