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Re: [taigtools] mills for brass and plastic?

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  • Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter
    For most work, two flute, center cutting (that way you can plunge it into the work) endmills work fine. HSS is fine unless you are cutting difficult materials.
    Message 1 of 23 , Jun 1, 2005
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      For most work, two flute, center cutting (that way you can plunge it into
      the work) endmills work fine.
      HSS is fine unless you are cutting difficult materials.


      felice@... is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. Check out our
      homepage www.cartertools.com/nfhome.html
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Rob Kirkham" <rdkirkham@...>
      To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, June 01, 2005 7:50 PM
      Subject: [taigtools] mills for brass and plastic?


      > Hello - I'm a beginner at using the milling features of the Taig lathe.
      I'm using it to make small parts out of brass, styrene and nylon. I am
      wondering what sort of mill's to buy for this work. I have the collet set.
      I'm wondering if the stock taig mills are partly what I need, but
      insufficiently tine for part of the job.
      >
      > My first project is to cut out some 1/16" thick brass into a small HO
      scale locomotive side frame. So the overall piece will be about 1/2" tall
      and 4 inches long, with small cutouts and notches approximately 1/8 inch or
      so wide.
      >
      > I'm thinking any mill about 1/8" in diameter will basically do the job.
      But should it be four flutes, or two? What material should they be? What
      else is there to think about in buying mills?
      >
      > My second project is to make a coupler pocket out of styrene - something
      about 1/4" cubed. The finished piece will be like a five sided box. The
      sixth side will be framed to leave a rectangular opening about 1/16th" by
      1/8th". There will be very thin flanges mounted to the outer sides of the
      box.
      >
      > So the mills will have to be capable of creating small shapes with square
      corners. Again, what design is preferable? how many flutes, what material,
      etc?
      >
      > Thanks for some tips on this new (to me) subject
      >
      > Rob Kirkham
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@...
      >
      > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-unsubscribe@...
      >
      >
      >
      > Let the chips fly!
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Codesuidae
      ... I ve been looking pretty much exclusively at solid carbide endmills, but I m cutting mostly aluminum (either the cheap strap from the hardware store or
      Message 2 of 23 , Jun 2, 2005
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        Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter wrote:

        >HSS is fine unless you are cutting difficult materials.
        >
        >
        I've been looking pretty much exclusively at solid carbide endmills, but
        I'm cutting mostly aluminum (either the cheap strap from the hardware
        store or Fortal/7075). Would HSS endmills be a cheaper option? I'm
        having difficulty finding smallish (1/8, 1/16, etc) carbide mills for
        less than about 5 bucks each.

        Thanks
        Dave
      • Rob Kirkham
        Thanks Nick. That s what I needed. Rob Kirkham ... From: Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter For most work, two flute, center cutting (that way you can
        Message 3 of 23 , Jun 2, 2005
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          Thanks Nick. That's what I needed.

          Rob Kirkham
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter

          For most work, two flute, center cutting (that way you can plunge it into
          the work) endmills work fine.
          HSS is fine unless you are cutting difficult materials.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter
          five bucks an endmill is pretty cheap, finding HSS endmills for less would be difficult. The problem with carbide is that is is more prone to chipping than
          Message 4 of 23 , Jun 2, 2005
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            five bucks an endmill is pretty cheap, finding HSS endmills for less would
            be difficult.
            The problem with carbide is that is is more prone to chipping than HSS.

            felice@... is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. Check out our
            homepage www.cartertools.com/nfhome.html
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Codesuidae" <codesuidae@...>
            To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, June 02, 2005 6:59 AM
            Subject: Re: [taigtools] mills for brass and plastic?


            > Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter wrote:
            >
            > >HSS is fine unless you are cutting difficult materials.
            > >
            > >
            > I've been looking pretty much exclusively at solid carbide endmills, but
            > I'm cutting mostly aluminum (either the cheap strap from the hardware
            > store or Fortal/7075). Would HSS endmills be a cheaper option? I'm
            > having difficulty finding smallish (1/8, 1/16, etc) carbide mills for
            > less than about 5 bucks each.
            >
            > Thanks
            > Dave
          • benedict-list@hawaii.rr.com
            ... All of those should cut nicely with two flute HSS mills. Not sure how much you ve cut those materials, but it bears mentioning that brass likes to be cut
            Message 5 of 23 , Jun 2, 2005
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              On Wed, 1 Jun 2005, Rob Kirkham wrote:

              > Hello - I'm a beginner at using the milling features of the Taig lathe.
              > I'm using it to make small parts out of brass, styrene and nylon. I am
              > wondering what sort of mill's to buy for this work. I have the collet
              > set. I'm wondering if the stock taig mills are partly what I need, but
              > insufficiently tine for part of the job.

              All of those should cut nicely with two flute HSS mills. Not sure how
              much you've cut those materials, but it bears mentioning that brass likes
              to be cut dry. I've cut nylon dry, but it helps to have something to keep
              the tool cool so the plastic bits don't weld themselves onto it. I've
              used spray cooling, flood cooling, and just a blast from an air hose.
              They all work fine. Anything that keeps it cool works. Styrene's kinda
              similar to nylon, but a lot less stringy.

              > My first project is to cut out some 1/16" thick brass into a small HO
              > scale locomotive side frame. So the overall piece will be about 1/2"
              > tall and 4 inches long, with small cutouts and notches approximately 1/8
              > inch or so wide.

              Mmmm... Brass is gorgeous stuff to cut. One of my faves. That'd be a
              fun project.

              > I'm thinking any mill about 1/8" in diameter will basically do the job.
              > But should it be four flutes, or two? What material should they be?
              > What else is there to think about in buying mills?

              For almost everything, a two flute mill works well. Four flute mills work
              better on harder materials. I've got some in my box at work and almost
              never pull them out because almost everything I do is in a relatively soft
              material.

              There's another advantage to using a two-flute mill: If you're cutting
              slots with the mill (say cutting a 1/8" wide feature with a 1/8" diameter
              mill), the two flute will cut closer to size than a four flute will.
              Here's why:

              All mills flex when you cut, regarldess of size. The smaller ones just
              flex more. With a 1/8" mill, errors in cut geometry because of flex can
              be quite apparent. (This is a strong argument in favor of making a
              finishing pass along any cut face, but I digress.)

              In the case of a slot, all the cutting is taking place at the very end of
              the slot. As the tool rotates, the cutting edge will dig into the metal
              and the tool will flex to one side.

              With a four flute mill, at any one time you have one tooth engaged at the
              front of the slot, one engaged on either side, and one moving freely in
              the space that's already been cut. If your tool flexes to one side, one
              of the side teeth will dig in and begin to cut as well. You wind up with
              a slightly oversized slot.

              With a two flute mill, at any one time you either have both teeth engaged
              at the sides of the slot, in which case no cutting is taking place and no
              flexure is happening. OR you have one tooth engaged at the front of the
              slot and one moving freely in the space that's already been cut. Even
              with tool flex, nothing is digging into the sides of the slot and the slot
              pretty much comes out on-size.

              I've been told this and shown it with lots of neat diagrams, but I'd never
              gone looking for it. So a while back I gave it a try. I tried a pair of
              1/8", 3/16", and 1/4" mills in my Taig. I'd make a pass with a two-flute,
              make a pass with a four-flute, then switch to the next size. Sure 'nuff I
              wound up with wider slots on the four-flute mills. I can't rememeber the
              numbers, but if I was able to measure them then they were too big for me.

              Probably more information than you were after. Sorry 'bout that.

              > My second project is to make a coupler pocket out of styrene - something
              > about 1/4" cubed. The finished piece will be like a five sided box.
              > The sixth side will be framed to leave a rectangular opening about
              > 1/16th" by 1/8th". There will be very thin flanges mounted to the outer
              > sides of the box.
              >
              > So the mills will have to be capable of creating small shapes with
              > square corners. Again, what design is preferable? how many flutes,
              > what material, etc?

