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[Synoptic-L] Western text - Evidence of 2 'editions' of Luke/Acts?

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  • David Inglis
    To all Synoptic-L listers, Please can you help a newcomer to the list. Based on what I ve read, various people have suggested that the Western text of
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 30, 2001
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      To all Synoptic-L listers,
       
      Please can you help a newcomer to the list.  Based on what I've read, various people have suggested that the Western text of Luke/Acts could only have come into being if there were two 'edition's of these books.  I think this is a good workable hypothesis, so I'm trying to find evidence of this, and I have some questions:
       
      1    Is there any evidence in the Synoptics that might suggest that Luke existed in 2 editions.  For example (assuming Markan priority) could we have had an ordering such as Mark, Luke1, Matthew, Luke2?
       
      2    Do the differences between the Western and other texts of Luke (or Acts) have a common 'theme'.  In other words, does it look as though the Western text could have been created for a different readership?  If so, what does that readership appear to be?
       
      3    I've seen references that Western Luke is both longer *and* shorter than other texts.  I know about the Western non-interpolations (IMHO a horrible phrase), but overall which is the longer text?
       
      4    Finally, if this is not the right list for these kind of questions, please could you let me know what list might be better?
       
      I would very much appreciate it if someone could provide answers to these questions, or at least point me to some (preferably on-line) resources that do.
       
      Thank you in advance,
       
      Dave Inglis
      No theological qualifications
      Lafayette, CA, USA
    • Stephen C. Carlson
      ... Welcome! ... W.A.Strange makes a pretty good case for a similar scenario, explaining that the publication of Acts was posthumous, with the Western and
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 30, 2001
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        At 11:27 AM 11/30/2001 -0800, David Inglis wrote:
        >Please can you help a newcomer to the list.

        Welcome!

        >Based on what I've read,
        >various people have suggested that the Western text of Luke/Acts could only
        >have come into being if there were two 'edition's of these books. I think
        >this is a good workable hypothesis, so I'm trying to find evidence of this,
        >and I have some questions:

        W.A.Strange makes a pretty good case for a similar scenario, explaining that
        the publication of Acts was posthumous, with the Western and non-Western texts
        being derived from different editorial treatments of the author's annotations.
        His book might help layout some of the evidence.

        >1 Is there any evidence in the Synoptics that might suggest that Luke
        >existed in 2 editions. For example (assuming Markan priority) could we have
        >had an ordering such as Mark, Luke1, Matthew, Luke2?

        I'm not aware of any MSS evidence along the lines that Strange
        cited for his analysis of Acts, but some (mostly older) critics
        have argued for a proto-Luke based on internal considerations
        such as the second beginning of Luke at 3:1, Luke's failure
        to resume themes established in chapters 1-2 later on in the
        gospel, etc. Even older critics, such as Streeter and Taylor,
        have argued for a proto-Luke that comprises what we now think
        of as Q and L.

        >2 Do the differences between the Western and other texts of Luke (or
        >Acts) have a common 'theme'. In other words, does it look as though the
        >Western text could have been created for a different readership? If so,
        >what does that readership appear to be?

        There is some evidence that the Western text of Acts is anti-Jewish.

        >3 I've seen references that Western Luke is both longer *and* shorter
        >than other texts. I know about the Western non-interpolations (IMHO a
        >horrible phrase), but overall which is the longer text?

        Don't know. The Western text of Acts is about 10% longer, though.

        >4 Finally, if this is not the right list for these kind of questions,
        >please could you let me know what list might be better?

        As long as the topic continues to involve Luke and a critical
        treatment of it, yes.

        Stephen Carlson
        --
        Stephen C. Carlson mailto:scarlson@...
        Synoptic Problem Home Page http://www.mindspring.com/~scarlson/synopt/
        "Poetry speaks of aspirations, and songs chant the words." Shujing 2.35


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      • Maluflen@aol.com
        In a message dated 11/30/2001 5:13:14 PM Eastern Standard Time, scarlson@mindspring.com writes:
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 30, 2001
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          In a message dated 11/30/2001 5:13:14 PM Eastern Standard Time,
          scarlson@... writes:

          << Based on what I've read,
          >various people have suggested that the Western text of Luke/Acts could only
          >have come into being if there were two 'edition's of these books. I think
          >this is a good workable hypothesis, so I'm trying to find evidence of this,
          >and I have some questions:

          W.A.Strange makes a pretty good case for a similar scenario, explaining that
          the publication of Acts was posthumous, with the Western and non-Western
          texts
          being derived from different editorial treatments of the author's
          annotations.
          His book might help layout some of the evidence. >>

          If my memory serves me, the subject of two editions of Luke-Acts was treated
          in some depth by M.-E. Boismard and A. Lamouille in the 1980's (1984?), and
          also by Edouard Delebecque (1986?), and see the review of these works in an
          article by E. Cothenet in Esprit et Vie (1990). Boismard and Delebecque
          argue, again if my memory serves me, that the longer text of Acts represents
          a later edition of the same book done by Luke himself. Delebecque's work may
          have been done quite independently of Boismard's (he is not, as far as I
          know, involved in the Ecole Biblique, and is primarily a [classical] Greek
          linguist). I couldn't tell you for sure if there is a significant difference
          in their theories. The title of Cothenet's article is intriguing: "Les deux
          Actes des Apotres ou les Actes des deux Apotres?" (excuse the lack of proper
          French accents). The allusion of the second part of the title is to a book by
          Boismard from 1990 titled "Les Actes des deux Apotres". I remember perusing
          this book when it first came out, or in the last few years anyway, but don't
          recall what his thesis here is precisely (beyond the focus on Peter and then
          Paul in Acts) and how it relates to his work on the two editions of Acts,
          which seems to be an entirely different question. It seems to me that Justin
          Taylor, also of the Ecole Biblique in Jerusalem, has also written on this
          topic, possibly even in English. Hope this helps.

