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Re: [taigtools] Re: Taig Milling Video

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  • Peter Homann
    Hi Andy, Just remember that Solid State relays are for switching AC only. Not DC. Cheers, Peter.
    Message 1 of 19 , Aug 3, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Andy,

      Just remember that Solid State relays are for switching AC only. Not DC.

      Cheers,

      Peter.

      warpedmephisto1 wrote:
      > Ok, you talked me into it. Relays are on the way to me. After
      > playing around a bit with TurboCNC and configuring the I/O ports I got
      > the I/O port on the MPS control box to work for spindle on/off and
      > coolant on/off. Now just building a simple relay box and I'll have
      > automatic coolant and spindle control! I'm also going to wire in some
      > other goodies to my master control box (not the MPS controller) like
      > manual override. Also going to encorporate my DC motor control, power
      > supplies, motor speed control knob, various on/offs and spindle RPM
      > display (if I can find one easily enough) into the master control box.
      > Definitely have to take pics of it after that!
      >
      > The relays I ended up buying were Crouzet 84060001 Solid State Relays
      > W/Status Lite, 2 for $10 and the guy was local to boot! Who said this
      > hobby had to expensive? :-)
      >
      > -Andy
      >
      > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "jkeyser14" <jkeyser14@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> It's really easy to add a relay for spindle and coolant if you have a
      >> breakout board. I bought industrial relays that are extremely nice
      >> (overkill) because I used to use them at work and got a great price on
      >> them (free).
      >>
      >> What I'm using are RIBU1S relays (Relay in a Box, Model U1S), and they
      >> have a hand/off/auto switch. That way you can turn the coolant and
      >> spindle on by flipping a switch on the relay, or by using software to
      >> send the relay a signal.
      >>
      >> The bad part is that I believe retail on them is $40. However,
      >> they'll even work on 240v high amperage applications if you ever
      >> upgrade to a larger mill.
      >>
      >> John
      >> http://www.EngineeringHobbyist.com
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, benedict-list@ wrote:
      >> >
      >> > On Thu, 3 Aug 2006, warpedmephisto1 wrote:
      >> >
      >> > > Thanks for the links and information. I have seen the QC
      > toolchanger
      >> > > before and thought about it, but there's a few things I'm still
      >> hesitant
      >> > > about - one being the legnth from the bottom spindle bearing to
      >> the tool
      >> > > tip increases, still using a proprietary arbor (and no full range
      >> > > collets) and it wouldn't fit onto my ER-16 spindle. I have been
      >> looking
      >> > > for a solution for quick tool changing for the ER-16 and about the
      >> only
      >> > > thing I can come up with is a depth stop for the spindle like Nick
      >> > > Carter did here: http://www.cartertools.com/erss.html
      >> >
      >> > The Mini Tool Changer from Joe Vicars can be adapted to ER-16.
      >> That's one
      >> > discussion that's been tossed around on the mini tool changer Yahoo
      >> list.
      >> > Not turnkey by any stretch, but it'd make for very short
      >> toolholders, easy
      >> > repeatability, and you could have a six tool turret controlled from
      >> either
      >> > Mach 3 or TurboCNC. (I haven't built mine yet, so assume there's a
      >> lot of
      >> > hand-waving going on as I write this.)
      >> >
      >> > > I haven't switched over to Mach software yet, but its on the
      > list of
      >> > > upgrades. So far I've been very pleased with TurboCNC and
      > really the
      >> > > only reason why I would want to change is because of the constant
      >> > > velocity/acceleration issues that plague TurboCNC. I haven't
      >> looked in
      >> > > depth at the automatic relay controls, but would eventually like
      >> to have
      >> > > coolant and the spindle on/off and RPM controlled by the program
      >> as well
      >> > > as controlled "manually" by toggle switches and a knob mounted in a
      >> > > controller box next to the computer. Its all on the "to do"
      > list. :-)
      >> >
      >> > Take a look at the relay box article on Nick Carter's web site
