Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Synoptic-L] Speculation on 3SH, 200 and 202

Expand Messages
  • dgentil@sears.com
    Well, first let me say I think the FH is not ruled out by the results, but I do think the version of the 3SH I described is more likely than the FH on a couple
    Message 1 of 19 , Feb 20, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Well, first let me say I think the FH is not ruled out by the results, but
      I do think the version of the
      3SH I described is more likely than the FH on a couple of points based on
      the results.

      First, I doubt that genre is a very large factor, and I do think it would
      have to be a large factor for the separation between the 211 group and 200
      group we observe to be called expected. But since I can't demonstrate that
      genre is of relatively minor importance, let's assume genre is a large
      factor for now. What might we expect on the FH and 3SH?

      One difference is the behavior of 102-002.
      On the FH 102 is written by Luke and mostly sayings.
      002 is written by Luke and partly sayings.
      We would expect a relation here, but find none.
      Compare this to 200-201 and 200-202 where 201/202 are mostly sayings, and
      200 is only partly sayings, and we see a relation. On the other hand, on
      the 3SH 102 is mostly Q, so we would expect it to group with 202, and not
      much with Luke.
      So whether genre is important or not, the 3SH does better here.

      The connection between 102-202 is quite natural on the 3SH. They are both
      mostly Q.
      On the FH we note that while 102 does connect to 202,
      it does not connect to 200 or 201, so besides genre we have to add that 102
      looks in particular like 202 because 202 contains "favored" words. Also 102
      has about the same connection to 202 as 201 does to 202. While genre might
      push 102 and 202 together, they should still be farther apart than 202-201
      on the FH. On the 3SH "about equal" is what we expect. So again the 3SH
      does better.

      I think the implications of the study for the FH are mixed. 212-211 and
      200-202 are certainly a big positives,
      but the behavior of 102 seems to be a negative.

      Dave Gentile
      Riverside, Illinois
      M.S. Physics
      Ph.D. Management Science candidate












      On 20 Feb 2002 at 10:22, dgentil@... wrote:

      > The only thing that bothers me a little is that if 202/200 was at
      > least in substantial part from Matthew, we might expect to see more of
      > a connection to the 211 group. The only connection is a
      > non-significant one between 201 and 211.
      >
      > However, if 202/200 is mostly the sayings source, and it had a very
      > distinct style, the lack of connection to the Matthew group, might be
      > expected.

      Could this be an occasion where we need to remember genre issues
      alongside source issues? I'd actually have expected to see results
      like this on the Farrer theory, for example, given the preponderance
      of sayings material in both 202 and 200. One would expect some
      distance from the triple tradition material, which has a
      preponderance of narrative.

      > What I'm looking for here, is the solution that is most probable based
      > on the results. Rather that trying to say certain possibilities are
      > eliminated, I'd rather say the results support certain types of
      > solutions over others. Currently I'd say the simplest solution that is
      > a candidate for the "most likely" is the 3SH with the 4th document
      > containing something like an sQ & a lot of 200 as well.

      Or is the simplest solution Farrer, once we've granted that the genre
      issues we were expecting to turn up have turned up?

      Mark
      -----------------------------
      Dr Mark Goodacre mailto:M.S.Goodacre@...
      Dept of Theology tel: +44 121 414 7512
      University of Birmingham fax: +44 121 414 4381
      Birmingham B15 2TT UK





      Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
      List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
    • Stephen C. Carlson
      ... The interesting thing about the saying material is that it is one part of the gospels that the evangelists present as not their own words. Rather, the
      Message 2 of 19 , Feb 20, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        At 09:14 PM 2/20/2002 -0000, Mark Goodacre wrote:
        >Could this be an occasion where we need to remember genre issues
        >alongside source issues? I'd actually have expected to see results
        >like this on the Farrer theory, for example, given the preponderance
        >of sayings material in both 202 and 200. One would expect some
        >distance from the triple tradition material, which has a
        >preponderance of narrative.

        The interesting thing about the saying material is that it is
        one part of the gospels that the evangelists present as not their
        own words. Rather, the saying material is presented as Jesus's
        words. Unless Goulder is correct that many of the sayings are
        the evangelists' own creation, we should not expect the sayings
        to have the same style as the surrounding narrative.