              When you say square corners, do you mean square corners on the outside
              angles, or on the inside angles? Outside corners are no sweat. Inside
              corners are a question of geometry. So long as one face can be cut by the
              side of the mill and another face by the bottom of the mill, sharp corners
              are no problem. But if you're down in a pocket or something and the
              sidewalls need to meet at a sharp angle it's kinda tough. Doable, but
              tough.

              In any case, again I'd reach for a two flute mill.

              As far as materials go, almost all my mills are HSS. They're relatively
              cheap, relatively common, and it's easy to pick up a couple of each size
              when I order them.

              A word about ordering end mills: They are consumables. They do break,
              they do wear out, and it's nothing to blame yourself for or lose sleep
              over. When you buy end mills, get several of each size you're getting.
              There's nothing quite like being sixteen hours into a part and breaking /
              dulling / killing your last end mill in the size you need. "ARGH!" just
              doesn't cover it. I finished a project over the weekend that depleted the
              last of my 1/4" mills. Time to order more.

              Going back to your question, I do have some carbide mills. Mostly they're
              the teeny ones, 1/16" and smaller. I've also got most of those sizes
              covered in HSS. No matter which route you go, they get more expensive the
              smaller you get. They also break more easily.

              Carbide mills are less prone to dulling, less prone to flexure, but more
              prone to snapping off with that annoying little "TINK!" sound. HSS mills
              are more prone to dulling (not a huge problem in any of the materials you
              mentioned), more prone to flex, but less prone to snapping off. It's
              always a trade-off. I try to treat the smaller mills with a great deal of
              care regardless of what they're made of.

              > Thanks for some tips on this new (to me) subject

              Hey, no problem. Hope I didn't bore you. I can't wait to see how these
              parts come out. Mind posting pictures?

              Tom
            • Rob Kirkham
              Tom, thanks for the further info answering my questions. I appreciated your comments on the 4 and 2 flute mills, and accuracy issues. I much prefer learning
              Message 6 of 23 , Jun 2, 2005
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                Tom, thanks for the further info answering my questions. I appreciated your comments on the 4 and 2 flute mills, and accuracy issues. I much prefer learning from others to learning by trial and error! At least when I'm working with styrene, the errors are not as painful.

                Regarding those square corners, as I indicated briefly before, the coupler pocket is meant to look like a tiny rectangular 5 sided box with very slim fins projecting out from the sides - sort of like a rectangular fish. I can mill the outside shape from larger stock to shape the five sides and fins. That will merely take rotating the piece so the mill can work over each side seperately.

                But the inside of the box perplexes me. I cannot see how to get the mill into the corners or tight along the lines/corners where adjacent sides meet. (Of course, if I mill the box as two pieces, then the problem is largely resolved. That may be the best option.) But before I abandon my original plan, is there a technique for cutting square cornered holes?



                Thanks again

                Rob Kirkham



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter
                The answer is yes and no Watts square drills leave a radius. Methods such as broaching and rotary broaching are only good for holes. Endmills always leave a
                Message 7 of 23 , Jun 2, 2005
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                  The answer is yes and no
                  Watts square drills leave a radius. Methods such as broaching and rotary
                  broaching are only good for holes.
                  Endmills always leave a radius.

                  Since you are working with styrene, best bet is to grind a toolbit with the
                  angle of the square corner (is it 90 degrees?) and basically take a
                  chiselling/paring/shaping cut downwards as though the mill were a metal
                  shaper, after the corner is roughed out with an endmill. This obviously
                  falls into the experimental work category.

                  Best thing is to never,ever,ever design a part with an internal sharp
                  corner.

                  felice@... is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. Check out our
                  homepage www.cartertools.com/nfhome.html
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Rob Kirkham" <rdkirkham@...>
                  To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Thursday, June 02, 2005 9:37 PM
                  Subject: [taigtools] mills for brass and plastic?


