Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

RE: [taigtools] Re: Puzzle Plans?

Expand Messages
  • Dave Goodfellow
    Hi Lynn: A wrist pin goes in the piston of a more complex engine -- a mill engine, which uses a different valving method. Both types of engine were actually
    Message 1 of 15 , Feb 1, 2004
      Hi Lynn:

      A wrist pin goes in the piston of a more complex engine -- a mill
      engine, which uses a different valving method. Both types of engine
      were actually used. The mill engine requires timing of the valve. With
      this engine, timing is built into the frame with positioning of the
      steam ports. The cylinder has to pivot to open one port while closing
      the other.

      The mill engine is more efficient than this one, because it doesn't have
      to deal with the friction between the cylinder and the frame.

      I't late and I'm pooped out. Did I make myself clear or was that
      gibberish?

      Thanks for the link. I have four now. After I study those urls, maybe
      I'll have a start.

      Dave Goodfellow

      =========================================

      Dave,

      Very nice work on the engine(s). Thanks for illustrating the engines
      and buildups. Even though I haven't been bitten buy the engine bug,
      it looks like something I might like to try someday.
      I have a question though, and I guarantee you I know nothing about
      these engines. Why are the cylinders built to pivot instead of
      putting a wrist pin in the piston?

      I don't know of any puzzles right off, but here is a site that might
      give you some ideas.
      http://www.johnrausch.com/DesignCompetition/2003/entries.htm
      I see where some of the prototypes are available. Maybe you could
      talk some of the designers out of some plans?
      Good Luck,

      Lynn Livingston
    • Lynn Livingston
      ... you put ... to ... out of ... think) ... between ... writeup at ... Dave, Here are some more ideas:
      Message 2 of 15 , Feb 1, 2004
        --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Goodfellow" <davegood@g...>
        wrote:
        > Does anyone know where I might find plans for a puzzle in which
        you put
        > a number of interlocking pieces together to form a cube? I'd like
        to
        > make one out of metal.
        >
        > Or any ideas for other projects (not tooling)? I've sort of run
        out of
        > steam on steam engines (pun intended). I completed one (#14, I
        think)
        > today, and it's time to change direction for a while. If anyone is
        > interested, it's a 2-cylindeer wobbler with the flywheel mounted
        between
        > them on a split frame -- 1" bore, 3/4" stroke. Pictures and
        writeup at
        > --
        >
        > http://www.good-fellow.net/doublewobbler.html
        >
        > Dave Goodfellow
        > Lancaster, CA
        > www.good-fellow.net
        > "No problem too small to baffle this expert"

        Dave,
        Here are some more ideas:
        http://www.bitsandpieces.com/product.asp?dept_id=2&sku=07-7070
        http://www.maxton.com/max5.html (click on the puzzles to see them
        dissasembled)
        http://home.compaqnet.nl/~kalde063/puzzels/menus/list/eng.htm (click
        on the puzzles for hints on how tho make them)
        Also, doing a Google search for 3-D puzzles brings up some
        interesting ideas.

        Lynn Livingston
      • Lynn Livingston
        ... engine ... valve. With ... closing ... doesn t have ... maybe ... I think I ve got it now. I understand that if the cylinder didn t pivot, then a more
        Message 3 of 15 , Feb 1, 2004
          --- In taigtools@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Goodfellow" <davegood@g...>
          wrote:
          > Hi Lynn:
          >
          > A wrist pin goes in the piston of a more complex engine -- a mill
          > engine, which uses a different valving method. Both types of
          engine
          > were actually used. The mill engine requires timing of the
          valve. With
          > this engine, timing is built into the frame with positioning of the
          > steam ports. The cylinder has to pivot to open one port while
          closing
          > the other.
          >
          > The mill engine is more efficient than this one, because it
          doesn't have
          > to deal with the friction between the cylinder and the frame.
          >
          > I't late and I'm pooped out. Did I make myself clear or was that
          > gibberish?
          >
          > Thanks for the link. I have four now. After I study those urls,
          maybe
          > I'll have a start.
          >
          > Dave Goodfellow

          I think I've got it now. I understand that if the cylinder didn't
          pivot, then a more complicated way to valve the cylinder would have
          to come into play. I think I remember that 2 cycle engines have some
          sort of opposed cylinder ports, or something like that. But I just
          remembered they use reed valves on the intake to restrict the
          exhaust I think.
          Oh well, thanks for the explanation! Good luck on the puzzles.

          Lynn Livinston
        • Dave Goodfellow
          Thanks to all who sent me URLs for burr puzzles. It will take me a year to go through them all. I appreciate it. Dave Goodfellow
          Message 4 of 15 , Feb 1, 2004
            Thanks to all who sent me URLs for burr puzzles. It will take me a year
            to go through them all. <g> I appreciate it.
            Dave Goodfellow
          • Tom Benedict
            Lindsay has a book called something like Wonders in Wood . I was going to use some of the ideas in there to make some interlocking metal puzzles. Some of
            Message 5 of 15 , Feb 2, 2004
              Lindsay has a book called something like "Wonders in Wood". I was going
              to use some of the ideas in there to make some interlocking metal puzzles.
              Some of them are way more complicated than anything I've seen in novelty
              stores. Lotsa cool stuff.