      >> > http://www.cartertools.com It's a construction article for
      > building a
      >> > two-relay box for handling spindle and coolant. FWIW the relays I'm
      >> using
      >> > in mine are big enough to turn a Bridgeport on and off. Overkill,
      >> but I
      >> > like overkill.
      >> >
      >> > > Another thing I've seen that sparks my interest is this:
      >> > > http://microproto.com/Control%20Module.htm That way I could
      >> control my
      >> > > Coolant and spindle using existing hardware that I already have.
      >> Or is
      >> > > that option only available with the newer (DSLS equipped)
      >> controllers?
      >> > > I do have an I/O port on the back of my MPS HD/LE controller box.
      >> >
      >> > Ooh! I hadn't seen that until now. Cool!
      >> >
      >> > Tom
      >> >
      >> > > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Homann" <groups@> wrote:
      >> > >>
      >> > >> Hi,
      >> > >>
      >> > >> Nice Setup and Video.
      >> > >>
      >> > >> If you are doing this to make money, a couple of things.
      >> > >>
      >> > >> 1. Have a look at the QC toolchanger from HighTechSystems. It will
      >> > > improve
      >> > >> your tool changing dramatically.
      >> > >> http://www.hightechsystemsllc.com/index_files/Page837.htm
      >> > >>
      >> > >> 2. When you get your variable DC motor. Have a look at the
      >> > > DigiSpeed-XL I
      >> > >> sell. http://www.homanndesigns.com/DigiSpeedXLDeal.html It will
      >> > > allow you
      >> > >> to change speeds if you are using Mach3 software (As you
      > should) :-)
      >> > >> http://www.artofcnc.ca
      >> > >>
      >> > >> 3. Also get a solenoid to control your coolant. You could upgrade
      >> your
      >> > >> MPS2000 controller with a Turbotaig to control the solenoid. :-)
      >> > >>
      >> > >> Cheers,
      >> > >>
      >> > >> Peter.
      >> > >>
      >> > >>
      >> > >>
      >> > >>
      >> > >> warpedmephisto1 wrote:
      >> > >>> Hi all,
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>> This is my first post to the forum. This is some of the typical
      >> work
      >> > >>> that I do with my Taig CNC mill. I work on a lot of paintball
      >> markers
      >> > >>> and upgrade them. This particular machining operation is to
      >> retrofit a
      >> > >>> certain paintball marker (Angel LCD) to allow wires to be
      > routed on
      >> > >>> the underside of the marker and up to the breech area. These wires
      >> > >>> carry the signal for infrared LED's that are mounted on opposite
      >> sides
      >> > >>> of the breech that tell the circuit board when there is a ball
      >> in the
      >> > >>> breech (OK to fire) and when there is not (not OK to fire). Just
      >> > >>> thought you all wouldn't mind seeing a video of this operation.
      >> > >>> There's still 2 more operations to go (left and right side of
      > body)
      >> > >>> and the grip frame gets a little bit of milling as well. Enjoy
      >> and let
      >> > >>> me know what you think!
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>> http://media.putfile.com/Angel-LCD-Milling
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>> To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>> To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-unsubscribe@
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>> Let the chips fly!
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>>
      >> > >>
      >> > >
      >> > >
      >> > >
      >> > >
      >> > >
      >> > >
      >> >
      >>
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@...
      >
      > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-unsubscribe@...
      >
      >
      >
      > Let the chips fly!
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Jim
      Hey Peter, It seems that there are now a few companies that make DC solid state relays. Checkout Opto-22, Crydom, Omron, etc... A quick google search for DC
      Message 2 of 19 , Aug 3, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Hey Peter, It seems that there are now a few companies that make DC
        solid state relays. Checkout Opto-22, Crydom, Omron, etc... A
        quick google search for DC solid state relays will fill the screen
        up. I've used several of the opto-22 components at my previous job
        for controlling 24V DC solenoid valves and they work very well. TTL
        input levels and 60V @ 5 amp control outputs. Not too bad and not
        to expensive either.

