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Help with boring using an end mill

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  • Jim
    Hi all, I need some advise here. I m trying to bore a hole in a block of aluminum for a press fit bearing to fit into the end of it. I don t have a boring
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 1 12:00 AM
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      Hi all,

      I need some advise here. I'm trying to bore a hole in a block of
      aluminum for a press fit bearing to fit into the end of it. I don't
      have a boring head (yet - More shopping at LMS soon!) and thought I
      might be able to accomplish this using my CNC taig. The bearing is
      22mm dia. and about .275 inches thick. I will use a roughing end mill
      to get the hole "close" and then switch to a four flute 1/4" hss mill
      to finish it up. My questions are:

      What is the best direction for the finishing pass? A Climbing cut
      (table moving in a clockwise direction) or CCW?

      And, is it better to start with the mill up at the final diameter and
      work down on each pass, or start at depth and work outwards with each
      pass?

      There is already a 1/4 inch hole through the block so swarf buildup
      shouldn't be to much of a problem. BTW, CNC on this mill is amazing
      and I know I've only scratched the surface at what it can do.

      Thanks,
      Jim
    • Richard
      Use a tap properly positioned. Richard ... don t ... mill ... mill ... and ... each
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 1 4:11 AM
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        Use a tap properly positioned. Richard

        --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Jim" <samadams4q@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi all,
        >
        > I need some advise here. I'm trying to bore a hole in a block of
        > aluminum for a press fit bearing to fit into the end of it. I
        don't
        > have a boring head (yet - More shopping at LMS soon!) and thought I
        > might be able to accomplish this using my CNC taig. The bearing is
        > 22mm dia. and about .275 inches thick. I will use a roughing end
        mill
        > to get the hole "close" and then switch to a four flute 1/4" hss
        mill
        > to finish it up. My questions are:
        >
        > What is the best direction for the finishing pass? A Climbing cut
        > (table moving in a clockwise direction) or CCW?
        >
        > And, is it better to start with the mill up at the final diameter
        and
        > work down on each pass, or start at depth and work outwards with
        each
        > pass?
        >
        > There is already a 1/4 inch hole through the block so swarf buildup
        > shouldn't be to much of a problem. BTW, CNC on this mill is amazing
        > and I know I've only scratched the surface at what it can do.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Jim
        >
      • campgems
        Did you mean Reamer???? : ) Don ... of ... thought I ... is ... end ... cut ... diameter ... buildup ... amazing
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 1 8:48 AM
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          Did you mean Reamer???? :>)

          Don

          --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Richard" <phrh@...> wrote:
          >
          > Use a tap properly positioned. Richard
          >
          > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Jim" <samadams4q@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hi all,
          > >
          > > I need some advise here. I'm trying to bore a hole in a block
          of
          > > aluminum for a press fit bearing to fit into the end of it. I
          > don't
          > > have a boring head (yet - More shopping at LMS soon!) and
          thought I
          > > might be able to accomplish this using my CNC taig. The bearing
          is
          > > 22mm dia. and about .275 inches thick. I will use a roughing
          end
          > mill
          > > to get the hole "close" and then switch to a four flute 1/4" hss
          > mill
          > > to finish it up. My questions are:
          > >
          > > What is the best direction for the finishing pass? A Climbing
          cut
          > > (table moving in a clockwise direction) or CCW?
          > >
          > > And, is it better to start with the mill up at the final
          diameter
          > and
          > > work down on each pass, or start at depth and work outwards with
          > each
          > > pass?
          > >
          > > There is already a 1/4 inch hole through the block so swarf
          buildup
          > > shouldn't be to much of a problem. BTW, CNC on this mill is
          amazing
          > > and I know I've only scratched the surface at what it can do.
          > >
          > > Thanks,
          > > Jim
          > >
          >
        • campgems
          Jim, if the work is small enough, try using the mill like a lathe. There has been some talk about doing that on this list a while back. Chuck up the work on
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 1 8:58 AM
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            Jim, if the work is small enough, try using the mill like a lathe.
            There has been some talk about doing that on this list a while
            back. Chuck up the work on the spindle, mount a lathe bit on the
            bed and start cutting. Use the Y to set up the tool on the center
            line, and use the X as the cross feed, Z becomes travel. You are
            limited in size by what the chuck will handle and clearance to the
            column. Of course, this all assumes you have a Tage lathe for the
            chuck and tool post, etc.

