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Re: Holding carving wax

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  • bitshird
    ... Thanks Don, I ll look for some , there s a couple large pet stores about 50 miles from here. I have to build another computer any way and one of those
    Message 1 of 12 , Feb 2 7:03 AM
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      --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, Don Rogers <Don@C...> wrote:


      > Sticky Paws. .
      > Check your pet store.
      >
      > Don

      Thanks Don, I'll look for some , there's a couple large pet stores
      about 50 miles from here. I have to build another computer any way
      and one of those stores is near a computer store, so I can kill one
      check with two stores, ( Hold on a tick !I thought that was to kill
      two birds with one stone??) any way thanks for the tip.,
      Ken.
    • Andrew Werby
      Message: 14 Date: Tue, 01 Feb 2005 21:41:39 -0000 From: bitshird Subject: Holding carving wax I hope this isn t going off topic, I
      Message 2 of 12 , Feb 2 11:41 AM
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        Message: 14
        Date: Tue, 01 Feb 2005 21:41:39 -0000
        From: "bitshird" <zero-kool@...>
        Subject: Holding carving wax


        I hope this isn't going off topic, I have a Taig CNC and I have made
        clamps and have the Taig vise (which I consider nearly worthless) at
        least for my purposes. I realize that a quality vise costs more than
        the twenty something that the vise sells for.

        [You might check out Enco's selection of precision screwless vises.]

        I know several people that are making Jewelry master patterns using
        a Roland MDX 15 and they are using some type of double sided tape to
        secure the work piece to the table. In fact some are using Aluminum
        and making direct molds for wax injection, I've made several ΒΌ
        Plexiglas plates which I can clamp to my table but I'm not sure what
        type of double sided tape to use, and then how the heck do I get my
        piece off the wax. I know Andrew Werby watches this board on
        occasion and so does Tim from K&T. I was hoping that they could
        possibly offer some advice on this, or possibly Nick Carter has some
        sage solution.

        [I've got an MDX 15, but I've never been very enthusiastic about holding
        work down this way - it makes me nervous. I put a couple of square holes in
        the bed plate and use carriage bolts as hold-down studs. Holding onto wax
        with adhesives isn't too easy either. If you want to do this, try a few
        different types of double-stick tape and see which one works best on it. I
        use hot brown wax to hold the blue stuff down to an intermediary plate; that
        seems to stick well. For welding it, use a microcrystaline wax (like Victory
        Brown), and run a soldering iron from a rheostat to dial down the heat so
        the wax doesn't smoke.]

        I tried to mount a block of wax to a block of wood with double sided
        foam tape, the tape held to the wood, but not to the wax. Of course
        the force on the block was in a shearing action as I had it in my
        horizontal band saw and the weight of the saw pulled it off the
        block (old worn out craftsman) ordered a new saw from Harbor
        Freight.

        [I'd cut it the other way, with the wood underneath, so the wax is
        supported. Figure the wood is sacrificial, and cut right through it.]

        Now have to find a 3 or 4 inch tool makers vise that doesn't weigh
        30 or 40 pounds

        [The Enco vises aren't that heavy.]

        My reason for not clamping the wax to the table or to the plexi is
        surfacing, since the saws don't offer quite parallel cutting I need
        to surface the wax pieces before I machine the part, and clamps get
        in the way, a vise isn't much better because I usually cut the wax
        slices at 0.125 to 0.250 my parts are 0.070 to 0.200 this is why I'm
        wondering how to get the part off the tape, with out breaking it
        Sorry for the long post,
        Thanks
        Ken Ferrell
        (bitshird)

        [Those are some thin pieces of wax. I don't know how well a vise would hold
        it down - you wouldn't get much hold-down power by compressing the edges of
        it. Tape might work, but I think you're right to worry about distorting or
        breaking your parts in taking them off of it. For something like this, I'd
        think a vacuum hold-down system might be best. People who run routers
        commonly use them for holding down sheet goods. Basically, they are a plate
        with a vacuum inlet leading to a network of grooves. A second sheet of
        porous material is placed on top of that, and the workpiece lies on the top
        of the stack, held down by air pressure. An advantage of this is that fully
        cut-out parts don't fly up when liberated from their mother sheet. A
        miniature vacuum fixture like this would be a great aftermarket accessory
        for the Taig.