        Anyway, just for what its worth...

        Jim

        --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Homann" <groups@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Andy,
        >
        > Just remember that Solid State relays are for switching AC only.
        Not DC.
        >
        > Cheers,
        >
        > Peter.
        >
        > warpedmephisto1 wrote:
        > > Ok, you talked me into it. Relays are on the way to me. After
        > > playing around a bit with TurboCNC and configuring the I/O ports
        I got
        > > the I/O port on the MPS control box to work for spindle on/off
        and
        > > coolant on/off. Now just building a simple relay box and I'll
        have
        > > automatic coolant and spindle control! I'm also going to wire
        in some
        > > other goodies to my master control box (not the MPS controller)
        like
        > > manual override. Also going to encorporate my DC motor control,
        power
        > > supplies, motor speed control knob, various on/offs and spindle
        RPM
        > > display (if I can find one easily enough) into the master
        control box.
        > > Definitely have to take pics of it after that!
        > >
        > > The relays I ended up buying were Crouzet 84060001 Solid State
        Relays
        > > W/Status Lite, 2 for $10 and the guy was local to boot! Who
        said this
        > > hobby had to expensive? :-)
        > >
        > > -Andy
        > >
        > > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "jkeyser14" <jkeyser14@> wrote:
        > >>
        > >> It's really easy to add a relay for spindle and coolant if you
        have a
        > >> breakout board. I bought industrial relays that are extremely
        nice
        > >> (overkill) because I used to use them at work and got a great
        price on
        > >> them (free).
        > >>
        > >> What I'm using are RIBU1S relays (Relay in a Box, Model U1S),
        and they
        > >> have a hand/off/auto switch. That way you can turn the coolant
        and
        > >> spindle on by flipping a switch on the relay, or by using
        software to
        > >> send the relay a signal.
        > >>
        > >> The bad part is that I believe retail on them is $40. However,
        > >> they'll even work on 240v high amperage applications if you ever
        > >> upgrade to a larger mill.
        > >>
        > >> John
        > >> http://www.EngineeringHobbyist.com
        > >>
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, benedict-list@ wrote:
        > >> >
        > >> > On Thu, 3 Aug 2006, warpedmephisto1 wrote:
        > >> >
        > >> > > Thanks for the links and information. I have seen the QC
        > > toolchanger
        > >> > > before and thought about it, but there's a few things I'm
        still
        > >> hesitant
        > >> > > about - one being the legnth from the bottom spindle
        bearing to
        > >> the tool
        > >> > > tip increases, still using a proprietary arbor (and no full
        range
        > >> > > collets) and it wouldn't fit onto my ER-16 spindle. I have
        been
        > >> looking
        > >> > > for a solution for quick tool changing for the ER-16 and
        about the
        > >> only
        > >> > > thing I can come up with is a depth stop for the spindle
        like Nick
        > >> > > Carter did here: http://www.cartertools.com/erss.html
        > >> >
        > >> > The Mini Tool Changer from Joe Vicars can be adapted to ER-16.
        > >> That's one
        > >> > discussion that's been tossed around on the mini tool changer
        Yahoo
        > >> list.
        > >> > Not turnkey by any stretch, but it'd make for very short
        > >> toolholders, easy
        > >> > repeatability, and you could have a six tool turret
        controlled from
        > >> either
        > >> > Mach 3 or TurboCNC. (I haven't built mine yet, so assume
        there's a
        > >> lot of
        > >> > hand-waving going on as I write this.)
        > >> >
        > >> > > I haven't switched over to Mach software yet, but its on the
        > > list of
        > >> > > upgrades. So far I've been very pleased with TurboCNC and
        > > really the
        > >> > > only reason why I would want to change is because of the
        constant
        > >> > > velocity/acceleration issues that plague TurboCNC. I
        haven't
        > >> looked in
        > >> > > depth at the automatic relay controls, but would eventually
        like
        > >> to have
        > >> > > coolant and the spindle on/off and RPM controlled by the
        program
        > >> as well
        > >> > > as controlled "manually" by toggle switches and a knob
        mounted in a