              Tom

              On Sat, 31 Jan 2004, Dave Goodfellow wrote:

              > Does anyone know where I might find plans for a puzzle in which you put
              > a number of interlocking pieces together to form a cube? I'd like to
              > make one out of metal.
              >
              > Or any ideas for other projects (not tooling)? I've sort of run out of
              > steam on steam engines (pun intended). I completed one (#14, I think)
              > today, and it's time to change direction for a while. If anyone is
              > interested, it's a 2-cylindeer wobbler with the flywheel mounted between
              > them on a split frame -- 1" bore, 3/4" stroke. Pictures and writeup at
              > --
              >
              > http://www.good-fellow.net/doublewobbler.html
              >
              > Dave Goodfellow
              > Lancaster, CA
              > www.good-fellow.net
              > "No problem too small to baffle this expert"
              >
              >
              >
              > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@...
              >
              > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-unsubscribe@...
              >
              >
              >
              > Let the chips fly!
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              > To visit your group on the web, go to:
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/taigtools/
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > taigtools-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
              > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
            • David Goodfellow
              Thanks Tom, I ll see if I can find it. Dave ... From: Tom Benedict [mailto:benedict@hawaii.rr.com] Sent: Monday, February 02, 2004 11:07 AM To:
              Message 6 of 15 , Feb 2, 2004
                Thanks Tom, I'll see if I can find it.
                Dave

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Tom Benedict [mailto:benedict@...]
                Sent: Monday, February 02, 2004 11:07 AM
                To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [taigtools] Puzzle Plans?


                Lindsay has a book called something like "Wonders in Wood". I was going
                to use some of the ideas in there to make some interlocking metal puzzles.
                Some of them are way more complicated than anything I've seen in novelty
                stores. Lotsa cool stuff.

                Tom

                On Sat, 31 Jan 2004, Dave Goodfellow wrote:

                > Does anyone know where I might find plans for a puzzle in which you put
                > a number of interlocking pieces together to form a cube? I'd like to
                > make one out of metal.
                >
                > Or any ideas for other projects (not tooling)? I've sort of run out of
                > steam on steam engines (pun intended). I completed one (#14, I think)
                > today, and it's time to change direction for a while. If anyone is
                > interested, it's a 2-cylindeer wobbler with the flywheel mounted between
                > them on a split frame -- 1" bore, 3/4" stroke. Pictures and writeup at
                > --
                >
                > http://www.good-fellow.net/doublewobbler.html
                >
                > Dave Goodfellow
                > Lancaster, CA
                > www.good-fellow.net
                > "No problem too small to baffle this expert"
                >
              • Del Stanton
                I have a friend that made a Rubik s Cube out of brass. The individual blocks were about 1/4 inch (6 mm) square and it worked so smoothly ! He did it on a
                Message 7 of 15 , Feb 2, 2004
                  I have a friend that made a Rubik's Cube out of brass. The individual
                  blocks were about 1/4 inch (6 mm) square and it worked so smoothly ! He did
                  it on a manual Sherline Mill.

                  I suppose he disassembled one of the plastic ones to dtermine how to make
                  it.

                  Del Stanton

                  Wannabee Taig CNC Mill Owner

                  _________________________________________________________________
                  Scope out the new MSN Plus Internet Software � optimizes dial-up to the max!
                  http://join.msn.com/?pgmarket=en-us&page=byoa/plus&ST=1
                • Peter Homann
                  That s my sort of Rubik s Cube. Even I could get each side to be the same colour. :-) I d be interested in seeing the internals. I guess the squares for each
                  Message 8 of 15 , Feb 2, 2004
                    That's my sort of Rubik's Cube. Even I could get each side to be the same
                    colour. :-)

                    I'd be interested in seeing the internals. I guess the squares for each side
                    were engraved with a different symbol?

                    Cheers,


                    Peter Homann
                    mailto:Peter.Homann@...
                    Adacel Technologies Limited,
                    250 Bay St, BRIGHTON, 3186, AUSTRALIA
                    http://www.adacel.com <http://www.adacel.com>
                    Telephone +61 (3) 8530 7777, Facsimile +61 (3) 9596 2960
                    Mobile 0421-601 665


                    > -----Original Message-----
                    > From: Del Stanton [mailto:delstanton@...]
                    > Sent: Tuesday, 3 February 2004 4:55 PM
                    > To: taigtools@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: RE: [taigtools] Puzzle Plans?
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > I have a friend that made a Rubik's Cube out of brass. The individual
                    > blocks were about 1/4 inch (6 mm) square and it worked so
                    > smoothly ! He did
                    > it on a manual Sherline Mill.
                    >
                    > I suppose he disassembled one of the plastic ones to dtermine how to make
                    > it.
                    >
                    > Del Stanton
                    >
                    > Wannabee Taig CNC Mill Owner
                    >
                    > _________________________________________________________________
                    > Scope out the new MSN Plus Internet Software — optimizes dial-up
                    > to the max!
                    > http://join.msn.com/?pgmarket=en-us&page=byoa/plus&ST=1
                    >
                    >
                    > To Post a message, send it to: taigtools@...
                    >
                    > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: taigtools-unsubscribe@...
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Let the chips fly!
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                    > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/taigtools/
                    >
                    > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    > taigtools-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
                    > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.