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[Synoptic-L] Matt 10:17-25

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  • Zeba Crook
    Aland (_SQE_ 15), Boismard-LaMouille (_Synopsis Graeca Quattuor Evangeliorum_) and Huck-Leitzmann (_Synopsis of the First Three Gospels_, 9th ed.), as well as
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 1, 2002
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      Aland (_SQE_ 15), Boismard-LaMouille (_Synopsis Graeca Quattuor
      Evangeliorum_) and Huck-Leitzmann (_Synopsis of the First Three
      Gospels_, 9th ed.), as well as the Harper-Collins edition of the NRSV,
      all include vss. 24-25 within this larger pericope of Matt 10:17-25.
      They title it, variously, "The Fate of the Disciples," (Alland) or
      "Coming Persecutions" (H-C NRSV) [B-L do not title their pericopae].

      But I can't see what the seven verses referring to persecution have to
      do with the sudden observation that disciples and slaves are not better
      than their superiors?

      The jarring discontinuity between these two verses and what precedes it
      makes me wonder two things:

      1) why do many editors lump these verses all together as if they all
      have to do with the same thing? Do they, but I'm missing it?

      And assuming they do not have much in common:

      2) the difference between verses 24-25 in Matt and 6:40 in Luke is
      considerable: in Luke/Q the reference does not come out of nowhere.
      Given the source critical options available to us, I'm trying to figure
      out which hypothesis deals best with this.

      On the 2DH, Matt has been following Mark at 13:9-13, and then turns to
      Q 6:40 and then 12:2-9. Matt is skipping around in Q, but that is
      consistent with how he treats both Q and Mark. The material from Q
      12:2-9 follows nicely on Matt's previous 10:17-23, but Matt's insertion
      of 6:40 here is jarring. On the 2DH, it seems, Matt has been a sloppy
      redactor here.

      Matt having written first (Two Gospel/Griesbach Hypothesis) requires
      that he wrote this passage this way. While the 2DH makes Matt a sloppy
      redactor, the 2GH appears to have to argue that he is inarticulate.
      Might this suggest that the Q/Luke placement of the verse/s is original
      and Matt's secondary? Is it more probable that *somebody*, Luke or Q,
      originally composed something that makes sense than that Matt composed
      something that does not? Is the 2DH explanation, with its equally
      unflattering depiction of Matt, any better?

      On the Farrer-Goulder Hypothesis, Matt follows Mark, then adds
      significant material not found in Mark (Matt's 10:17-40). F-G must
      argue that Matt had sources which led him to sloppily add this verse; if
      they have Matt compose this section on his own, they run into the same
      problem as the 2GH. Further, they have to argue that Matt's placement
      is more original here than Luke's (as they do in every instance of the
      double tradition, which poses its own problems). They might be able to
      do this, it seems to me, with something related to the text-critical
      principle of lectio difficilor.

      Any ideas or contributions?

      Zeb

      ***

      Zeba Antonin Crook (Ph.D. Cand)
      University of St. Michael's College
      Faculty of Theology
      81 St. Mary Street
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
      M5S 1J4

      (416) 964-8629
      http://individual.utoronto.ca/zeba_crook
      (please note new web page address)


      Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
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    • Ken Olson
      ... 10.17-23] have to do with the sudden observation that disciples and slaves are not better than their superiors [Mt. 10.24-25]?
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 1, 2002
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        At 3.44 PM on January 1, 2001, Zeba Crook wrote:

        >>I can't see what the seven verses referring to persecution [Mt.
        10.17-23] have to do with the sudden observation that disciples and
        slaves are not better than their superiors [Mt. 10.24-25]?<<

        Zeba,

        I don't see a jarring discord here. It seems to be a warning to
        Jesus' followers that they must endure the same fate he did. The
        persecutions they must endure will be like the persecutions he endured
        ("it is enough for the disciple to be like the teacher"). The theme
        is found expilicitly later in the discourse at Mt. 10.38 ("whoever
        does not take up the cross and follow me is not worthy of me").
        Jesus' followers are, of course, promised a reward if they do imitate
        Jesus in his patient endurance for the faith. This is a major theme
        of Mark, but by no means absent in Mt. and Lk.

        Happy New Year.

        Ken



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