        > >> > > controller box next to the computer. Its all on the "to do"
        > > list. :-)
        > >> >
        > >> > Take a look at the relay box article on Nick Carter's web site
        > >> > http://www.cartertools.com It's a construction article for
        > > building a
        > >> > two-relay box for handling spindle and coolant. FWIW the
        relays I'm
        > >> using
        > >> > in mine are big enough to turn a Bridgeport on and off.
        Overkill,
        > >> but I
        > >> > like overkill.
        > >> >
        > >> > > Another thing I've seen that sparks my interest is this:
        > >> > > http://microproto.com/Control%20Module.htm That way I could
        > >> control my
        > >> > > Coolant and spindle using existing hardware that I already
        have.
        > >> Or is
        > >> > > that option only available with the newer (DSLS equipped)
        > >> controllers?
        > >> > > I do have an I/O port on the back of my MPS HD/LE
        controller box.
        > >> >
        > >> > Ooh! I hadn't seen that until now. Cool!
        > >> >
        > >> > Tom
        > >> >
        > >> > > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Homann" <groups@>
        wrote:
        > >> > >>
        > >> > >> Hi,
        > >> > >>
        > >> > >> Nice Setup and Video.
        > >> > >>
        > >> > >> If you are doing this to make money, a couple of things.
        > >> > >>
        > >> > >> 1. Have a look at the QC toolchanger from HighTechSystems.
        It will
        > >> > > improve
        > >> > >> your tool changing dramatically.
        > >> > >> http://www.hightechsystemsllc.com/index_files/Page837.htm
        > >> > >>
        > >> > >> 2. When you get your variable DC motor. Have a look at the
        > >> > > DigiSpeed-XL I
        > >> > >> sell. http://www.homanndesigns.com/DigiSpeedXLDeal.html It
        will
        > >> > > allow you
        > >> > >> to change speeds if you are using Mach3 software (As you
        > > should) :-)
        > >> > >> http://www.artofcnc.ca
        > >> > >>
        > >> > >> 3. Also get a solenoid to control your coolant. You could
        upgrade
        > >> your
        > >> > >> MPS2000 controller with a Turbotaig to control the
        solenoid. :-)
        > >> > >>
        > >> > >> Cheers,
        > >> > >>
        > >> > >> Peter.
        > >> > >>
        > >> > >>
        > >> > >>
        > >> > >>
        > >> > >> warpedmephisto1 wrote:
        > >> > >>> Hi all,
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>> This is my first post to the forum. This is some of the
        typical
        > >> work
        > >> > >>> that I do with my Taig CNC mill. I work on a lot of
        paintball
        > >> markers
        > >> > >>> and upgrade them. This particular machining operation is
        to
        > >> retrofit a
        > >> > >>> certain paintball marker (Angel LCD) to allow wires to be
        > > routed on
        > >> > >>> the underside of the marker and up to the breech area.
        These wires
        > >> > >>> carry the signal for infrared LED's that are mounted on
        opposite
        > >> sides
        > >> > >>> of the breech that tell the circuit board when there is a
        ball
        > >> in the
        > >> > >>> breech (OK to fire) and when there is not (not OK to
        fire). Just
        > >> > >>> thought you all wouldn't mind seeing a video of this
        operation.
        > >> > >>> There's still 2 more operations to go (left and right
        side of
        > > body)
        > >> > >>> and the grip frame gets a little bit of milling as well.
        Enjoy
        > >> and let
        > >> > >>> me know what you think!
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>> http://media.putfile.com/Angel-LCD-Milling
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>> To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>> To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-
        unsubscribe@
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>> Let the chips fly!
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>>
        > >> > >>
        > >> > >
        > >> > >
        > >> > >
        > >> > >
        > >> > >
        > >> > >
        > >> >
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@...
        > >
        > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-
        unsubscribe@...
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Let the chips fly!
        > >
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
      • Peter Homann
        Hi Jim, Thanks for the reply. Yes I am aware of the DC types. It s just that most of the cheap SS Relays are for AC only. I should have been a bit clearer.
        Message 3 of 19 , Aug 4, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Jim,