        You might look into getting your wax in sheet form instead of blocks. If
        that's not available, a circular saw would likely do a better job of slicing
        it than a bandsaw. Or you could try casting your own sheets - I've had
        pretty good luck remelting Freeman's blue machinable wax. ]

        Andrew Werby
        www.computersculpture.com
      • Steve Blackmore
        ... Hi Ken Program the start/end so it misses? - I ve just looked at Brian s Mach3 wizard and it s easy to control where it cuts. If it warps, use more clamps
        Message 3 of 12 , Feb 2 11:59 AM
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          On Wed, 02 Feb 2005 01:00:32 -0000, you wrote:

          >This would bring me right back to my initial problem, to surface my
          >stock, I use the surface wizard in Mach 2 or 3 which ever I'm
          >nearest at the time, invariably it will collide with at least one
          >of the hold downs.

          Hi Ken

          Program the start/end so it misses? - I've just looked at Brian's Mach3
          wizard and it's easy to control where it cuts. If it warps, use more
          clamps and/or make strips from ground flat stock to clamp around all the
          edges. If you make the wax 1" larger on all edges, clamp with 1/2 inch
          strip, then start surfacing at X1, Y1 that should give plenty of
          clearance.

          I often engrave on thin Copper, and find that too warps if not clamped
          all around.

          I've tried using tape, always ended up causing more damage removing the
          job off the bed, I would image that with wax it would be even worse <G>.


          Steve Blackmore
          --



          This e-mail was scanned for viruses using BitDefender
        • R Thomas
          I have used vacuum to hold plastic parts for machining with a 5hp 3-axis CNC router. I machined a manifold with an o-ring type gasket material layed into the
          Message 4 of 12 , Feb 2 8:01 PM
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            I have used vacuum to hold plastic parts for machining
            with a 5hp 3-axis CNC router. I machined a manifold
            with an o-ring type gasket material layed into the
            manifold block just inside the perimeter of the part.
            There were blocks clamped around the outside of the
            part to keep it from rotating but these were only
            required for smaller parts. Depending on the density
            of your wax it may cause deformation on the bottom.
            To limit the deformation you can experiment with the
            amount of surface area effected by the vacuum. I
            usually used about half of the surface for holding and
            the other half for support. Look up vacuum clamp,
            vacuum generator, vacuum hold down, etc. The vacuum
            generator is the only custom part required if you
            don't want to buy a kit.

            http://woodworker.com/cgi-bin/FULLPRES.exe?PARTNUM=104-741

            Richard
            www.homemachineshop.com





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          • jamesbabcock2004
            I have been cutting plexy glass for weeks. I got double sided duct tape from Lowes. If you use a piece of MDF board and clamp that to the table then use tape
            Message 5 of 12 , Feb 3 4:11 AM
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              I have been cutting plexy glass for weeks. I got double sided duct
              tape from Lowes. If you use a piece of MDF board and clamp that to
              the table then use tape on top of that it will hold quite a bit. I
              have to work hard to get the piece I am working on off of the tape.


              Jim.
            • myerm38
              I ve been cutting carving wax for some time. This may not work for you, but it does well for me: Make an aluminum tray to hold wax, one that has a good thick
              Message 6 of 12 , Feb 3 12:14 PM
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                I've been cutting carving wax for some time. This may not work for
                you, but it does well for me: Make an aluminum tray to hold wax, one
                that has a good thick base that you can clamp into the vise.
                Then put wax pieces in it and throw it in the oven for a few minutes.
                The wax melts into place and holds firm. Plus I can reuse the wax
                several times.
                Marc



                --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "jamesbabcock2004"
                <jamesbabcock2004@y...> wrote:
                >
                > I have been cutting plexy glass for weeks. I got double sided duct
                > tape from Lowes. If you use a piece of MDF board and clamp that to
                > the table then use tape on top of that it will hold quite a bit. I
                > have to work hard to get the piece I am working on off of the tape.
                >
                >
                > Jim.
              • fionn13
                I also have used superglue to hold down the wax and then remove with nail polish remover (acetone) You can also screw it to some MDF. by counter sinking the
                Message 7 of 12 , Feb 3 4:35 PM
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                  I also have used superglue to hold down the wax and then remove with
                  nail polish remover (acetone)

                  You can also screw it to some MDF. by counter sinking the screws you
                  can face off the top. just make sure you don't go cut too deep and
                  hit the screws.
                  You can than turn it over and do the other side.

                  Chris
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