                  >But before I abandon my original plan, is there a technique for cutting
                  square cornered holes?
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Thanks again
                  >
                  > Rob Kirkham
                • Larry Richter
                  In a material as waxy as Styrene, you could drive broach square corners--basically a home-made box chisel that goes in and cleans up the radii after milling.
                  Message 8 of 23 , Jun 2, 2005
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                    In a material as waxy as Styrene, you could drive broach square
                    corners--basically a home-made box chisel that goes in and cleans up the
                    radii after milling. But why? This part wants to be molded.
                  • Rob Kirkham
                    Larry thanks for the idea of the box chisel. As for molding the part, I wish. But I wasn t planning on making too many, and the cost of tooling to mold this
                    Message 9 of 23 , Jun 2, 2005
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                      Larry thanks for the idea of the box chisel. As for molding the part, I wish. But I wasn't planning on making too many, and the cost of tooling to mold this part is way out of my hobby budget.

                      Rob Kirkham

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Rob Kirkham
                      Thanks Nick - I think the never ever ever part of your answer is staring to make a fair amount of sense! Rob Kirkham [Non-text portions of this message have
                      Message 10 of 23 , Jun 2, 2005
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                        Thanks Nick - I think the "never ever ever" part of your answer is staring to make a fair amount of sense!

                        Rob Kirkham

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • benedict-list@hawaii.rr.com
                        ... Mmmmmyes. There are a couple. Before I do, though, any chance you have a drawing or sketch of this beastie that you could post in the photos area? I m
                        Message 11 of 23 , Jun 6, 2005
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                          On Thu, 2 Jun 2005, Rob Kirkham wrote:

                          > Tom, thanks for the further info answering my questions. I appreciated
                          > your comments on the 4 and 2 flute mills, and accuracy issues. I much
                          > prefer learning from others to learning by trial and error! At least
                          > when I'm working with styrene, the errors are not as painful.
                          >
                          > Regarding those square corners, as I indicated briefly before, the
                          > coupler pocket is meant to look like a tiny rectangular 5 sided box with
                          > very slim fins projecting out from the sides - sort of like a
                          > rectangular fish. I can mill the outside shape from larger stock to
                          > shape the five sides and fins. That will merely take rotating the piece
                          > so the mill can work over each side seperately.
                          >
                          > But the inside of the box perplexes me. I cannot see how to get the
                          > mill into the corners or tight along the lines/corners where adjacent
                          > sides meet. (Of course, if I mill the box as two pieces, then the
                          > problem is largely resolved. That may be the best option.) But before I
                          > abandon my original plan, is there a technique for cutting square
                          > cornered holes?

                          Mmmmmyes. There are a couple. Before I do, though, any chance you have a
                          drawing or sketch of this beastie that you could post in the photos area?
                          I'm having a hard time visualizing it. (I don't know anything about
                          trains.)

                          Some ways to make square holes:

                          1 - Decide how sharp your corners need to be, and use a mill that's
                          smaller. F'rinstance, if you're making a square hole that a square shaft
                          will fit into, chances are the corners on the square shaft are slightly
                          rounded. Measure that radius and use a mill that's got a smaller radius.
                          Hog out as much of the hole as you can with a big mill, then switch to the
                          teensy one for finishing. This doesn't help in all situations.

                          2 - Use a square drill. I have not done this, but you can make drill bits
                          shaped kinda like the rotors on a rotary Wankel engine. With the proper
                          drill bushing attached to the work, the drill is free to wobble around in
                          the hole, producing a square hole. Again, I have not done this. I've
                          seen it mentioned in a couple of places, and saw a picture of the tooling
                          once or twice. I wish I had the reference for it. I don't do many square
                          holes, so I think I looked at it and went, "Huh! Funky." That's as far
                          as I took it.

                          3 - Get friendly with a file. Most of the square holes I've done have
                          been through holes, so there hasn't been any problem sticking a square
                          file down the hole to finish out the corners. This lets me use a
                          reasonably sized end mill to make the hole, and only takes a little elbow
                          grease. I'm not that good at filing, though, so I can't call this a
                          precision process with me. Someone who's good at hand filing should be
                          able to make a really nice close tolerance hole this way.