          Thanks for the reply. Yes I am aware of the DC types. It's just that most
          of the cheap SS Relays are for AC only.

          I should have been a bit clearer.

          Cheers,

          Peter.

          Jim wrote:
          > Hey Peter, It seems that there are now a few companies that make DC
          > solid state relays. Checkout Opto-22, Crydom, Omron, etc... A
          > quick google search for DC solid state relays will fill the screen
          > up. I've used several of the opto-22 components at my previous job
          > for controlling 24V DC solenoid valves and they work very well. TTL
          > input levels and 60V @ 5 amp control outputs. Not too bad and not
          > to expensive either.
          >
          > Anyway, just for what its worth...
          >
          > Jim
          >
          > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Homann" <groups@...> wrote:
          >>
          >> Hi Andy,
          >>
          >> Just remember that Solid State relays are for switching AC only.
          > Not DC.
          >>
          >> Cheers,
          >>
          >> Peter.
          >>
          >> warpedmephisto1 wrote:
          >> > Ok, you talked me into it. Relays are on the way to me. After
          >> > playing around a bit with TurboCNC and configuring the I/O ports
          > I got
          >> > the I/O port on the MPS control box to work for spindle on/off
          > and
          >> > coolant on/off. Now just building a simple relay box and I'll
          > have
          >> > automatic coolant and spindle control! I'm also going to wire
          > in some
          >> > other goodies to my master control box (not the MPS controller)
          > like
          >> > manual override. Also going to encorporate my DC motor control,
          > power
          >> > supplies, motor speed control knob, various on/offs and spindle
          > RPM
          >> > display (if I can find one easily enough) into the master
          > control box.
          >> > Definitely have to take pics of it after that!
          >> >
          >> > The relays I ended up buying were Crouzet 84060001 Solid State
          > Relays
          >> > W/Status Lite, 2 for $10 and the guy was local to boot! Who
          > said this
          >> > hobby had to expensive? :-)
          >> >
          >> > -Andy
          >> >
          >> > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "jkeyser14" <jkeyser14@> wrote:
          >> >>
          >> >> It's really easy to add a relay for spindle and coolant if you
          > have a
          >> >> breakout board. I bought industrial relays that are extremely
          > nice
          >> >> (overkill) because I used to use them at work and got a great
          > price on
          >> >> them (free).
          >> >>
          >> >> What I'm using are RIBU1S relays (Relay in a Box, Model U1S),
          > and they
          >> >> have a hand/off/auto switch. That way you can turn the coolant
          > and
          >> >> spindle on by flipping a switch on the relay, or by using
          > software to
          >> >> send the relay a signal.
          >> >>
          >> >> The bad part is that I believe retail on them is $40. However,
          >> >> they'll even work on 240v high amperage applications if you ever
          >> >> upgrade to a larger mill.
          >> >>
          >> >> John
          >> >> http://www.EngineeringHobbyist.com
          >> >>
          >> >>
          >> >>
          >> >> --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, benedict-list@ wrote:
          >> >> >
          >> >> > On Thu, 3 Aug 2006, warpedmephisto1 wrote:
          >> >> >
          >> >> > > Thanks for the links and information. I have seen the QC
          >> > toolchanger
          >> >> > > before and thought about it, but there's a few things I'm
          > still
          >> >> hesitant
          >> >> > > about - one being the legnth from the bottom spindle
          > bearing to
          >> >> the tool
          >> >> > > tip increases, still using a proprietary arbor (and no full
          > range
          >> >> > > collets) and it wouldn't fit onto my ER-16 spindle. I have
          > been
          >> >> looking
          >> >> > > for a solution for quick tool changing for the ER-16 and
          > about the
          >> >> only
          >> >> > > thing I can come up with is a depth stop for the spindle
          > like Nick
          >> >> > > Carter did here: http://www.cartertools.com/erss.html
          >> >> >
          >> >> > The Mini Tool Changer from Joe Vicars can be adapted to ER-16.
          >> >> That's one
          >> >> > discussion that's been tossed around on the mini tool changer
          > Yahoo
          >> >> list.
          >> >> > Not turnkey by any stretch, but it'd make for very short
          >> >> toolholders, easy
          >> >> > repeatability, and you could have a six tool turret
          > controlled from
          >> >> either
          >> >> > Mach 3 or TurboCNC. (I haven't built mine yet, so assume
          > there's a
          >> >> lot of
          >> >> > hand-waving going on as I write this.)
          >> >> >
          >> >> > > I haven't switched over to Mach software yet, but its on the
          >> > list of
          >> >> > > upgrades. So far I've been very pleased with TurboCNC and
          >> > really the
          >> >> > > only reason why I would want to change is because of the
          > constant
          >> >> > > velocity/acceleration issues that plague TurboCNC. I
          > haven't
          >> >> looked in
          >> >> > > depth at the automatic relay controls, but would eventually
          > like
          >> >> to have
          >> >> > > coolant and the spindle on/off and RPM controlled by the
          > program
          >> >> as well
          >> >> > > as controlled "manually" by toggle switches and a knob
          > mounted in a
