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Re: [Synoptic-L] Luke 1:1 In Retrospect

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  • Stephen C. Carlson
    ... William Strange, THE PROBLEM OF THE TEXT OF ACTS (1992), believes, based on the manuscript evidence of Acts, that the author of Acts died before completing
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 12, 2003
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      At 01:41 AM 12/12/03 -0500, E Bruce Brooks wrote:
      >(1) The probity and even the meaning of Luke 1:1 cannot be fully assessed
      >without considering in parallel Acts 1:1, which refers to it, and reasserts
      >the same authorial position. (2) Acts 1:1 cannot be fully judged, as
      >introducing a continuation of the story told in GLk, without considering the
      >claims of Acts as a whole to be that continuation. (3) Whereas ALk, however
      >numerous his sources, seems to have achieved a literarily homogeneous
      >narrative, the Acts narrative incorporates, grammatically unharmonized, the
      >famous "I-narrative." This implies a different literary procedure, or a
      >different sort of literary skill, and to that extent tends to challenge the
      >assumption that Acts and GLk were written not only by the same person, but
      >in a single authorial impulse at essentially the same time.

      William Strange, THE PROBLEM OF THE TEXT OF ACTS (1992), believes, based
      on the manuscript evidence of Acts, that the author of Acts died before
      completing his revision of Acts' first draft and that Acts was later
      published posthumously. If Strange's idea is correct, then that may
      be an alternative explanation for the non-homogeneity of Acts compared
      with Luke.

      >Such considerations might lead to the suggestion that the various 20c
      >efforts to test the stylistic compatibility of GLk and the several
      >(internally defined) segments of Acts might now be reviewed, as background
      >for the Luke 1:1 question. Would any knowledgeable person here present care
      >to undertake such a review?

      Hawkins, HORAE SYNOPTICAE (1899; 2d ed. 1909), addressed this issue on
      philological grounds as have several others, mostly in the early 20th
      century. A good commentary on Luke or Acts should reference the discussion.

      >I was reminded of these considerations by the recent occurrence of Alan
      >Turing Day (2nd Tuesday in December; this year, 9 Dec), which in my part of
      >the world is celebrated as part of the Festival Calendar of Philology, in
      >recognition of the important if still not fully realized contribution to
      >literary studies which was made by Turing and other wizards of Bletchley
      >Park.

      I'm familiar with Turing's contributions to computer science. What did
      he do for philology?

      Stephen Carlson
      --
      Stephen C. Carlson mailto:scarlson@...
      Weblog: http://www.mindspring.com/~scarlson/hypotyposeis/blogger.html
      "Poetry speaks of aspirations, and songs chant the words." Shujing 2.35

      Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
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