            Don

            --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Jim" <samadams4q@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi all,
            >
            > I need some advise here. I'm trying to bore a hole in a block of
            > aluminum for a press fit bearing to fit into the end of it. I
            don't
            > have a boring head (yet - More shopping at LMS soon!) and thought
            I
            > might be able to accomplish this using my CNC taig. The bearing
            is
            > 22mm dia. and about .275 inches thick. I will use a roughing end
            mill
            > to get the hole "close" and then switch to a four flute 1/4" hss
            mill
            > to finish it up. My questions are:
            >
            > What is the best direction for the finishing pass? A Climbing cut
            > (table moving in a clockwise direction) or CCW?
            >
            > And, is it better to start with the mill up at the final diameter
            and
            > work down on each pass, or start at depth and work outwards with
            each
            > pass?
            >
            > There is already a 1/4 inch hole through the block so swarf
            buildup
            > shouldn't be to much of a problem. BTW, CNC on this mill is
            amazing
            > and I know I've only scratched the surface at what it can do.
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Jim
            >
          • Jim
            Thanks for the reply, Don. The block is too big to chuck or turn in any lathe I could fit in my shop. I recieved an e-mail from another member who suggested
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 1 10:25 PM
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              Thanks for the reply, Don. The block is too big to chuck or turn in
              any lathe I could fit in my shop. I recieved an e-mail from another
              member who suggested that a 1/2" two flute end mill was a better
              choice for the finish cut than the 1/4" one I mentioned. Also that
              I should start at full depth and use a climbing cut for the finish
              (last .005). I used a simple 1 line g02 code with the correct
              radius accounting for the tool width and it worked perfectly! The
              bore was as smooth as some I've cut on my lathe and the bearing was
              a very snug fit. I was afraid that the boring circle created by CNC
              wouldn't be as smooth as one created with a boring head, but I was
              way wrong. Every day I learn more!

              Jim

              --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "campgems" <Don@...> wrote:
              >
              > Jim, if the work is small enough, try using the mill like a
              lathe.
              > There has been some talk about doing that on this list a while
              > back. Chuck up the work on the spindle, mount a lathe bit on the
              > bed and start cutting. Use the Y to set up the tool on the center
              > line, and use the X as the cross feed, Z becomes travel. You are
              > limited in size by what the chuck will handle and clearance to the
              > column. Of course, this all assumes you have a Tage lathe for the
              > chuck and tool post, etc.
              >
              > Don
              >
              > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Jim" <samadams4q@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi all,
              > >
              > > I need some advise here. I'm trying to bore a hole in a block
              of
              > > aluminum for a press fit bearing to fit into the end of it. I
              > don't
              > > have a boring head (yet - More shopping at LMS soon!) and
              thought
              > I
              > > might be able to accomplish this using my CNC taig. The bearing
              > is
              > > 22mm dia. and about .275 inches thick. I will use a roughing
              end
              > mill
              > > to get the hole "close" and then switch to a four flute 1/4" hss
              > mill
              > > to finish it up. My questions are:
              > >
              > > What is the best direction for the finishing pass? A Climbing
              cut
              > > (table moving in a clockwise direction) or CCW?
              > >
              > > And, is it better to start with the mill up at the final
              diameter
              > and
              > > work down on each pass, or start at depth and work outwards with
              > each
              > > pass?
              > >
              > > There is already a 1/4 inch hole through the block so swarf
              > buildup
              > > shouldn't be to much of a problem. BTW, CNC on this mill is
              > amazing
              > > and I know I've only scratched the surface at what it can do.
              > >
              > > Thanks,
              > > Jim
              > >
              >
            • Richard
              No not a reamer! I often use a small tap as a boring bar. Just position it so that one of the cutting edges is centered to match the lathe centers and use it
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 2 3:34 AM
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                No not a reamer! I often use a small tap as a boring bar. Just
                position it so that one of the cutting edges is centered to match the
                lathe centers and use it like a boring tool. The tap teeth on one row
                work like a boring tool with lots of cutting teeth. Mount one in your
                tool holder and take a look and it should be obvious. Great for very
                small holes. Richard


