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Re: Anyone doing any small scale anodizing?

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  • b_delerious
    I think the problem may have been the temperature, the container was very warm/hot to the touch (guessing 100-120). I think its due to the fact that i was
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 2, 2006
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      I think the problem may have been the temperature, the container was
      very warm/hot to the touch (guessing 100-120). I think its due to the
      fact that i was using very small containers (ie the parts barely fit
      in). I'll make a bigger bath and try again.

      I've been using Sodium Hydroxide (lye/caustic) to clean the parts,
      though i've read that nitric acid is better,do you have any experience
      with those?

      Thanks for the input, ill post back with results.


      --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "jkeyser14" <jkeyser14@...> wrote:
      >
      > I've had fairly decent results.
      >
      > I use a 10% sulphuric acid concentration. First of all, make sure
      > your aluminum is VERY clean or you will get spotting. Keep the amps
      > per square inch at the recommended value (~13 amp hours per sq in).
      > Also, make sure that your parts have a good contact. If they are not
      > held extremely tight (IE you can wiggle them on your fixture), they
      > will not anodize because your fixture will ano first, killing all
      > electrical conductivity. The acid bath must stay between 65 and 75
      > deg Farenheit. Keep the dye bath between 130 and 145 deg F. Also, if
      > you aren't using a nickel acetate sealant, steaming is the best method
      > to seal the parts since it will leach less colors.
      >
      > Generally, it takes about an hour and a half in the acid bath for
      > smaller parts. Dye time depends on the color you are going for,
      > normally anywhere from 2 min to 5 min. Then I steam for at least as
      > long as the acid bath time.
      >
      > I've never used a car battery charger since you can't control
      > amperage, what my friend and I setup was a computer power supply
      > connected to a PWM controller. Not the best of methods, but it still
      > lets us ramp up to our desired amperage slowly (not ramping up can
      > cause your fixture to anodize prematurely, once again loosing contact).
      >
      > Since you are at a school, look for a book in your library called The
      > Canning Handbook on Electroplating. They've got a very good section
      > on anodizing (the might have spelled it anodising, they're Brittish).
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "b_delerious" <b_delerious@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi guys,
      > >
      > > I've looked over several anodizing recipes, and have tried a few out
      > > (I'm at a university so i have access to lots of equipment and
      > > chemicals!), but all i end up doing is eating away the aluminum, and
      > > the coating (if any) doesn't seem to be very hard at all (scratches
      > > off easily with another untreated aluminum chunk.
      > >
      > > I've been using permutations of these recipes (and a few more):
      > > http://www.warpig.com/paintball/technical/anodize.shtml
      > > http://www.artmetal.com/project/TOC/finishes/anodize.html
      > >
      > > Anyone having better luck/skill than me?
      > >
      > > -B
      > >
      >
    • jkeyser14
      I keep it at a constant 12V and adjust the ouput of the pwm to keep it at the proper amperage.
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 2, 2006
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        I keep it at a constant 12V and adjust the ouput of the pwm to keep it
        at the proper amperage.
      • jkeyser14
        For cleaning, first I soak in some aluminum cleaner/degreaser I bought from MSC (it specifies a 2 minute bath held at about 160 Farenheit). Then I clean w/
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 2, 2006
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          For cleaning, first I soak in some aluminum cleaner/degreaser I bought
          from MSC (it specifies a 2 minute bath held at about 160 Farenheit).
          Then I clean w/ soapy water, rinse w/ water, clean with acetone, then
          rinse again. This probably isn't the best method, but it works for me
          without having to fool around with more acids.

          Also, DO NOT USE TAP WATER! Buy some de-ionzed water or boil and
          catch the steam from your tap water. Minerals from well water and
          chlorine from processed water can get into the pores and also cause
          spotty finishes.

