Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [Synoptic-L] "Minor agreements" in de Solages

Expand Messages
  • John C. Poirier
    Emmanuel, Thanks for the interesting remarks about Solages. They will be helpful. As Solages is apparently the first one to do a full-length statistical
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 6, 2002
      Emmanuel,

      Thanks for the interesting remarks about Solages. They will be helpful. As
      Solages is apparently the first one to do a full-length statistical study of
      patterns of agreement, it is not expected that his analysis will be as strong
      as later analyses, but I had trouble discerning what parts of Solages's
      shortcomings are owed to his own situation, and what parts are owed to his
      aims.

      Emmanuel Fritsch wrote:

      > At the core of synoptic problem, Solages gave a strange observation
      > about triple tradition, and I would like to get some precision from
      > those one (John?) that read his other books : he give the number of
      > triple tradition pericopae that appear in the same order in the three
      > synoptic, the numbers of pericopae that appear in the same order in
      > each pear of gospels and not in the third, (Mark and Matthew and not
      > Luke, Luke and Mark and not Matthew, etc.) and the number of pericopae
      > whose order differs in the three synoptics.
      >
      > the result is :
      > * constant order in synoptic : 43 (68)
      > * Mark+Matthew : 14 (22)
      > * Mark+Luke : 14 (15)
      > * Luke+Matthew : 0 (0)
      > * no common order : 2 (2)
      >
      > the second number is computed on the whole gospel. The first one, is
      > presented as more representative, since computed without beginning
      > and end of the gospel (Mk 1:1-20 and 14:1-16:8).
      >
      > The strange phenomenon is naturally the 0 connexion between Luke and
      > Matthew, that Solages presents as an evidence for a no connexion
      > dependency between Mark and Matthew. (There are possible objection
      > against such a conclusion, I know, and do not want to discuss it)
      >
      > Solages gives no precision about his computation, and I would like
      > to know how he defines this order, and computes the pericopae.
      >
      > And also : is it a discovery from him, or is it a well known phenomenon ?

      The figures that you cite are found on p. 18 of Bruno de Solages, *La
      Composition des Evangiles* (1973). They appear to be a revision of his
      earlier figures. E.g., in his 1959 work, he writes simply that Luke's,
      Mark's, and Matthew's orders agree "in an overwhelming majority of cases,"
      that, apart from these triple agreements, Mark and Matthew agree 13 times
      within the triple tradition, Mark and Luke agree 17 times, and Luke and
      Matthew never agree.

      Unless I am missing some subtle aspect to Solages's description of this
      phenomenon, this is simply one form of the "argument from order." It proves
      that Mark is the middle term. Solages seems to be aware that "middle term"
      allows more than one stemma, but he narrows the choices down, esp. through an
      argument about doublets.

      Solages's charts showing the order of the synoptic gospels are hard to read.
      Morgenthaler writes, "Auch die Tafeln S 1089 bis 1105 sind optisch blind und
      daru Barrs Darstellung weit unterlegen" (*Statistische Synopse*, p. 25).


      John C. Poirier
      Middletown, Ohio




      Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
      List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.