                - In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "campgems" <Don@...> wrote:
                >
                > Did you mean Reamer???? :>)
                >
                > Don
                >
                > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Richard" <phrh@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Use a tap properly positioned. Richard
                > >
                > > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Jim" <samadams4q@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Hi all,
                > > >
                > > > I need some advise here. I'm trying to bore a hole in a block
                > of
                > > > aluminum for a press fit bearing to fit into the end of it. I
                > > don't
                > > > have a boring head
              • campgems
                I guess I was thinking of a typical bearing mount with a lip to prevent the bearing from pushing all the way through. Your approach for full bore though
                Message 7 of 8 , Aug 3 8:53 PM
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                  I guess I was thinking of a typical bearing mount with a lip to
                  prevent the bearing from pushing all the way through.

                  Your approach for full bore though deserves some though on my part.
                  Always a new, at least to me, way to do things. Thats the great
                  thing about this list.

                  Don
                  --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Richard" <phrh@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > No not a reamer! I often use a small tap as a boring bar. Just
                  > position it so that one of the cutting edges is centered to match
                  the
                  > lathe centers and use it like a boring tool. The tap teeth on one
                  row
                  > work like a boring tool with lots of cutting teeth. Mount one in
                  your
                  > tool holder and take a look and it should be obvious. Great for
                  very
                  > small holes. Richard
                  >
                  >
                  > - In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "campgems" <Don@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Did you mean Reamer???? :>)
                  > >
                  > > Don
                  > >
                  > > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Richard" <phrh@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Use a tap properly positioned. Richard
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Jim" <samadams4q@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Hi all,
                  > > > >
                  > > > > I need some advise here. I'm trying to bore a hole in a
                  block
                  > > of
                  > > > > aluminum for a press fit bearing to fit into the end of it.
                  I
                  > > > don't
                  > > > > have a boring head
                  >
                • Rich Crook
                  Hmm. This has got me thinking - I wonder if one could use a tap as a sort of roughing mill? When taps get dull, it s on the tapered end - the teeth further up
                  Message 8 of 8 , Aug 11 4:53 PM
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                    Hmm. This has got me thinking - I wonder if one could use a tap as a
                    sort of roughing mill?
                    When taps get dull, it's on the tapered end - the teeth further up
                    should still be sharp, so-ooo...
                    Why not grind off the (dull) tapered end & get more life out of it as
                    a roughing mill?
                    Ok, so it won't do plunge cuts, but that's generally not what
                    roughing mills are for, anyway.
                    Chip clearing & noise/vibration might be a problem with a
                    straight-flute tap, but a spiral flute should work pretty well.
                    Any adventurous types ever tried this?
                    (Just an idea.)

                    = Rich =

                    >No not a reamer! I often use a small tap as a boring bar. Just
                    >position it so that one of the cutting edges is centered to match the
                    >lathe centers and use it like a boring tool. The tap teeth on one row
                    >work like a boring tool with lots of cutting teeth. Mount one in your
                    >tool holder and take a look and it should be obvious. Great for very
                    >small holes. Richard
                    >
                    > >
                    > > Did you mean Reamer???? :>)
                    > >
                    > > Don
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