          John


          --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "b_delerious" <b_delerious@...> wrote:
          >
          > I think the problem may have been the temperature, the container was
          > very warm/hot to the touch (guessing 100-120). I think its due to the
          > fact that i was using very small containers (ie the parts barely fit
          > in). I'll make a bigger bath and try again.
          >
          > I've been using Sodium Hydroxide (lye/caustic) to clean the parts,
          > though i've read that nitric acid is better,do you have any experience
          > with those?
          >
          > Thanks for the input, ill post back with results.
          >
          >
          > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "jkeyser14" <jkeyser14@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I've had fairly decent results.
          > >
          > > I use a 10% sulphuric acid concentration. First of all, make sure
          > > your aluminum is VERY clean or you will get spotting. Keep the amps
          > > per square inch at the recommended value (~13 amp hours per sq in).
          > > Also, make sure that your parts have a good contact. If they are not
          > > held extremely tight (IE you can wiggle them on your fixture), they
          > > will not anodize because your fixture will ano first, killing all
          > > electrical conductivity. The acid bath must stay between 65 and 75
          > > deg Farenheit. Keep the dye bath between 130 and 145 deg F. Also, if
          > > you aren't using a nickel acetate sealant, steaming is the best method
          > > to seal the parts since it will leach less colors.
          > >
          > > Generally, it takes about an hour and a half in the acid bath for
          > > smaller parts. Dye time depends on the color you are going for,
          > > normally anywhere from 2 min to 5 min. Then I steam for at least as
          > > long as the acid bath time.
          > >
          > > I've never used a car battery charger since you can't control
          > > amperage, what my friend and I setup was a computer power supply
          > > connected to a PWM controller. Not the best of methods, but it still
          > > lets us ramp up to our desired amperage slowly (not ramping up can
          > > cause your fixture to anodize prematurely, once again loosing
          contact).
          > >
          > > Since you are at a school, look for a book in your library called The
          > > Canning Handbook on Electroplating. They've got a very good section
          > > on anodizing (the might have spelled it anodising, they're Brittish).
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "b_delerious" <b_delerious@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Hi guys,
          > > >
          > > > I've looked over several anodizing recipes, and have tried a few out
          > > > (I'm at a university so i have access to lots of equipment and
          > > > chemicals!), but all i end up doing is eating away the aluminum, and
          > > > the coating (if any) doesn't seem to be very hard at all (scratches
          > > > off easily with another untreated aluminum chunk.
          > > >
          > > > I've been using permutations of these recipes (and a few more):
          > > > http://www.warpig.com/paintball/technical/anodize.shtml
          > > > http://www.artmetal.com/project/TOC/finishes/anodize.html
          > > >
          > > > Anyone having better luck/skill than me?
          > > >
          > > > -B
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • J Hamilton
          ... I stumbled upon Focuser.com in my studies of anodizing for aluminum some time ago. He really does have the best at home kit setup. If that s what you re
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 2, 2006
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            --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, benedict-list@... wrote:
            >
            > I had pretty good luck with Ron Newman's setup:

            I stumbled upon Focuser.com in my studies of anodizing for aluminum
            some time ago. He really does have the best "at home" kit setup. If
            that's what you're setting up at home, and you want to do runs of
            parts, he has a great system he developed in his garage. Kudos to him
            for sharing online.

            If it's a small run you're doing, you might be better off running them
            locally at an anodizer. It's a caustic process, which has
            implications with other materials in your home, including YOU. Just a
            thought... I opted to use Duralectra because they are local to me...
            they did a fantastic job with "Sanford Process" Milspec Type III
            hardcoat at a price of around $100 for several linear feet of parts.
            They do all the hardcoat stuff for Bushmaster, BTW. Nice work.




            >
            > http://www.focuser.com/anodize.html
            >
            > I haven't picked up any of the kits he sells. The big thing in the
            kits
            > for me is the commercial dies. Organic cloth dies do fade under UV, so
            > the commercial anodizing dies look very attractive to me.
            >
            > Tom
            >
            > On Thu, 2 Feb 2006, b_delerious wrote:
            >
            > > Hi guys,
            > >
            > > I've looked over several anodizing recipes, and have tried a few out
            > > (I'm at a university so i have access to lots of equipment and
            > > chemicals!), but all i end up doing is eating away the aluminum, and
            > > the coating (if any) doesn't seem to be very hard at all (scratches
            > > off easily with another untreated aluminum chunk.
            > >
            > > I've been using permutations of these recipes (and a few more):
            > > http://www.warpig.com/paintball/technical/anodize.shtml
            > > http://www.artmetal.com/project/TOC/finishes/anodize.html
            > >
            > > Anyone having better luck/skill than me?
            > >
            > > -B
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@...
            > >
            > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-unsubscribe@...
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Let the chips fly!
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
          • b_delerious
            OK, I picked up the Canning Handbook on Electroplating, and they re amp recomendations are much smaller than yours. First it was ~10-15 amps per square foot
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 7, 2006
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              OK, I picked up the Canning Handbook on Electroplating, and they're
              amp recomendations are much smaller than yours. First it was ~10-15
              amps per square foot (not square inch) for 1 to 1.5 hours.