                          4 - Get friendly with a chisel. Same idea, but for blind holes. If I'm
                          not that skilled with a file, I'm absolutely horrid with chisels. I get
                          the feeling I'd wind up with an asterisk shaped hole. But again, someone
                          who's good at the technique should be able to make a really nice close
                          tolerance hole this way.

                          5 - Get out a protractor and get ready to do some funky angles on the
                          mill. If you get a 60-degree V-tip cutter, mount your vise 45 degrees to
                          the X and Y axes, and tilt the head over by
                        • Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter
                          Unfortunately the square drills leave a small radius on the corners. I shouldn t be allowed to buy things on Ebay... They are really cool, sometime when I have
                          Message 12 of 23 , Jun 6, 2005
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                            Unfortunately the square drills leave a small radius on the corners. I
                            shouldn't be allowed to buy things on Ebay...
                            They are really cool, sometime when I have nothing else to do I'll put up
                            some pics of them in action...

                            A wobble broach would work, but they are expensive...
                            felice@... is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. Check out our
                            homepage www.cartertools.com/nfhome.html
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: <benedict-list@...>
                            To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Monday, June 06, 2005 8:45 AM
                            Subject: Re: [taigtools] mills for brass and plastic?


                            > 2 - Use a square drill. I have not done this, but you can make drill bits
                            > shaped kinda like the rotors on a rotary Wankel engine. With the proper
                            > drill bushing attached to the work, the drill is free to wobble around in
                            > the hole, producing a square hole. Again, I have not done this. I've
                            > seen it mentioned in a couple of places, and saw a picture of the tooling
                            > once or twice. I wish I had the reference for it. I don't do many square
                            > holes, so I think I looked at it and went, "Huh! Funky." That's as far
                            > as I took it.
                          • Larry Richter
                            ... From: Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter To: Sent: Monday, June 06, 2005 9:30 AM Subject: Re:
                            Message 13 of 23 , Jun 6, 2005
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                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: "Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter" <felice@...>
                              To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
                              Sent: Monday, June 06, 2005 9:30 AM
                              Subject: Re: [taigtools] mills for brass and plastic?


                              > Unfortunately the square drills leave a small radius on the corners. I
                              > shouldn't be allowed to buy things on Ebay...
                              > They are really cool, sometime when I have nothing else to do I'll put up
                              > some pics of them in action...
                              >
                              > A wobble broach would work, but they are expensive...


                              What's a wobble broach, in a sentence or two?
                            • Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter
                              Basically a tool with the profile you want to sink into the work (you need to drill a pilot hole) that rotates freely in a bearing and is mounted at an angle
                              Message 14 of 23 , Jun 6, 2005
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                                Basically a tool with the profile you want to sink into the work (you need
                                to drill a pilot hole) that rotates freely in a bearing and is mounted at an
                                angle off of the spindle axis (usually a couple of degrees) as the work
                                rotates it rotates the broach and the broach wobbles and carves out the
                                profile.
                                See here:
                                http://www.slatertools.com/
                                and here:
                                http://www.sommatool.com/catalog/tool.holders/broaches.main.asp


                                felice@... is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. Check out our
                                homepage www.cartertools.com/nfhome.html
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: "Larry Richter" <cattaraugus@...>
                                To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
                                Sent: Monday, June 06, 2005 9:39 AM
                                Subject: Re: [taigtools] mills for brass and plastic?