          Leonard Maluf
          .

          Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
          List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
        • Emmanuel Fritsch
          ... This question may be seen in fact as the source of renewal for Boismardian study of synoptic problem, during the 90 s. The ground studies are Le texte
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 3, 2001
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            > Please can you help a newcomer to the list. Based on what I've read, various
            > people have suggested that the Western text of Luke/Acts could only have come
            > into being if there were two 'edition's of these books. I think this is a
            > good workable hypothesis, so I'm trying to find evidence of this, and I have
            > some questions:

            This question may be seen in fact as the source of renewal
            for Boismardian study of synoptic problem, during the 90's.

            The ground studies are "Le texte occidental des Actes des Apotres -
            Reconstitution and rehabilitation", and "Les Actes des deux Apotres".
            Boismard leaded that study with Arnaud Lamouille, at the end of the 80's.

            The first study is a fine restitution of the greek text of Western Tewt.
            Just for that reason, I think Boismard-Lamouille may interest your purpose.
            I would like to know if other restitution of the Western Text may compete
            with this one.

            The second study is the textual and historical critics of the text of Acts.
            If I remember well, Boismard-Lamouille just made the textual critics, the
            historical critics being reached by Taylor.

            Their main thesis on Act, that Boismard extends later to Luke,
            is a triple stage redaction process. First, Act I, which works
            from Baptist documents. Then Act II, which is the TA, then
            Act III, which is a new edition of Act II, comming back, place
            ti place, to the original readings of Act I.

            In later books, Act I is identified with a proto-Luke, Act II is
            Luke, and Act III is a later editor of Luke.

            Allusion of these works are found in a SBL critics :
            http://www.bookreviews.org/Reviews/2850211079.html

            references of Boismards works are on his editor Gabalda's site :
            www.gabalda.com

            a+
            manu

            Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
            List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
          • Emmanuel Fritsch
            I gave Yesterday to David Inglis some redundant information, yet given by Leonard. I apologize, and give some other precisions. Some information about Boismard
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 4, 2001
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              I gave Yesterday to David Inglis some redundant information,
              yet given by Leonard. I apologize, and give some other precisions.

              Some information about Boismard may be found on :
              http://archeboc.free.fr

              > If my memory serves me, the subject of two editions of Luke-Acts was treated
              > in some depth by M.-E. Boismard and A. Lamouille in the 1980's (1984?), and

              1988, I think

              > I couldn't tell you for sure if there is a significant difference
              > in their theories. The title of Cothenet's article is intriguing: "Les deux
              > Actes des Apotres ou les Actes des deux Apotres?" (excuse the lack of proper
              > French accents). The allusion of the second part of the title is to a book by
              > Boismard from 1990 titled "Les Actes des deux Apotres". I remember perusing
              > this book when it first came out, or in the last few years anyway, but don't
              > recall what his thesis here is precisely (beyond the focus on Peter and then
              > Paul in Acts) and how it relates to his work on the two editions of Acts,
              > which seems to be an entirely different question.


              I may be wrong, but if I well remember, it is the same question.
              The first study is the restitution of the western text of Acts,
              and "Les Actes des deux Apotres" is the critical study. Boismard
              and Lamouille identified two different editions of Acts, both due
              to Luke, or at least both wearing some typical lukan stylistic features.

              I must precise that this idea of a single author being responsible of
              two different editions of his work was yet presented in an initiation
              book dated of 1980. "Initiation a la critique textuelle du Nouveau
              Testament" presents in fact many interesting reflexions on scholarship,
              including considerations that have been presented as a new paradigm of
              research in the agenda of Jerusalem symposium, in 1984.

              > It seems to me that Justin
              > Taylor, also of the Ecole Biblique in Jerusalem, has also written on this
              > topic, possibly even in English. Hope this helps.

              As I said yesterday, the part of Justin Taylor in this work
              is the last tome of the serie, dedicated to historical critic.
              All in french, if I well remember.

              a+
              manu

              Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
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            • Emmanuel Fritsch
              Looking in my archives, I found some paper around Boismard, one answering to a thread twelve days old : ... There is a paper of Justin Taylor in english, in
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 13, 2001
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                Looking in my archives, I found some paper around Boismard,
                one answering to a thread twelve days old :

                Maluflen@... wrote :
                >
                > It seems to me that Justin
                > Taylor, also of the Ecole Biblique in Jerusalem, has also written on this
                > topic, possibly even in English. Hope this helps.

                There is a paper of Justin Taylor in english, in the
                Revue Biblique, "The Making of Acts : A new account"
                RB 1990 T 97.4 pp. 504-524.

                hope this helps.

                a+
                manu

                Synoptic-L Homepage: http://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/synoptic-l
                List Owner: Synoptic-L-Owner@...
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