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Re: [Synoptic-L] A Lukan expression in Mark?

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  • Stephen C. Carlson
    ... Although Mark 12:14 looks like one of the places where Griesbach s idea that Mark is a conflation of Matthew and Luke looks good, I don t think and EP
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 11, 2004
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      At 08:44 AM 4/11/2004 -0400, Maluflen@... wrote:
      >Fitzmyer and others who reject the Two Gospel Hypothesis often use the argument that there are no Lukanisms in Mark, which one would expect if Mark wrote with a knowledge of and dependence on Luke. I would argue that the expression EP'ALHQEIAS is characteristically Lukan in the New Testament.
      >
      >1. The genitive ALHQEIAS occurs only three times in Luke and each time, in entirely different contexts, it occurs in the expression EP'ALHQEIAS (Lk 4:25; 20:21; 22:59). In Acts, ALHQEIAS also occurs three times, and in two of the three cases, again in the syntax EP'ALHQEIAS (4:27; 10:34; [cf. 26:25]). So, in five out of six occurrences of the genitive ALHQEIAS in the Lukan writings, the word is found in the expression EP'ALHQEIAS.
      >
      >2. This expression occurs in no other writing of the New Testament except Mark. It's first occurrence in Mark is at 12:14, where the expression is found in the parallel Lukan passage. On the Two Gospel Hypothesis Luke had here changed Matthew's text, which read: KAI THN hODON TOU QEOU EN ALHQEIAi DIDASKEIS, to an expression more idiomatic to himself: ALL'EP'ALHQEIAS THN hODON TOU QEOU DIDASKEIS. Mark picks up this expression from Luke at 12:14, after having preferred the Matthean phrasing earlier in the verse (DIDASKALE, OIDAMEN hOTI ALHTQHS EI..). Mark then reuses the unusual (for the NT) Lukan expression again, perhaps as a literary inclusion, toward the end of this same group of controversy stories (12:32). Otherwise the expression does not occur in Mark. So both occurrences of the expression in Mark can be explained, directly or indirectly, by dependence on the only NT author who uses this expression regularly, or even at all, namely Luke.
      >
      >3. Although not really common in the LXX, the expression could count as a Septuagintalism in Luke's writing. It is found only once in the Torah (Deut 22:20), but occurs more frequently in the writings (Tobit 8:7; Job 7:2; 19:4; 36:4) and prophets (Is37:18; Jer 23:28; Dan 2:5, 5, 9, 47; 8:26). Arguably, Mark derived the expression from Luke, and Luke from the Septuagint or late Jewish usage.
      >
      >I don't know if this particular phenomenon has been noted before, but perhaps Stephen Carlson can provide information about this? My argument here is of course not demonstrative in the strictly logical sense of the term, but it is illustrative of the striking coherency of much linguistic data with the Two-Gospel Hypothesis.

      Although Mark 12:14 looks like one of the places where Griesbach's idea that Mark is
      a conflation of Matthew and Luke looks good, I don't think and EP' ALHQEIAS qualifies
      as a Lukanism though. It is only found three times in Luke, which is too small to count
      (my investigation using the chi-squared statistic needed at least 5/1 instead of 3/1 here).
      Also, EP' ALHQEIAS shows up 257 times in the TLG database, mostly in Koine times,
      so I'd say that EP' ALHQEIAS is just an expression popular in Greek at the time. Luke's
      usage is not so frequent, as a compared to Mark, to make it a Lukanism.

      Stephen Carlson
      --
      Stephen C. Carlson mailto:scarlson@...
      Weblog: http://www.mindspring.com/~scarlson/hypotyposeis/blogger.html
      "Poetry speaks of aspirations, and songs chant the words." Shujing 2.35


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    • Maluflen@aol.com
      In a message dated 4/11/2004 8:05:27 AM Pacific Daylight Time, ... Thanks for the TLG database info, which is really helpful. My argument certainly
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 11, 2004
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        In a message dated 4/11/2004 8:05:27 AM Pacific Daylight Time, scarlson@... writes:


        Also, EP' ALHQEIAS shows up 257 times in the TLG database, mostly in Koine times, so I'd say that EP' ALHQEIAS is just an expression popular in Greek at the time.  Luke's usage is not so frequent, as a compared to Mark, to make it a Lukanism.