                                >
                                > ----- Original Message -----
                                > From: "Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter" <felice@...>
                                > To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
                                > Sent: Monday, June 06, 2005 9:30 AM
                                > Subject: Re: [taigtools] mills for brass and plastic?
                                >
                                >
                                > > Unfortunately the square drills leave a small radius on the corners. I
                                > > shouldn't be allowed to buy things on Ebay...
                                > > They are really cool, sometime when I have nothing else to do I'll put
                                up
                                > > some pics of them in action...
                                > >
                                > > A wobble broach would work, but they are expensive...
                                >
                                >
                                > What's a wobble broach, in a sentence or two?
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@...
                                >
                                > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-unsubscribe@...
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > Let the chips fly!
                                >
                                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                              • Larry Richter
                                ... From: Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter To: Sent: Monday, June 06, 2005 9:44 AM Subject: Re:
                                Message 15 of 23 , Jun 6, 2005
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                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: "Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter" <felice@...>
                                  To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Sent: Monday, June 06, 2005 9:44 AM
                                  Subject: Re: [taigtools] mills for brass and plastic?


                                  > Basically a tool with the profile you want to sink into the work (you need
                                  > to drill a pilot hole) that rotates freely in a bearing and is mounted at
                                  an
                                  > angle off of the spindle axis (usually a couple of degrees) as the work
                                  > rotates it rotates the broach and the broach wobbles and carves out the
                                  > profile.
                                  > See here:
                                  > http://www.slatertools.com/
                                  > and here:
                                  > http://www.sommatool.com/catalog/tool.holders/broaches.main.asp



                                  Video whips a couple of sentences. Thanks.
                                • benedict-list@hawaii.rr.com
                                  ... No fun! And here I was wanting to play. ... HAHAHAHAHA! Oh boy can I relate to that, Nick. ... That d be cool. I d love to see them. ... Expensive
                                  Message 16 of 23 , Jun 6, 2005
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                                    On Mon, 6 Jun 2005, Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter wrote:

                                    > Unfortunately the square drills leave a small radius on the corners.

                                    No fun! And here I was wanting to play.

                                    > I shouldn't be allowed to buy things on Ebay...

                                    HAHAHAHAHA! Oh boy can I relate to that, Nick.

                                    > They are really cool, sometime when I have nothing else to do I'll put
                                    > up some pics of them in action...

                                    That'd be cool. I'd love to see them.

                                    > A wobble broach would work, but they are expensive...

                                    Expensive and... you shouldn't be allowed to buy things on Ebay?

                                    Tom

                                    > ----- Original Message -----
                                    > From: <benedict-list@...>
                                    > To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
                                    > Sent: Monday, June 06, 2005 8:45 AM
                                    > Subject: Re: [taigtools] mills for brass and plastic?
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >> 2 - Use a square drill. I have not done this, but you can make drill bits
                                    >> shaped kinda like the rotors on a rotary Wankel engine. With the proper
                                    >> drill bushing attached to the work, the drill is free to wobble around in
                                    >> the hole, producing a square hole. Again, I have not done this. I've
                                    >> seen it mentioned in a couple of places, and saw a picture of the tooling
                                    >> once or twice. I wish I had the reference for it. I don't do many square
                                    >> holes, so I think I looked at it and went, "Huh! Funky." That's as far
                                    >> as I took it.
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@...
                                    >
                                    > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-unsubscribe@...
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Let the chips fly!
                                    >
                                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                  • Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter
                                    ... And I already bought a set on Ebay, cheap because they are an Indian knockoff, but both internal and external hex. The set I have does not have center
                                    Message 17 of 23 , Jun 6, 2005
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                                      > > A wobble broach would work, but they are expensive...
                                      >
                                      > Expensive and... you shouldn't be allowed to buy things on Ebay?
                                      >
                                      > Tom
                                      And I already bought a set on Ebay, cheap because they are an Indian
                                      knockoff, but both internal and external hex. The set I have does not have
                                      center adjustability though, which makes them less than accurate....

                                      I have a friend who refuses to even look an Ebay because he knows the
                                      terrible (wonderful) things for sale there.
                                    • Tim Angus
                                      On Mon, 6 Jun 2005 08:26:52 -1000 (HST) benedict-list@hawaii.rr.com ... I ve decided ebay is definitely a good place to go for tooling. My most recent steal
                                      Message 18 of 23 , Jun 6, 2005
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                                        On Mon, 6 Jun 2005 08:26:52 -1000 (HST) benedict-list@...
                                        wrote:
                                        > > I shouldn't be allowed to buy things on Ebay...
                                        >
                                        > HAHAHAHAHA! Oh boy can I relate to that, Nick.

