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Re: [taigtools] Quick Change Tool Post Drawings

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  • Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein
    Don t underestimate the incredible difference between figuring out which shims to use, and simply adjusting a screw for height. I find I sharpen my tools more
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 30, 2000
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      Don't underestimate the incredible difference between figuring out which
      shims to use, and simply adjusting a screw for height. I find I sharpen my
      tools more also, as putting them back on center is that much easier.
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Tony Jeffree <tony@...>
      To: <taigtools@egroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2000 10:34 PM
      Subject: Re: [taigtools] Quick Change Tool Post Drawings
      > However, I'm still confused as to the perceived advantages of a QC system
      > such as this over the purchase of a load of spare Taig toolposts & using
      > them as a QC system. Is it just the fact that you don't have to mess with
      > shims to get the too to height? All else seems to be a wash - once set
      up,
      > changing a tool involves using a single bolt.
    • Tony Jeffree
      ... Fair point. I get around that problem by using disposable carbide insert tools - no re-shimming needed when you turn the insert to a new edge (or replace
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 1, 2000
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        At 23:16 30/11/00 -0800, you wrote:
        >Don't underestimate the incredible difference between figuring out which
        >shims to use, and simply adjusting a screw for height. I find I sharpen my
        >tools more also, as putting them back on center is that much easier.

        Fair point. I get around that problem by using disposable carbide insert
        tools - no re-shimming needed when you turn the insert to a new edge (or
        replace with a new one). Expensive option, I know, but perfect for lazy
        people like me ;-)

        Regards,
        Tony
      • Phil Jaster
        Lawrence ... Well DONE. I will probably do a bit of metal work again and make this!!!! Thank you for sharing your design!!!!! phil jaster, mostly wood working
        Message 3 of 11 , Dec 1, 2000
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          Lawrence

          ::::> just viewed your two .jpgs. Very Nice. Nice Clarity of thought.

          Well DONE.

          I will probably do a bit of metal work again and make this!!!!

          Thank you for sharing your design!!!!!

          phil jaster, mostly wood working nowadays!

          > I've uploaded a couple of JPG files into the folder titled "Lawrence
          > Keating's Folder".
          >
          > TPASSY.JPG - a General Assembly drawing of a quick change tool post
          > system for the Taig lathe.
          >
          > TPDTLS.JPG - details the components for the Quick Change system.
          >
          > This system was designed for the type of work I do on my lathe using
          > materials I had on hand. This is only one way to build a quck change
          > system - please feel free to modify to suit your particular methods,
          > materials, etc.
          > I don't offer any performance guarantees - but it's worked well for
          > me for the last few weeks.
          > Enjoy...
        • Tom Benedict
          ... The one other difference that has been brought up, which applies to QC systems with a fixed tool orientation, is that you can rapidly switch from tool to
          Message 4 of 11 , Dec 1, 2000
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            On Thu, 30 Nov 2000, Nicholas Carter and Felice Luftschein wrote:

            > Don't underestimate the incredible difference between figuring out
            > which shims to use, and simply adjusting a screw for height. I find I
            > sharpen my tools more also, as putting them back on center is that
            > much easier.

            The one other difference that has been brought up, which applies to QC
            systems with a fixed tool orientation, is that you can rapidly switch from
            tool to tool, and not have to re-zero your axes.

            The only time I ever really did this (and I have to admit it would be nice
            to be able to do it more) is when I was making fifteen identical parts out
            of some brass hex stock. I wound up with three Taig toolposts on the
            cross slide at the same time. Once I'd zeroed them out, I was able to
            take cuts off of all three without re-zeroing.

            It would've been a lot less crowded if I could've swapped toolholders off
            of a QC toolpost!

            But I so very rarely do production runs like that, I'm happy having a
            zillion Taig toolposts in my toolbox.

            Tom

            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: Tony Jeffree <tony@...>
            > To: <taigtools@egroups.com>
            > Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2000 10:34 PM
            > Subject: Re: [taigtools] Quick Change Tool Post Drawings
            > > However, I'm still confused as to the perceived advantages of a QC system
            > > such as this over the purchase of a load of spare Taig toolposts & using
            > > them as a QC system. Is it just the fact that you don't have to mess with
            > > shims to get the too to height? All else seems to be a wash - once set
            > up,
            > > changing a tool involves using a single bolt.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@...
            >
            > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-unsubscribe@...
            >
            >
            >
            > Let the chips fly!
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Tom Benedict
            ... Not too expensive, actually. Harbor Freight has a set for about $20 with 1/4 square shanks. I got a set, fearing the worst (this is Harbor Freight...)
            Message 5 of 11 , Dec 1, 2000
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              On Fri, 1 Dec 2000, Tony Jeffree wrote:

              > At 23:16 30/11/00 -0800, you wrote:
              > >Don't underestimate the incredible difference between figuring out which
              > >shims to use, and simply adjusting a screw for height. I find I sharpen my
              > >tools more also, as putting them back on center is that much easier.
              >
              > Fair point. I get around that problem by using disposable carbide
              > insert tools - no re-shimming needed when you turn the insert to a new
              > edge (or replace with a new one). Expensive option, I know, but
              > perfect for lazy people like me ;-)

              Not too expensive, actually. Harbor Freight has a set for about $20 with
              1/4" square shanks. I got a set, fearing the worst (this is Harbor
              Freight...) Turns out the BOX they come in is a little shabby, and the
              screws they use to hold the inserts on aren't the best in the world, but
              the tools and the inserts themselves are pretty nice.