        Perhaps the commonality behind the 202-102 connection is
        simply oral tradition. Where Luke deviates from Matthew's
        version of the sayings, Luke follows oral tradition instead,
        which is Matthew's source.

        The reason why the 200-202 is there is due to oral tradition
        rather than Matthean creation. The reason why the 202-002 is
        not there is due to the large amount of narrative material
        in Luke 1-2, which would obliterate the commonality effects
        with Luke's special saying material (alternatively, attest
        to Luke's creation of some of the L material).

        Perhaps we could test these ideas by looking at which words
        are responsible for the connection.

        Stephen Carlson
        --
        Stephen C. Carlson mailto:scarlson@...
        Synoptic Problem Home Page http://www.mindspring.com/~scarlson/synopt/
        "Poetry speaks of aspirations, and songs chant the words." Shujing 2.35


        Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
        List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
      • Horace Jeffery Hodges
        ... Farrer ... This is an interesting point. Would it imply conservatism in the early church concerning sayings attributed to Jesus? Or: Would it imply use of
        Message 3 of 19 , Feb 20, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          Mark Goodacre wrote:

          > >Could this be an occasion where we need to remember
          > >genre issues alongside source issues? I'd actually
          > >have expected to see results like this on the
          Farrer
          > >theory, for example, given the preponderance of
          > >sayings material in both 202 and 200. One would
          > >expect some distance from the triple tradition
          > >material, which has a preponderance of narrative.

          Stephen C. Carlson replied:

          > The interesting thing about the saying material is
          > that it is one part of the gospels that the
          > evangelists present as not their own words. Rather,
          > the saying material is presented as Jesus's words.

          This is an interesting point.

          Would it imply conservatism in the early church
          concerning sayings attributed to Jesus?

          Or:

          Would it imply use of the same oral tradition about
          Jesus's sayings?

          Also, would it be possible to use Dave's statistical
          approach to compare this style mentioned above to the
          style of sayings attributed to Jesus in other NT
          writings? Or what about Jesus's sayings in "The Gospel
          of Thomas"?

          Jeffery Hodges

          =====
          Assistant Professor Horace Jeffery Hodges
          Hanshin University (Korean Theological University)
          447-791 Kyunggido Osan-City
          Yangsandong 411
          South Korea

          __________________________________________________
          Do You Yahoo!?
          Yahoo! Sports - Coverage of the 2002 Olympic Games
          http://sports.yahoo.com

          Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
          List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
        • Stephen C. Carlson
          ... I thought about this, but the problem is that the bulk of Thomas is preserved only in Coptic and Dave s method requires Greek words. Stephen Carlson --
          Message 4 of 19 , Feb 20, 2002
          • 0 Attachment
            At 09:28 PM 2/20/2002 -0800, Horace Jeffery Hodges wrote:
            >Also, would it be possible to use Dave's statistical
            >approach to compare this style mentioned above to the
            >style of sayings attributed to Jesus in other NT
            >writings? Or what about Jesus's sayings in "The Gospel
            >of Thomas"?

            I thought about this, but the problem is that the
            bulk of Thomas is preserved only in Coptic and
            Dave's method requires Greek words.

            Stephen Carlson
            --
            Stephen C. Carlson mailto:scarlson@...
            Synoptic Problem Home Page http://www.mindspring.com/~scarlson/synopt/
            "Poetry speaks of aspirations, and songs chant the words." Shujing 2.35


            Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
            List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
          • Horace Jeffery Hodges
            ... mentioned ... in ... Yes ... I suppose that this does pose a problem. One might want to take a look anyway since Christian Coptic uses a great number of
            Message 5 of 19 , Feb 20, 2002
            • 0 Attachment
              I asked:

              > >Also, would it be possible to use Dave's
              > >statistical approach to compare this style
              mentioned
              > >above to the style of sayings attributed to Jesus
              in
              > >... "The Gospel of Thomas"?

              Stephen C. Carlson replied:

              > I thought about this, but the problem is that the
              > bulk of Thomas is preserved only in Coptic and
              > Dave's method requires Greek words.