              Other than that the recomendations were exactly as you described. They
              also suggested that if you want to dye the anodized layer you should
              do it at higher acid concentrations ~15% and slightly warmer ~25
              degrees C. The warmer it is the better the dye's will hold (but too
              warm and it will eat your aluminum).



              All these are for general purpose anodizing, there are variations for
              hard, and semi-hard anodizing, etc. If anyone is interested, can put
              up some info, or scan a page or two.

              -B

              --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "jkeyser14" <jkeyser14@...> wrote:
              >
              > I've had fairly decent results.
              >
              > I use a 10% sulphuric acid concentration. First of all, make sure
              > your aluminum is VERY clean or you will get spotting. Keep the amps
              > per square inch at the recommended value (~13 amp hours per sq in).
              > Also, make sure that your parts have a good contact. If they are not
              > held extremely tight (IE you can wiggle them on your fixture), they
              > will not anodize because your fixture will ano first, killing all
              > electrical conductivity. The acid bath must stay between 65 and 75
              > deg Farenheit. Keep the dye bath between 130 and 145 deg F. Also, if
              > you aren't using a nickel acetate sealant, steaming is the best method
              > to seal the parts since it will leach less colors.
              >
              > Generally, it takes about an hour and a half in the acid bath for
              > smaller parts. Dye time depends on the color you are going for,
              > normally anywhere from 2 min to 5 min. Then I steam for at least as
              > long as the acid bath time.
              >
              > I've never used a car battery charger since you can't control
              > amperage, what my friend and I setup was a computer power supply
              > connected to a PWM controller. Not the best of methods, but it still
              > lets us ramp up to our desired amperage slowly (not ramping up can
              > cause your fixture to anodize prematurely, once again loosing contact).
              >
              > Since you are at a school, look for a book in your library called The
              > Canning Handbook on Electroplating. They've got a very good section
              > on anodizing (the might have spelled it anodising, they're Brittish).
              >
              >
            • jkeyser14
              OOOPS!!! I meant feet, not inches. I need to start getting more sleep. ... contact).
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 7, 2006
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                OOOPS!!! I meant feet, not inches. I need to start getting more sleep.


                --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "b_delerious" <b_delerious@...> wrote:
                >
                > OK, I picked up the Canning Handbook on Electroplating, and they're
                > amp recomendations are much smaller than yours. First it was ~10-15
                > amps per square foot (not square inch) for 1 to 1.5 hours.
                >
                > Other than that the recomendations were exactly as you described. They
                > also suggested that if you want to dye the anodized layer you should
                > do it at higher acid concentrations ~15% and slightly warmer ~25
                > degrees C. The warmer it is the better the dye's will hold (but too
                > warm and it will eat your aluminum).
                >
                >
                >
                > All these are for general purpose anodizing, there are variations for
                > hard, and semi-hard anodizing, etc. If anyone is interested, can put
                > up some info, or scan a page or two.
                >
                > -B
                >
                > --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "jkeyser14" <jkeyser14@> wrote:
                > >
                > > I've had fairly decent results.
                > >
                > > I use a 10% sulphuric acid concentration. First of all, make sure
                > > your aluminum is VERY clean or you will get spotting. Keep the amps
                > > per square inch at the recommended value (~13 amp hours per sq in).
                > > Also, make sure that your parts have a good contact. If they are not
                > > held extremely tight (IE you can wiggle them on your fixture), they
                > > will not anodize because your fixture will ano first, killing all
                > > electrical conductivity. The acid bath must stay between 65 and 75
                > > deg Farenheit. Keep the dye bath between 130 and 145 deg F. Also, if
                > > you aren't using a nickel acetate sealant, steaming is the best method
                > > to seal the parts since it will leach less colors.
                > >
                > > Generally, it takes about an hour and a half in the acid bath for
                > > smaller parts. Dye time depends on the color you are going for,
                > > normally anywhere from 2 min to 5 min. Then I steam for at least as
                > > long as the acid bath time.
                > >
                > > I've never used a car battery charger since you can't control
                > > amperage, what my friend and I setup was a computer power supply
                > > connected to a PWM controller. Not the best of methods, but it still
                > > lets us ramp up to our desired amperage slowly (not ramping up can
                > > cause your fixture to anodize prematurely, once again loosing
                contact).
                > >
                > > Since you are at a school, look for a book in your library called The
                > > Canning Handbook on Electroplating. They've got a very good section
                > > on anodizing (the might have spelled it anodising, they're Brittish).
                > >
                > >
                >
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