Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Use of IHSOUS (was Re: [Synoptic-L] More Excel results)

Expand Messages
  • David Inglis
    ... Brian, This sounds perfectly plausible, and if true then we should still see this when we look at all the data. Here s the full set of numbers for
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 24, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Brian Wilson wrote:


      > Dave Inglis wroe --
      > >
      > >Looking at the scatter diagrams it is clear that IHSOUS is responsible
      > >for much of the positive correlation between 211 and 221, and we could
      > >well be ignoring this correlation if it wasn't for this one word.
      > >Interestingly, 202, 201, and 200 have some of the lowest frequencies of
      > >IHSOUS.
      > >
      > Dave,
      > I would suggest that this is because 211 and 221 are mostly
      > narrative, and 202, 201, 200 are mostly discourse. In a narrative, for
      > instance the Passion Narrative, it is necessary continually to specify
      > who is speaking or acting, otherwise the words or actions of Judas,
      > Peter, Pilate, or the High Priest, and so on, might be confused with the
      > words or actions of Jesus. In a passage of discourse, however, it may
      > well be supposed that it is obvious that only Jesus is speaking
      > throughout. In the long Sermon on the Mount, Mt 5.1-7.27, for instance,
      > the name Jesus is not used once. He is simply assumed to be the only
      > speaker. So the genre of the material determines that the name Jesus
      > occurs more frequently in the mostly narrative triple tradition passages
      > than in the mostly discourse double tradition.

      Brian,

      This sounds perfectly plausible, and if true then we should still see this
      when we look at all the data. Here's the full set of numbers for frequency
      of use of Jesus (IHSOUS) in all 19 concordance categories:

      211 3.45% (43 in 1248, or 1 per 29 words)
      221 2.02% (20 in 992, or 1 per 50 words)
      212 1.932% (4 out of 207, or 1 per 52 words)
      122 1.883% (10 out of 531, or 1 per 53 words)
      222 1.273% (19 out of 1493, or 1 per 79 words)
      121 0.763% (10 out of 1311, or 1 per 131 words)
      112 0.526% (9 out of 1710, or 1 per 190 words)

      Overall frequencies of 'Jesus' in triple tradition passages in each Gospel

      Matthew (211+221+212+222) = 2.18%
      Mark (221+122+222+121) = 1.36%
      Luke (121+122+222+112) = 1.07%

      210 2.53% (21 in 829, or 1 per 39 words)
      022 1.754% (5 out of 285, or 1 per 57 words)
      012 1.176% (4 out of 340, or 1 per 85 words)
      021 0.739% (3 out of 406, or 1 per 135 words)
      201 0.601% (8 out of 1332, or 1 per 167 words)
      220 0.547% (6 out of 1097, or 1 per 183 words)
      120 0.509% (5 in 983, or 1 per 197 words)
      202 0.308% (5 in 1621, or 1 per 324 words)
      102 0.082% (1 in 1220, or 1 per 1220 words)

      200 0.677% (26 out of 3842, or 1 per 148 words)
      002 0.539% (31 out of 5755, or 1 per 186 words)
      020 0.312% (2 in 641, or 1 per 321 words)

      Does this show that the frequency of use of 'Jesus' is mainly due to genre,
      or mainly due to the Mathean synoptist choosing to use 'Jesus' instead of
      'he' more often? If it's the former then I think we should remove IHSOUS
      from the correlations because we're adding a genre bias, but if it's the
      latter then IHSOUS should stay. Based purely on the above numbers I would
      say that, generally speaking, the frequencies run this way:

      Triple > Double > Sondergut
      Matthew > Mark > Luke

      Any thoughts?

      Dave Inglis
      david@...
      3538 O'Connor Drive
      Lafayette, CA, USA



      Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
      List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.