          >> >> > > controller box next to the computer. Its all on the "to do"
          >> > list. :-)
          >> >> >
          >> >> > Take a look at the relay box article on Nick Carter's web site
          >> >> > http://www.cartertools.com It's a construction article for
          >> > building a
          >> >> > two-relay box for handling spindle and coolant. FWIW the
          > relays I'm
          >> >> using
          >> >> > in mine are big enough to turn a Bridgeport on and off.
          > Overkill,
          >> >> but I
          >> >> > like overkill.
          >> >> >
          >> >> > > Another thing I've seen that sparks my interest is this:
          >> >> > > http://microproto.com/Control%20Module.htm That way I could
          >> >> control my
          >> >> > > Coolant and spindle using existing hardware that I already
          > have.
          >> >> Or is
          >> >> > > that option only available with the newer (DSLS equipped)
          >> >> controllers?
          >> >> > > I do have an I/O port on the back of my MPS HD/LE
          > controller box.
          >> >> >
          >> >> > Ooh! I hadn't seen that until now. Cool!
          >> >> >
          >> >> > Tom
          >> >> >
          >> >> > > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Homann" <groups@>
          > wrote:
          >> >> > >>
          >> >> > >> Hi,
          >> >> > >>
          >> >> > >> Nice Setup and Video.
          >> >> > >>
          >> >> > >> If you are doing this to make money, a couple of things.
          >> >> > >>
          >> >> > >> 1. Have a look at the QC toolchanger from HighTechSystems.
          > It will
          >> >> > > improve
          >> >> > >> your tool changing dramatically.
          >> >> > >> http://www.hightechsystemsllc.com/index_files/Page837.htm
          >> >> > >>
          >> >> > >> 2. When you get your variable DC motor. Have a look at the
          >> >> > > DigiSpeed-XL I
          >> >> > >> sell. http://www.homanndesigns.com/DigiSpeedXLDeal.html It
          > will
          >> >> > > allow you
          >> >> > >> to change speeds if you are using Mach3 software (As you
          >> > should) :-)
          >> >> > >> http://www.artofcnc.ca
          >> >> > >>
          >> >> > >> 3. Also get a solenoid to control your coolant. You could
          > upgrade
          >> >> your
          >> >> > >> MPS2000 controller with a Turbotaig to control the
          > solenoid. :-)
          >> >> > >>
          >> >> > >> Cheers,
          >> >> > >>
          >> >> > >> Peter.
          >> >> > >>
          >> >> > >>
          >> >> > >>
          >> >> > >>
          >> >> > >> warpedmephisto1 wrote:
          >> >> > >>> Hi all,
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>> This is my first post to the forum. This is some of the
          > typical
          >> >> work
          >> >> > >>> that I do with my Taig CNC mill. I work on a lot of
          > paintball
          >> >> markers
          >> >> > >>> and upgrade them. This particular machining operation is
          > to
          >> >> retrofit a
          >> >> > >>> certain paintball marker (Angel LCD) to allow wires to be
          >> > routed on
          >> >> > >>> the underside of the marker and up to the breech area.
          > These wires
          >> >> > >>> carry the signal for infrared LED's that are mounted on
          > opposite
          >> >> sides
          >> >> > >>> of the breech that tell the circuit board when there is a
          > ball
          >> >> in the
          >> >> > >>> breech (OK to fire) and when there is not (not OK to
          > fire). Just
          >> >> > >>> thought you all wouldn't mind seeing a video of this
          > operation.
          >> >> > >>> There's still 2 more operations to go (left and right
          > side of
          >> > body)
          >> >> > >>> and the grip frame gets a little bit of milling as well.
          > Enjoy
          >> >> and let
          >> >> > >>> me know what you think!
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>> http://media.putfile.com/Angel-LCD-Milling
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>> To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>> To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-
          > unsubscribe@
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>> Let the chips fly!
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>>
          >> >> > >>
          >> >> > >
          >> >> > >
          >> >> > >
          >> >> > >
          >> >> > >
          >> >> > >
          >> >> >
          >> >>
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >
          >> > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@...
          >> >
          >> > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-
          > unsubscribe@...
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >
          >> > Let the chips fly!
          >> >
          >> > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@...
          >
          > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-unsubscribe@...
          >
          >
          >
          > Let the chips fly!
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • nattyone960
          ... I use the QC and this is exactly my problem now that I am going to a 4th Axis. I wish it could be redesigned a lot more compact. It is really a useful
          Message 4 of 19 , Aug 4, 2006
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            --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "warpedmephisto1" <warped@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Peter,
            >
            > Thanks for the links and information. I have seen the QC toolchanger
            > before and thought about it, but there's a few things I'm still
            > hesitant about - one being the legnth from the bottom spindle bearing
            > to the tool tip increases,