                                        I've decided ebay is definitely a good place to go for tooling. My most
                                        recent steal saved me lots of money. Although on the other hand, would I
                                        have forked out for this bunch through normal channels? Probably not. So
                                        maybe it's lost me money...

                                        I shouldn't be allowed to buy things on ebay.

                                        http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7519014958
                                      • benedict-list@hawaii.rr.com
                                        Truth be told I haven t bought anything off Ebay in a while. Ok, that s not entirely true. I bought a replacement for the KBIC I blew up. But before that I
                                        Message 19 of 23 , Jun 6, 2005
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                                          Truth be told I haven't bought anything off Ebay in a while. Ok, that's
                                          not entirely true. I bought a replacement for the KBIC I blew up. But
                                          before that I um... Ok, so bought some materials off Ebay about six
                                          months ago. But before... Ok, I'm busted. Ebay is dangerous.

                                          Tom

                                          On Mon, 6 Jun 2005, Tim Angus wrote:

                                          > On Mon, 6 Jun 2005 08:26:52 -1000 (HST) benedict-list@...
                                          > wrote:
                                          >>> I shouldn't be allowed to buy things on Ebay...
                                          >>
                                          >> HAHAHAHAHA! Oh boy can I relate to that, Nick.
                                          >
                                          > I've decided ebay is definitely a good place to go for tooling. My most
                                          > recent steal saved me lots of money. Although on the other hand, would I
                                          > have forked out for this bunch through normal channels? Probably not. So
                                          > maybe it's lost me money...
                                          >
                                          > I shouldn't be allowed to buy things on ebay.
                                          >
                                          > http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7519014958
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@...
                                          >
                                          > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-unsubscribe@...
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > Let the chips fly!
                                          >
                                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                        • Rob Kirkham
                                          Thanks for those ideas, I ll give some combination of them a try. I d post a drawing of the coupler pocket to the list, but both the list files and photos
                                          Message 20 of 23 , Jun 6, 2005
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                                            Thanks for those ideas, I'll give some combination of them a try.

                                            I'd post a drawing of the coupler pocket to the list, but both the list files and photos sections are full to the point nothing further can be added. I'm not sure whether the list allows attachments - some strip them off e-mails automatically. But here is a try.



                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          • Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter
                                            Should still be room on the taigfiles group, then post here about it. felice@casco.net is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. Check out our homepage
                                            Message 21 of 23 , Jun 6, 2005
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                                              Should still be room on the taigfiles group, then post here about it.

                                              felice@... is Felice Luftschein and Nicholas Carter. Check out our
                                              homepage www.cartertools.com/nfhome.html
                                              ----- Original Message -----
                                              From: "Rob Kirkham" <rdkirkham@...>
                                              To: <taigtools@yahoogroups.com>
                                              Sent: Monday, June 06, 2005 6:34 PM
                                              Subject: [taigtools] mills for brass and plastic?


                                              > Thanks for those ideas, I'll give some combination of them a try.
                                              >
                                              > I'd post a drawing of the coupler pocket to the list, but both the list
                                              files and photos sections are full to the point nothing further can be
                                              added. I'm not sure whether the list allows attachments - some strip them
                                              off e-mails automatically. But here is a try.
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@...
                                              >
                                              > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-unsubscribe@...
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > Let the chips fly!
                                              >
                                              > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                            • Rob Kirkham
                                              Actually, on looking again, I don t have the status to post anything to the files section. From what I read on the web page, the moderator has to grant that
                                              Message 22 of 23 , Jun 6, 2005
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                                                Actually, on looking again, I don't have the status to post anything to the files section. From what I read on the web page, the moderator has to grant that status. I'll be happy to post up the drawing if that can be changed?

                                                Rob Kirkham


                                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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