              Yes ... I suppose that this does pose a problem.

              One might want to take a look anyway since Christian
              Coptic uses a great number of Greek words and might
              follow fairly closely the Greek text being translated.

              Has anyone checked the Greek fragments and the Coptic
              version of "Thomas" to see about the degree to which
              the Greek is carried over? (I well imagine that
              someone has done this.)

              Jeffery Hodges

              =====
              Assistant Professor Horace Jeffery Hodges
              Hanshin University (Korean Theological University)
              447-791 Kyunggido Osan-City
              Yangsandong 411
              South Korea

              __________________________________________________
              Do You Yahoo!?
              Yahoo! Sports - Coverage of the 2002 Olympic Games
              http://sports.yahoo.com

              Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
              List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
            • dgentil@sears.com
              I think working with the Coptic Thomas would probably not be very useful. Some of the more dramatic signature differances, are when one author uses word A,
              Message 6 of 19 , Feb 21, 2002
              • 0 Attachment
                I think working with the Coptic Thomas would probably not be very useful.
                Some of the more dramatic "signature" differances, are when one author
                uses word A, and another uses B, and A and B are near synonyms.
                It might be difficult to tell from the Coptic which Greek word underlies
                it.
                Still, it would be interesting to see if anything could be learned from it.
                The few Greek fragments might be able to give small hints too.

                Dave Gentile
                Riverside, Illinois
                M.S. Physics
                Ph.D. Management Science candidate




                I asked:

                > >Also, would it be possible to use Dave's
                > >statistical approach to compare this style
                mentioned
                > >above to the style of sayings attributed to Jesus
                in
                > >... "The Gospel of Thomas"?

                Stephen C. Carlson replied:

                > I thought about this, but the problem is that the
                > bulk of Thomas is preserved only in Coptic and
                > Dave's method requires Greek words.

                Yes ... I suppose that this does pose a problem.

                One might want to take a look anyway since Christian
                Coptic uses a great number of Greek words and might
                follow fairly closely the Greek text being translated.

                Has anyone checked the Greek fragments and the Coptic
                version of "Thomas" to see about the degree to which
                the Greek is carried over? (I well imagine that
                someone has done this.)

                Jeffery Hodges






                Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
                List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
              • Ron Price
                Dave, Thanks for the explanation. ... If this is a distinct group, it looks more like Matthean redaction . It surely can t be labelled Matthew if it
                Message 7 of 19 , Feb 21, 2002
                • 0 Attachment
                  Dave,
                  Thanks for the explanation.

                  >212-211-210 I'm identifying as Matthew.

                  If this is a distinct group, it looks more like 'Matthean redaction'.
                  It surely can't be labelled 'Matthew' if it excludes 200.

                  >200-201-202-102 I'm identifying as the 4th document.

                  Perhaps this is a mixture of Matthew and the sayings source, though
                  why these should be grouped together I have no idea. Certainly if 200
                  correlates with 102, then I can offer no explanation, for I wouldn't
                  expect them to be at all similar.

                  Ron Price

                  Weston-on-Trent, Derby, UK

                  e-mail: ron.price@...

                  Web site: http://homepage.virgin.net/ron.price/index.htm

                  Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
                  List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
                • dgentil@sears.com
                  ... If this is a distinct group, it looks more like Matthean redaction . It surely can t be labelled Matthew if it excludes 200. ======== Dave: Sure it
                  Message 8 of 19 , Feb 21, 2002
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Ron Price wrote:

                    >212-211-210 I'm identifying as Matthew.

                    If this is a distinct group, it looks more like 'Matthean redaction'.
                    It surely can't be labelled 'Matthew' if it excludes 200.

                    ========

                    Dave:

                    Sure it could, if Matthew was dependant on a source for 200, and wrote
                    211-210-212 himself.

                    ========

                    Ron:

                    >200-201-202-102 I'm identifying as the 4th document.

                    Perhaps this is a mixture of Matthew and the sayings source, though
                    why these should be grouped together I have no idea. Certainly if 200
                    correlates with 102, then I can offer no explanation, for I wouldn't
                    expect them to be at all similar.