            I use the QC and this is exactly my problem now that I am going to a
            4th Axis. I wish it could be redesigned a lot more compact. It is
            really a useful tool. I bought the other kind that was featured on
            Nicks Website but the setscrews are way too small and a note sent to
            the designer produced no results. I have never used them and they
            reduced the Z a lot as well.
          • Rich Crook
            ... A possible improvement in the tool stop: Make the 7/16-20 pulley bushing with a knurled flange so that the entire stop can be removed from the spindle
            Message 5 of 19 , Aug 4, 2006
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              At 10:06 AM 8/3/2006, you wrote:

              >Hi Peter,
              >
              >Thanks for the links and information. I have seen the QC toolchanger
              >before and thought about it, but there's a few things I'm still
              >hesitant about - one being the legnth from the bottom spindle bearing
              >to the tool tip increases, still using a proprietary arbor (and no
              >full range collets) and it wouldn't fit onto my ER-16 spindle. I have
              >been looking for a solution for quick tool changing for the ER-16 and
              >about the only thing I can come up with is a depth stop for the
              >spindle like Nick Carter did here:
              ><http://www.cartertools.com/erss.html>http://www.cartertools.com/erss.html

              A possible improvement in the tool stop:
              Make the 7/16-20 pulley bushing with a knurled flange so that the
              entire stop can be removed from the spindle after setting a tool.
              This way, the bit won't be magnetized & attract steel chips. (and it
              prevents balance/vibration issues at high speeds.)
              The flange allows for epeatable positioning.

              The bushing OD would have to be threaded normally with a die, then
              the die is turned around backwards to cut right up to the flange face.
              A shallow counter-bore (made with a 7/16" drill) in the end of the
              pulley would clear any partial threads that are left on the bushing.

              = Rich =

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Rich Crook
              ... I d think that would work with *any* MPS controller with the I/O socket. $100 seems a little pricey for a generic electrical box, 2 outlets, a pair of
              Message 6 of 19 , Aug 4, 2006
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                >Another thing I've seen that sparks my interest is this:
                ><http://microproto.com/Control%20Module.htm>http://microproto.com/Control%20Module.htm
                >That way I could control my
                >Coolant and spindle using existing hardware that I already have. Or
                >is that option only available with the newer (DSLS equipped)
                >controllers? I do have an I/O port on the back of my MPS HD/LE
                >controller box.

                I'd think that would work with *any* MPS controller with the I/O socket.
                $100 seems a little pricey for a generic electrical box, 2 outlets, a
                pair of solid-state relays, and a pair of cords.
                But then, it *is* painted to match the mill...

                = Rich =
                (Half the fun is making it yourself!)

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • warpedmephisto1
                Yeah, took some voltage measurements last night and OUT1 and OUT2 are live on the I/O port on the back of the controller. I ordered some relays and am pretty
                Message 7 of 19 , Aug 4, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  Yeah, took some voltage measurements last night and OUT1 and OUT2 are
                  live on the I/O port on the back of the controller. I ordered some
                  relays and am pretty soon going to have automatic spindle and coolant
                  on my Taig. Can't wait to see the machine make things spin and squirt
                  coolant all on its own! :-)

                  -Andy

                  --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, Rich Crook <richcrook9418@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > >Another thing I've seen that sparks my interest is this:
                  >
                  ><http://microproto.com/Control%20Module.htm>http://microproto.com/Control%20Module.htm

                  > >That way I could control my
                  > >Coolant and spindle using existing hardware that I already have. Or
                  > >is that option only available with the newer (DSLS equipped)
                  > >controllers? I do have an I/O port on the back of my MPS HD/LE
                  > >controller box.
                  >
                  > I'd think that would work with *any* MPS controller with the I/O socket.
                  > $100 seems a little pricey for a generic electrical box, 2 outlets, a
                  > pair of solid-state relays, and a pair of cords.
                  > But then, it *is* painted to match the mill...
                  >
                  > = Rich =
                  > (Half the fun is making it yourself!)
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
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