        Thanks for the TLG database info, which is really helpful. My argument certainly demonstrates a case where the evidence is compatible with the Two-Gospel Hypothesis, and is even illuminated by it, even if the expression is ruled out on technical grounds as being a "Lukanism". Apart from Mark, Luke is the only NT author who uses the expression EP'ALHQEIAS, and he uses it as many as five times all together. Mark only has the expression in a passage parallel to Luke, and in another passage in the same chapter, where he arguably was looking back to that passage as the beginning of a literary unit consisting of controversy stories. Recall that it is precisely an "unusual" word or expression that is usually regarded as most suitable material for a literary inclusion, and this has to rate as such, given the complete absence of the expression in the remainder of the NT, and in spite of the TLG data.

        Leonard Maluf
        Blessed John XXIII National Seminary
        Weston, MA
      • Tim Reynolds
        on 4/11/04 8:03 AM, Maluflen@aol.com at Maluflen@aol.com wrote: Since NT scholarship has no explanation for the presence of these Hebraisms in Luke (since he
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 11, 2004
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          Re: [Synoptic-L] A Lukan expression in Mark? on 4/11/04 8:03 AM, Maluflen@... at Maluflen@... wrote:

          Since NT scholarship has no explanation for the presence of these
          Hebraisms in Luke (since he is supposedly reliant upon Mark or
          Matthew), "Septuagintalisms" have proven to be a convenient (yet
          unproven) explanation.


          My own statement was slightly more cautious, though. I suggested that the expression came to Luke either "from the Septuagint or late Jewish usage."

          Or from a LXX-steeped informant.  I suggest Mary.

          tim
        • Stephen C. Carlson
          ... The problem is the relative lengths of the texts. Luke is already longer than Mark and adding Acts to the mix makes the Lukan corpus even longer. The
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 11, 2004
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            At 11:46 AM 4/11/2004 -0400, Maluflen@... wrote:
            >In a message dated 4/11/2004 8:05:27 AM Pacific Daylight Time, scarlson@... writes:
            >>Also, EP' ALHQEIAS shows up 257 times in the TLG database, mostly in Koine
            >>times, so I'd say that EP' ALHQEIAS is just an expression popular in Greek
            >>at the time. Luke's usage is not so frequent, as a compared to Mark, to
            >>make it a Lukanism.
            >
            >Thanks for the TLG database info, which is really helpful. My argument
            >certainly demonstrates a case where the evidence is compatible with the
            >Two-Gospel Hypothesis, and is even illuminated by it, even if the expression
            >is ruled out on technical grounds as being a "Lukanism". Apart from Mark,
            >Luke is the only NT author who uses the expression EP'ALHQEIAS, and he uses
            >it as many as five times all together.

            The problem is the relative lengths of the texts. Luke is already
            longer than Mark and adding Acts to the mix makes the Lukan corpus
            even longer. The frequency that Luke-Acts uses the expression has
            to be adjusted for the relative lengths of the corpora. According
            to Morganthaler, Mark (inc. 16:9-20) has 11242 words, while Luke has
            19428 and Acts 18382. Thus, Luke-Acts is almost 2.5 times longer
            than Mark. Crudely, this makes the comparison in terms of lengths
            of text, only one in Mark per 10,000 words to two per 10,0000 words
            of Luke-Acts. Not impressive.

            >Mark only has the expression in a
            >passage parallel to Luke, and in another passage in the same chapter, where
            >he arguably was looking back to that passage as the beginning of a literary
            >unit consisting of controversy stories. Recall that it is precisely an
            >"unusual" word or expression that is usually regarded as most suitable
            >material for a literary inclusion, and this has to rate as such, given the
            >complete absence of the expression in the remainder of the NT, and in spite
            >of the TLG data.

            I don't see anything "unusual" about the expression. It is not
            uncommon in Koine, and restricting the corpus to the NT, though
            easy to do, is artificial. There just isn't even data to justify
            any conclusion. The paucity of evidence makes this case "compatible"
            with any synoptic theory, including the Two-Gospel Hypothesis.