                    ========

                    Dave:

                    202 is very closely related to 200, and less related to 201 and 102.
                    201-200 is also a strong relation. 200-102 does not show a relation.

                    I do see the group 200-201-202-102 as mostly saying source, and partly
                    Matthew. (and 102 as a small part Luke)
                    That's why I'm placing a large amount of 200 in the sayings source.
                    Although I doubt Matthew 1 and 2 belong in it.

                    Dave Gentile
                    Riverside, Illinois
                    M.S. Physics
                    Ph.D. Management Science candidate





                    Dave,
                    Thanks for the explanation.

                    >212-211-210 I'm identifying as Matthew.

                    If this is a distinct group, it looks more like 'Matthean redaction'.
                    It surely can't be labelled 'Matthew' if it excludes 200.

                    >200-201-202-102 I'm identifying as the 4th document.

                    Perhaps this is a mixture of Matthew and the sayings source, though
                    why these should be grouped together I have no idea. Certainly if 200
                    correlates with 102, then I can offer no explanation, for I wouldn't
                    expect them to be at all similar.

                    Ron Price





                    Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
                    List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
                  • dgentil@sears.com
                    Basically, what you describe sounds like oral tradition playing the same role that I m speculating the sayings source played. I suppose a strong oral tradition
                    Message 9 of 19 , Feb 21, 2002
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Basically, what you describe sounds like oral tradition playing the same
                      role that I'm speculating the sayings
                      source played. I suppose a strong oral tradition and a written source would
                      be virtually indistinguishable.

                      The argument I've seen for Q being a document is the correlation in order
                      between Luke and Matthew,
                      but if Luke knew Matthew I don't think we could use that argument. So, it
                      may be very difficult to distinguish
                      between an oral and written source.

                      I agree that looking at the individual words, in detail, is a good idea.

                      Dave Gentile
                      Riverside, Illinois
                      M.S. Physics
                      Ph.D. Management Science candidate







                      The interesting thing about the saying material is that it is
                      one part of the gospels that the evangelists present as not their
                      own words. Rather, the saying material is presented as Jesus's
                      words. Unless Goulder is correct that many of the sayings are
                      the evangelists' own creation, we should not expect the sayings
                      to have the same style as the surrounding narrative.

                      Perhaps the commonality behind the 202-102 connection is
                      simply oral tradition. Where Luke deviates from Matthew's
                      version of the sayings, Luke follows oral tradition instead,
                      which is Matthew's source.

                      The reason why the 200-202 is there is due to oral tradition
                      rather than Matthean creation. The reason why the 202-002 is
                      not there is due to the large amount of narrative material
                      in Luke 1-2, which would obliterate the commonality effects
                      with Luke's special saying material (alternatively, attest
                      to Luke's creation of some of the L material).

                      Perhaps we could test these ideas by looking at which words
                      are responsible for the connection.

                      Stephen Carlson




                      Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
                      List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
                    • Brian E. Wilson
                      Dear List Readers, I m posting now after many years of silently enjoying observing the list. My father, who has been coping with cancer for many years, has now
                      Message 10 of 19 , Feb 21, 2002
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Dear List Readers,

                        I'm posting now after many years of silently enjoying observing the
                        list. My father, who has been coping with cancer for many years, has now
                        been diagnosed with a new terminal secondary cancer. He is still reading
                        printouts of these messages in hospital and, when he has the energy, he
                        dictates replies with his usual vigour.

                        However, the illness is likely to take him away from this list and the
                        more physical world in the all too near future. In the meantime, I'll
                        post what he manages to express.

                        I would personally like to thank you all for being such a rich part of
                        his life, and particularly the moderators for having made this possible.
                        I won't put words into my father's keyboard, but I suspect he would see
                        the above as a gross understatement.

                        --
                        Peter Wilson

                        Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
                        List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
                      • Horace Jeffery Hodges
                        ... author ... the ... What I meant was that the Coptic text might contain enough Greek words to enable an analysis. Christian Coptic texts have very many
                        Message 11 of 19 , Feb 21, 2002
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Dave Gentile wrote:

                          > I think working with the Coptic Thomas would
                          > probably not be very useful. Some of the more
                          > dramatic "signature" differances, are when one
                          author
                          > uses word A, and another uses B, and A and B are
                          > near synonyms. It might be difficult to tell from
                          the
                          > Coptic which Greek word underlies it.

