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[Synoptic-L] A paradox in the sayings source

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  • Ron Price
    I ve been delving deeper into the word usage of sQ (a sayings source based on the 3ST), and have found that by adding a few extra Matthean verses I can
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 1, 2003
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      I've been delving deeper into the word usage of sQ (a sayings source
      based on the 3ST), and have found that by adding a few extra Matthean
      verses I can (paradoxically) achieve a sayings source which is more
      distinct from Matthew.
      The best way to explain this is by an example. I had already
      designated 'Good tree' (Mt 7:16-20 // Lk 6:43-44) as an sQ saying.
      Suppose that this sQ saying had also contained the previous Matthean
      verse: "Beware of false prophets, who come to you in sheep's clothing
      but inside are ravenous wolves". The "false prophets" (also Mt
      24:11,24), "inside" (also Mt 23:25,27,28) and "wolves" (also Mt 10:16)
      become peculiar to sQ, i.e. only in Matthew where he has derived them
      from sQ (directly or via Mark). Thus sQ becomes more distinct from
      Matthew in its word usage. One can reasonably deduce on this basis that
      Mt 7:15 probably came from sQ .

      The net result of this and other cases is that I now have 20 different
      stylistic features which are common to at least 3 sayings, yet not
      present in Matthew except where he is getting the text from one of his
      two written sources . Also 14 distinct word usages common to 2 sayings.
      All this whilst retaining a crystal clear structure for the source.
      Consequently it is becoming increasingly clear that sQ had a style
      which is remarkably distinct from that of Matthew. This contrasts with Q
      which, as recent stylistic analysis has shown, cannot be distinguished
      from Matthew.
      Yet at the same time, sQ is becoming more Matthean because its text is
      becoming more indebted to Matthew relative to Luke. This exposes even
      more the IQP's Lucan bias. (By the way, I *like* Luke better than
      Matthew, but this preference has to be put to one side when trying to
      adopt the role of a neutral historian and delving into what was clearly
      a Jewish source, albeit a Christian Jewish source.)

      Ron Price

      Weston-on-Trent, Derby, UK

      e-mail: ron.price@...

      Web site: http://homepage.virgin.net/ron.price/index.htm

      Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
      List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
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