              Tom
            • Robin
              From my rather limited experience in a machine shop (radiation physics shop in a hospital) It s very useful to be able to put ANY tool in quickly and have it
              Message 6 of 11 , Dec 1, 2000
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                From my rather limited experience in a machine shop (radiation
                physics shop in a hospital) It's very useful to be able to put ANY
                tool in quickly and have it right where it should be. With a real QC
                post, you can hit the stop button and 3-7 seconds later hit the start
                and begin cutting again. This includes ANY time of tool. Parting
                tool, facing, shaping, and *tools* that are used to set up work, like
                a depth stop.

                Right now, I'm making clones of about 7 different pieces (500 clones
                each). It takes me about 3 minutes to make a part with my current
                setup (Colchester Master 2500 lathe w/ QC post). For the part, I have
                to use a parting tool to form a step, move the tool over and then
                part off the piece. I use a block of aluminum on a QC tool holder to
                setup the first cut, and then the compound cross slide to move the
                cutter to the right position for the part off. VERY useful. With any
                other setup, it would probably take my twice as long, at least.

                Granted, most people don't to production work on a Taig, but it's
                still very helpful.

                I guess you have to play with a QC before it becomes apparent that
                they're useful.

                Robin

                --- In taigtools@egroups.com, Tom Benedict <benedict@a...> wrote:
                > On Fri, 1 Dec 2000, Tony Jeffree wrote:
                >
                > > At 23:16 30/11/00 -0800, you wrote:
                > > >Don't underestimate the incredible difference between figuring
                out which
                > > >shims to use, and simply adjusting a screw for height. I find I
                sharpen my
                > > >tools more also, as putting them back on center is that much
                easier.
                > >
                > > Fair point. I get around that problem by using disposable carbide
                > > insert tools - no re-shimming needed when you turn the insert to
                a new
                > > edge (or replace with a new one). Expensive option, I know, but
                > > perfect for lazy people like me ;-)
                >
                > Not too expensive, actually. Harbor Freight has a set for about
                $20 with
                > 1/4" square shanks. I got a set, fearing the worst (this is Harbor
                > Freight...) Turns out the BOX they come in is a little shabby, and
                the
                > screws they use to hold the inserts on aren't the best in the
                world, but
                > the tools and the inserts themselves are pretty nice.
                >
                > Tom
              • Lawrence Keating
                ... A valid point for anyone doing production type work. However, most of my stuff (at least right now) is one-off so I kept it as simple as possible. Besides
                Message 7 of 11 , Dec 1, 2000
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                  --- In taigtools@egroups.com, "Robin " <lasernerd@h...> wrote:
                  > Hey Lawrence,
                  >
                  > Nice design. I have a concern though. There's no way to keep the
                  > orientation of the tool after it's removed. Perhaps this isn't a
                  > major problem, but for those doing some type of small production
                  > work, it would be helpful to be able to drop your tool in the exact
                  > same position after removing it.

                  A valid point for anyone doing production type work. However, most
                  of my stuff (at least right now) is one-off so I kept it as simple as
                  possible. Besides which, it never even crossed my mind!! ;)

                  > Also, I'm wondering if it's such a great idea to make the tool
                  holder out of aluminum. Because the tool holder will have to be
                  clamped repeatedly, perhaps it should be made of steel to prevent the
                  threads from failing too quickly.

                  Taig uses threaded holes in several of their aluminum components that
                  get used frequently but don't seem to give any problems eg.
                  tailstock, milling vise, etc. As long as one doesn't start using a
                  Johnson bar to tighten the clamp, it should work fine. A little
                  lubricant on the threads will help prevent any galling.

                  > All those things aside, I think you really hit a good idea. The
                  ease
                  > of manufacturing coupled with the ease of use is brilliant. Not
                  that
                  > I'm particularly well-versed in the world of QC toolposts, but I
                  must
                  > say I've never seen anything like your design.

                  Actually, the idea for this design came from a back issue of Model
                  Engineer's Workshop (British magazine). The article described making
                  a similar QC tool post for a Myford. When I saw it, the ol' light
                  bulb went "Click".

                  > And one tiny thing about your drawing :) It doesn't say the height
                  of
                  > the aluminum tool holder. I'm assuming it's 1"?

                  Aaargh!!! I don't know how many times I looked at the drawings - and
                  still missed a dimension! Yes - 1" is the correct value. I've
                  uploaded a new detail drawing that shows the dimension. In my old
                  design/drafting days, we always checked other people's drawings,
                  never our own. Now I know why!:)
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