                          What I meant was that the Coptic text might contain
                          enough Greek words to enable an analysis. Christian
                          Coptic texts have very many Greek words, and the Copt
                          translating "The Gospel of Thomas" might have simply
                          retained a great number of the Greek terms.

                          Still, you're probably right -- just wishful thinking
                          on my part. The reason that I suggested this was that
                          "The Gospel of Thomas" gives the strong impression of
                          drawing from a sayings source that has elements in
                          common with the Synoptic Gospels even though the
                          sayings differ in interesting ways.

                          > Still, it would be interesting to see if anything
                          > could be learned from it. The few Greek fragments
                          > might be able to give small hints too.

                          I think that this would be well worth attempting.

                          Jeffery Hodges

                          =====
                          Assistant Professor Horace Jeffery Hodges
                          Hanshin University (Korean Theological University)
                          447-791 Kyunggido Osan-City
                          Yangsandong 411
                          South Korea

                          __________________________________________________
                          Do You Yahoo!?
                          Yahoo! Sports - Coverage of the 2002 Olympic Games
                          http://sports.yahoo.com

                          Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
                          List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
                        • dgentil@sears.com
                          I think Thomas is very interesting too. I m most familiar with Stephen Patterson s work on it. Does anyone happen to know how many Greek words we have from the
                          Message 12 of 19 , Feb 22, 2002
                          • 0 Attachment
                            I think Thomas is very interesting too. I'm most familiar with Stephen
                            Patterson's work on it.

                            Does anyone happen to know how many Greek words we have from the fragments?
                            I'm not sure if I have anything with the Greek fragments in it. I know I've
                            got a book with the Coptic text.

                            Another interesting thing to do would be to see how the Thomas parallels in
                            Mark compare
                            to other Thomas parallels in the synoptics, to Mark in general, and to 202
                            in general.

                            Dave Gentile
                            Riverside, Illinois
                            M.S. Physics
                            Ph.D. Management Science candidate





                            Still, you're probably right -- just wishful thinking
                            on my part. The reason that I suggested this was that
                            "The Gospel of Thomas" gives the strong impression of
                            drawing from a sayings source that has elements in
                            common with the Synoptic Gospels even though the
                            sayings differ in interesting ways.

                            > Still, it would be interesting to see if anything
                            > could be learned from it. The few Greek fragments
                            > might be able to give small hints too.

                            I think that this would be well worth attempting.

                            Jeffery Hodges





                            Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
                            List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
                          • Brian E. Wilson
                            Many thanks for the personal notes that were sent. My father understood and enjoyed them when I read them to him on his final evening yesterday. Once again,
                            Message 13 of 19 , Feb 23, 2002
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Many thanks for the personal notes that were sent. My father understood
                              and enjoyed them when I read them to him on his final evening yesterday.

                              Once again, thank you all for enriching his life.

                              Peter.

                              In message <hPwF9MABdWd8EwlC@...>, Brian E. Wilson
                              <brian@...> writes
                              >
                              >Dear List Readers,
                              >
                              >I'm posting now after many years of silently enjoying observing the
                              >list. My father, who has been coping with cancer for many years, has now
                              >been diagnosed with a new terminal secondary cancer. He is still reading
                              >printouts of these messages in hospital and, when he has the energy, he
                              >dictates replies with his usual vigour.
                              >
                              >However, the illness is likely to take him away from this list and the
                              >more physical world in the all too near future. In the meantime, I'll
                              >post what he manages to express.
                              >
                              >I would personally like to thank you all for being such a rich part of
                              >his life, and particularly the moderators for having made this possible.
                              >I won't put words into my father's keyboard, but I suspect he would see
                              >the above as a gross understatement.
                              >


                              Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
                              List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
                            • Stephen C. Carlson
                              Like many of you on Synoptic-L, I have been saddened from the news of Brian E. Wilson s passing. As many of you know, Brian has one of the regulars of
                              Message 14 of 19 , Feb 23, 2002
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Like many of you on Synoptic-L, I have been saddened
                                from the news of Brian E. Wilson's passing. As many of
                                you know, Brian has one of the regulars of Synoptic-L
                                from the very beginning. This message is a brief
                                appreciation of an extraordinary mind.