            Here's a list of words I once analyzed that I would consider "Lukan":
            <pre>
            U(POSTRE/FW (0/0/21) Matt-100% Mark-100% Luke+151%
            XA/RIS (0/0/8) Matt-100% Mark- Luke+151%
            FI/LOS (1/0/15) Matt-083% Mark-100% Luke+135%
            *)IEROUSALH/M (2/0/27) Matt-082% Mark-100% Luke+134%
            *ZAXARI/AS (1/0/10) Matt- Mark- Luke+128%
            EU)AGGELI/ZW (1/0/10) Matt- Mark- Luke+128%
            DE/OMAI (1/0/8) Matt- Mark- Luke+123%
            PI/MPLHMI (2/0/13) Matt- Mark-100% Luke+118%
            E)PAI/RW (1/0/6) Matt- Mark- Luke+115%
            NOMIKO/S (1/0/6) Matt- Mark- Luke+115%
            SUNE/XW (1/0/6) Matt- Mark- Luke+115%
            E)/TOS (1/2/15) Matt-085% Mark- Luke+109%
            PARAXRH=MA (2/0/10) Matt- Mark- Luke+109%
            U(PA/RXW (3/0/15) Matt- Mark-100% Luke+109%
            PLH=QOS (0/2/8) Matt-100% Mark- Luke+101%
            QOBE/OMAI (1/1/8) Matt- Mark- Luke+101%
            *MARIA/M (4/0/13) Matt- Mark-100% Luke+092%
            E(/TEROS (10/0/32) Matt- Mark-100% Luke+091%
            TE/ (3/0/9) Matt- Mark- Luke+088%
            EI)RH/NH (4/1/14) Matt- Mark- Luke+085%
            DE/KA (3/1/11) Matt- Mark- Luke+084%
            O(MOI/WS (3/1/11) Matt- Mark- Luke+084%
            R(H=MA (5/2/19) Matt- Mark- Luke+084%
            PLH/N (5/1/15) Matt- Mark-079% Luke+079%
            SU/N (4/6/23) Matt-068% Mark- Luke+075%
            A)NH/R (8/4/27) Matt-045% Mark- Luke+074%
            LAO/S (14/2/36) Matt- Mark-083% Luke+074%
            KLAI/W (2/3/11) Matt-067% Mark- Luke+073%
            E)RWTA/W (4/3/15) Matt- Mark- Luke+071%
            NU=N (4/3/14) Matt- Mark- Luke+067%
            OU)XI/ (9/0/18) Matt- Mark-100% Luke+067%
            *)ABRAA/M (7/1/15) Matt- Mark-081% Luke+064%
            E)GGI/ZW (7/3/18) Matt- Mark- Luke+061%
            POREU/OMAI (29/0/51) Matt- Mark-100% Luke+060%
            A(MARTWLO/S (5/6/18) Matt-054% Mark- Luke+056%
            </pre>

            Stephen Carlson
            --
            Stephen C. Carlson mailto:scarlson@...
            Weblog: http://www.mindspring.com/~scarlson/hypotyposeis/blogger.html
            "Poetry speaks of aspirations, and songs chant the words." Shujing 2.35


            Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
            List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
          • Joseph Weaks
            ... No. Not at all. In fact, this represent a tremendous inadequacy in method. The point of the TLG data reveals that the phrase is common in koine (according
            Message 5 of 10 , Apr 11, 2004
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              On Apr 11, 2004, at 10:46 AM, Maluflen@... wrote:
              > Recall that it is precisely an "unusual" word or expression that is
              > usually regarded as most suitable material for a literary inclusion,
              > and this has to rate as such, given the complete absence of the
              > expression in the remainder of the NT, and in spite of the TLG data.

              No. Not at all. In fact, this represent a tremendous inadequacy in
              method. The point of the TLG data reveals that the phrase is common in
              koine (according to SC; I didn't run the search myself). I'm sure there
              are a tremendous number of words or short phrases that only occur in
              two, independent works.

              Joe Weaks


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            • Maluflen@aol.com
              For Stephen Carlson and Joseph Weaks, I am unable to respond properly to your posts, since I am without access to sources and good emailing capabilities where
              Message 6 of 10 , Apr 13, 2004
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                For Stephen Carlson and Joseph Weaks, I am unable to respond properly to your posts, since I am without access to sources and good emailing capabilities where I am vacationing this week. I will pick up the discussion again when I return, if I have time and/or the inclination. In the meantime, thanks for your comments and contributions.

                Leonard Maluf
                Blessed John XXIII National Seminary
                Weston, MA

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              • Emmanuel Fritsch
                ... Did they once answer the list of lukanisms proposed by Boismard ? Do they address the special case of Egeneto ? a+ manu Synoptic-L Homepage:
                Message 7 of 10 , Apr 14, 2004
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                  Maluflen@... wrote:

                  > Fitzmyer and others who reject the Two Gospel Hypothesis often use the
                  > argument that there are no Lukanisms in Mark,

                  Did they once answer the list of lukanisms proposed by Boismard ?

                  Do they address the special case of "Egeneto" ?

                  a+
                  manu



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