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[Synoptic-L] Renaissance in Synoptic Problem studies?

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  • Mark Goodacre
    I ve been wondering over the last few days whether we might almost suspect that we are at the beginning of a renaissance in the study of the Synoptic Problem.
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 10, 2003
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      I've been wondering over the last few days whether we might almost
      suspect that we are at the beginning of a renaissance in the study of
      the Synoptic Problem. Just look at recent books on the Synoptic
      Problem -- the last couple of years have seen a real resurgence of
      interest: Kloppenborg's Excavating Q (2001), which has two detailed
      chapters on the Synoptic Problem; my Synoptic Problem: A Way Through
      the Maze (2001) and Case Against Q (2002), Peabody et al's One Gospel
      From Two (2002), David Neville's Mark's Gospel: Prior or Posterior
      (2002), Black et al's Rethinking the Synoptic Problem (2001), and
      Shellard's New Light on Luke (2002). Forthcoming is Derrenbacker's
      Ancient Compostional Practices and the Synoptic Problem and no doubt
      others. This is in addition to many articles, conference sessions
      devoted to discussion of the issue, this list. I can't think of
      other such short periods of time when we have had such a flurry of
      activity on the Synoptic Problem. Interesting, isn't it?

      Mark
      -----------------------------
      Dr Mark Goodacre mailto:M.S.Goodacre@...
      Dept of Theology tel: +44 121 414 7512
      University of Birmingham fax: +44 121 414 4381
      Birmingham B15 2TT UK

      http://www.theology.bham.ac.uk/goodacre
      http://NTGateway.com


      Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
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    • Zeba Crook
      Mark, Add to this a 2001 Duke dissertation by Stephen Hultgren that I am reviewing for CBQ: Stephen Hultgren, _Narrative Elements in the Double Tradition: A
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 10, 2003
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        Mark,

        Add to this a 2001 Duke dissertation by Stephen Hultgren that I am
        reviewing for CBQ:

        Stephen Hultgren, _Narrative Elements in the Double Tradition: A Study of
        Their Place within the Framework of the Gospel Narrative_ (Berlin: de
        Gruyter, 2002).

        And W.E. Arnal's _Jesus and the Village Scribes_ (on the setting and
        rhetoric of Q)

        And there's all the IQP stuff (DocQ, Critical Edition, Sayings Gospel in
        Gk/Eng), the synoptic concordance.

        Might this be simply a matter of the fact that like a family tree, each
        generation of scholars produces more scholars: Goulder begat Goodacre;
        Kloppenborg begat Kirk, Derrenbacker, and Crook; Farmer begat . . . ? I
        agree, it is interesting and exciting.

        Zeb


        Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
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      • John C. Poirier
        It seems to me that Kloppenborg s interest in the Synoptic Problem is key: the fact that someone who is as intensely interested in Q as Kloppenborg should also
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 10, 2003
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          It seems to me that Kloppenborg's interest in the Synoptic Problem is
          key: the fact that someone who is as intensely interested in Q as
          Kloppenborg should also regard the Synoptic Problem as a valid topic for
          discussion is a very welcome departure from the way in which North
          American Q scholars used to conduct business.

          We might be at such a turning point, but it will depend on how successful
          we are at bringing the field of New Testament Introduction up to date.
          So far, that field has been content to operate with an understanding of
          the Synoptic Problem that is over fifty years behind the times. We need
          more books like *The Case Against Q*, and we also need to find ways to
          reach the folks who are writing NT introductions (so that perhaps they
          will correct their errors for revised editions). (After Bart Ehrman
          released his *The New Testament*, I wrote him [as a former student] and
          pointed out the errors in his treatment of the Synoptic Problem--most
          egregiously, that the argument from order is logically flawed, as
          everyone working in the field has known at least since Butler. This did
          no good: although Ehrman made changes to other parts of his book for its
          second edition, he left the discussion of the Synoptic Problem
          untouched.)

          I think someone needs to write a history of the Synoptic Problem, or at
          least a "state of the question." Or how about a *Semeia* volume on "The
          Synoptic Problem Today"? In addition to the sorts of highly detailed
          studies that help us to understand the Synoptic Problem, we also need
          these sorts of less insular publications (which can be highly detailed in
          the footnotes, if the author likes).


          John C. Poirier
          Middletown, Ohio


          Mark Goodacre wrote:

          > I've been wondering over the last few days whether we might almost
          > suspect that we are at the beginning of a renaissance in the study of
          > the Synoptic Problem. Just look at recent books on the Synoptic
          > Problem -- the last couple of years have seen a real resurgence of
          > interest: Kloppenborg's Excavating Q (2001), which has two detailed
          > chapters on the Synoptic Problem; my Synoptic Problem: A Way Through
          > the Maze (2001) and Case Against Q (2002), Peabody et al's One Gospel
          > >From Two (2002), David Neville's Mark's Gospel: Prior or Posterior
          > (2002), Black et al's Rethinking the Synoptic Problem (2001), and
          > Shellard's New Light on Luke (2002). Forthcoming is Derrenbacker's
          > Ancient Compostional Practices and the Synoptic Problem and no doubt
          > others. This is in addition to many articles, conference sessions
          > devoted to discussion of the issue, this list. I can't think of
          > other such short periods of time when we have had such a flurry of
          > activity on the Synoptic Problem. Interesting, isn't it?
          >
          > Mark
          > -----------------------------
          > Dr Mark Goodacre mailto:M.S.Goodacre@...
          > Dept of Theology tel: +44 121 414 7512
          > University of Birmingham fax: +44 121 414 4381
          > Birmingham B15 2TT UK
          >
          > http://www.theology.bham.ac.uk/goodacre
          > http://NTGateway.com
          >
          > Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
          > List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...


          Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
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