                                I have never met Brian in person and I only know him from
                                his on-line presense. I first interacted with Brian in 1996,
                                almost 6 years ago, in a discussion of his Two Notebook
                                Hypothesis. Although I had been studying the synoptic problem
                                for quite some time, I thought I had encountered every
                                possible theory and variation. Not so with Brian. Brian
                                had the rare ability to think outside the box and come
                                up with solutions that are both novel and non-obvious to
                                the ordinary researchers in the field.

                                A case in point is the Two Notebook Hypothesis, in which Brian
                                postulated that each of the authors of the synoptic gospels
                                independently combined two related notebooks. Even though
                                dozens of differnt synoptic theories have been proposed over
                                the past 200 years, Brian was able to formulate a solution
                                that was strikingly different from those of his predecessors and
                                still managed to be viable. Brian later simplified his theory
                                into the present Greek Notes Hypothesis, in which all three
                                gospels are derived from a translated notebook that was prone
                                to redundancies.

                                Brian's argument for the singularity of authorship behind the
                                Greek Notes Hypothesis was ingenious: he looked for an authorial
                                fingerprint that he felt could only have come from a single
                                mind. What is amazing about this line of argument is that he
                                was able to connect a wide-ranging set of phenomena that people
                                thought were unrelated and fashion a common explanation for them.
                                These include: the nomina sacra, the use of Greek numerals (ciphers
                                as he called them), the adoption of the codex as the preferred
                                Christian medium, and the use of Aramaic in the gospels. Although
                                Brian's theses and arguments have not yet been adopted by other
                                scholars, it is important to point out that David Trobisch has
                                appealed to much of the same evidence and has used a similar
                                argument to support Trobisch's idea that the New Testament was
                                published in a 2d century edition.

                                Another memorable aspect of Brian was his initiative. Even
                                though Brian was not a salaried professor, he nonetheless managed
                                to publish articles in peer-reviewed journals and present papers
                                at international congresses. He demonstrated that the field of New
                                Testament studies is not a guild for insiders only but that articles
                                and papers are accepted on the basis of merit instead of professional
                                position.

                                For these and other reasons, I am thankful for Brian's accomplishments
                                and saddened at his passing.

                                Stephen Carlson
                                --
                                Stephen C. Carlson mailto:scarlson@...
                                Synoptic Problem Home Page http://www.mindspring.com/~scarlson/synopt/
                                "Poetry speaks of aspirations, and songs chant the words." Shujing 2.35


                                Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
                                List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
                              • Thomas R. W. Longstaff
                                ... I will add my voice to those who are saddened by the news of Brian s death. As others have noted, he was a valued participant in Synoptic-L from its
                                Message 15 of 19 , Feb 25, 2002
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  At 12:17 AM 2/24/2002 -0500, Stephen C. Carlson wrote:

                                  >Like many of you on Synoptic-L, I have been saddened
                                  >from the news of Brian E. Wilson's passing. As many of
                                  >you know, Brian has one of the regulars of Synoptic-L
                                  >from the very beginning. This message is a brief
                                  >appreciation of an extraordinary mind.

                                  I will add my voice to those who are saddened by the news of
                                  Brian's death. As others have noted, he was a valued participant
                                  in Synoptic-L from its beginning. His contributions to the list
                                  were highly valued. We will all miss his postings and keep
                                  him - and those close to him - in our thoughts and prayers.


                                  Dr. Thomas R. W. Longstaff
                                  Crawford Family Professor of Religious Studies
                                  Director, Jewish Studies
                                  Colby College
                                  4643 Mayflower Hill
                                  Waterville, ME 04901
                                  Telephone: (207) 872-3150
                                  FAX: (207) 872-3802
                                  Email: tlongst@...


                                  Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
                                  List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
                                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.